Episode 492 Scott Adams: Proposing a Capitalist Healthcare Plan That’s Either Brilliant, or the Opposite


Topics: 

  • Capitalist version of a healthcare plan
  • Healthcare Confusopoly – Whiteboard
  • Business model of the press inhibits seeking, promoting solutions
  • Suggestions for fixing healthcare
    • Price Transparency
    • Healthcare Insurer rebates if consumer finds bargains
    • Market for health data sharing

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The post Episode 492 Scott Adams: Proposing a Capitalist Healthcare Plan That’s Either Brilliant, or the Opposite appeared first on Dilbert Blog.


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Lessons from Tara: Life Advice from the World’s Most Brilliant Dog – David Rosenfelt

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Lessons from Tara: Life Advice from the World’s Most Brilliant Dog

David Rosenfelt

Genre: Comedy

Price: $ 22.99

Publish Date: July 31, 2015

© ℗ © 2015 Listen & Live Audio

iTunes Store: Top Audiobooks in Comedy

Episode 459 Scott Adams: Talking With Writer, Boxer, Brilliant Guy @EdLatimore on Success

Topics: 

  • Ed Latimore’s fascinating, inspirational life story and positivity
  • Born in the projects, physicist, veteran, pro boxer, writer, mentor, tutor, teacher, popular Twitter account, perpetual seeker of knowledge
  • Ed’s book, available on Amazon:
    • Not Caring What Other People Think is a Superpower: Insights from a Heavyweight Boxer

Donate to support my Periscopes and Podcasts:

I also fund my Periscopes and podcasts via audience micro-donations on Patreon. I prefer these methods over accepting advertisements or working for a “boss” somewhere because it keeps my voice independent. No one owns me, and that is rare. I’m trying in my own way to make the world a better place, and your contributions help me stay inspired to do that.
See all of my Periscope videos here.
Find my WhenHub Interface app here.
This is a demonstration of a personal DONATE button you can add to any blog or web page. All you need is a free account on the Interface by WhenHub app.

The post Episode 459 Scott Adams: Talking With Writer, Boxer, Brilliant Guy @EdLatimore on Success appeared first on Dilbert Blog.


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Bad to brilliant: Wilson keeps Seahawks’ playoff hopes alive

Russell Wilson rebounds from rough first half and rallies the Seahawks past the Packers in a game they had to have.
www.espn.com – TOP
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Episode 301 Scott Adams: FOXNews Supporting CNN on Acosta Lawsuit is Brilliant But Looks Stupid to You

Topic: 

  • FOXNews files amicus brief aligning themselves with CNN and Acosta
    • Don’t get lost in the weeds on this
    • FOXNews performed a brilliant high-ground maneuver

I fund my Periscopes and podcasts via audience micro-donations on Patreon. I prefer this method over accepting advertisements or working for a “boss” somewhere because it keeps my voice independent. No one owns me, and that is rare. I’m trying in my own way to make the world a better place, and your contributions help me stay inspired to do that.

See all of my Periscope videos here.

Find my WhenHub Interface app here.

The post Episode 301 Scott Adams: FOXNews Supporting CNN on Acosta Lawsuit is Brilliant But Looks Stupid to You appeared first on Dilbert Blog.


Dilbert Blog

Hugh Grant delivers in Amazon’s brilliant ‘A Very English Scandal’

A delicious three-part import with a first-class pedigree, “A Very English Scandal” tells the true story of British politician Jeremy Thorpe and his secret lover, played — in a dream pairing — by Hugh Grant and Ben Whishaw. Full of sly humor, poignant commentary and bizarre twists, it’s almost like the perfect marriage of “The Crown” and a Coen brothers movie.


CNN.com – RSS Channel – Entertainment

GamersGate: The World's Largest Online Game Store

‘Crisis Actor’ Alex Jones Gets A Taste Of His Own Medicine In Brilliant Troll

Comedy Central confronts the Infowars host with a stunning accusation.
Comedy
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‘Losing sucks’: Tom Brady was brilliant but leaves broken

The greatest quarterback of all time threw for a record-setting 505 yards, but somehow it wasn’t enough to save the Patriots. He’s feeling broken now — but he’ll be back.
www.espn.com – NFL

A Brilliant Young Mind – Morgan Matthews

Morgan Matthews - A Brilliant Young Mind  artwork

A Brilliant Young Mind

Morgan Matthews

Genre: Drama

Price: $ 12.99

Rental Price: $ 3.99

Release Date: January 26, 2016


Inspired by true events, A Brilliant Young Mind tells the story of teenage math prodigy Nathan, who struggles when it comes to building relationships. In his confusing world, Nathan finds comfort in the predictability of numbers. But after earning a spot to compete in the prestigious International Math Olympiad, he faces new and unexpected challenges, ultimately triumphing in life and love.

iTunes Store: Top Movies in Independent

Brilliant Corners – Thelonious Monk

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Brilliant Corners

Thelonious Monk

Genre: Jazz

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: December 31, 1956

© ℗ 2008 Concord Music Group, Inc.

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Jazz

The Brilliant Snark Of Twitter Shined Brightly During The #SolarEclipse2017

Twitter users came, and they came in totality.
Comedy
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‘Tweet’ Is The Brilliant Animated Trump Parody Of Radiohead’s ‘Creep’

It’s a good question: What the hell ARE we doing here?
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This Snapchat Rainbow Makeup Tutorial Is Beyond Brilliant for Halloween

If you're mourning the loss of Snapchat's rainbow lens or you completely missed the boat (kidding, just about every celebrity and Facebook friend has posted this), don't worry. You can experience the look all over…


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Teen Technorati – Brilliant Teens Shack Up in the Bay Area to Bring Their $100K Ideas to Life

A bunch of talented teens all under 20 years old move in together. Sounds like the plot of a new MTV show, but for the winners of the $ 100,000 Thiel Fellowship, it’s reality. In this episode of Teen Technorati, the fellows give us a tour of their San Francisco and Oakland apartments, where they’re working on their projects and bringing their ideas to life.
WIRED Videos – The Scene

Brilliant! Stephen Colbert ponders a better world ‘if women were in charge’

“I don’t have all the answers,” he writes in a Glamour guest column. “And frankly, it’s sexist of you to think I do just because I’m a man.”


TODAY Pop Culture

Live webcam sex! More than 20000 Hot Girls are waiting for you!

The Vanity Accessory You Never Knew You Needed: Byredo’s Brilliant Hand Cream Crank

Photographed by Elizabeth Brockway

The embrace of luxury is never better than when paired with a certain make-your-life-easier ingenuity. So when we spotted this impossibly chic marble and chrome contraption while browsing Byredo’s recently opened Wooster Street boutique in New York City, we simply had to have it. Dear friends, if you have ever ruminated over the nail polish brush that just misses the bottom of the bottle or the last vestiges of a beloved lipstick clinging to its concave bullet, take note: Because you can now sleep better knowing that at least no trace of your favorite face or hand cream need ever go unused again. Designed by founder Ben Gorham exclusively for the SoHo space, the machine allows you to crank an almost-empty tube of product around its metal rod, and, with a twist of the wrist, free the last gasps of salve from its aluminum container without any need for MacGyver-esque techniques (read: splitting the tube open and scraping the final remnants out with the same intensity one might devote to a Death Becomes Her immortality elixir). For the record, we fully intend to put our Marvis toothpaste to a similar off-label test. And defying all odds, it also happens to look great on a well-conceived vanity—making it the perfect marriage of modern opulence and classic practicality.

Byredo marble and chrome hand cream dispenser, $ 300
62 Wooster Street
212.219.1584

The post The Vanity Accessory You Never Knew You Needed: Byredo’s Brilliant Hand Cream Crank appeared first on Vogue.

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A New Documentary Reveals the Brilliant, Contradictory Imagination of Nina Simone

nina simone documentary

Even if it is possible to be both frank and enigmatic, raw and refined, Nina Simone, who rose to prominence a half a century ago, spent most of her career trapped beyond the limits of her art. She did not take to imitation. Yet she sought to join with every sort of music she could find. Simone recorded jazz. She made funk. She sang Top 50 rock hits and rejuvenated folk. She was internationally lauded and resented as a performer of protest music. And she seemed to inhabit each of these genres as if it were her main vein of craft, the music that she’d been performing all her life. For an extraordinary decade, Simone was the resonant sound box of a nation in change. Then, abruptly and for several years, she vanished from the stage.

In What Happened, Miss Simone?, a smart new documentary by Liz Garbus available today on Netflix, the brilliant, sometimes contradicting layers of Simone’s myth get peeled back to reveal the even more brilliant, contradictory imagination at its core. The movie’s title, taken from an essay by Maya Angelou, gestures toward a question that continues to haunt especially the troubled, crazy years of Simone’s later career. If most Behind the Music-style movies trade in stories of creative martyrdom—underneath the genius is a vulnerable, broken person—Simone’s biography offers one twist more. Underneath the vulnerable, broken person, it turns out, there was a genius. Simone’s slow effort to get to that far shore of her creative mind is why her recordings are today still daring and direct.

Nina Simone was born Eunice Waymon in the mountainous west of North Carolina. She began playing the piano at four, to accompany revival meetings in the church where her mother was a preacher, yet her path from the black church tradition to the recording studio was more circuitous than that of many people in the segregated South. Weekends, she would cross the railroad tracks to the white part of town, to study classical piano with a teacher who had offered her free lessons. She loved it. “I studied to become the first black classical pianist in America, and that was all that was on my mind,” Simone later explained. Her teacher raised a small cache of money for her—it was known as the Eunice Waymon Fund—and, at seventeen, she left North Carolina, first for New York City, and then for Philadelphia, home to the Curtis Institute, perhaps the leading music conservatory in the country. Curtis rejected Eunice, which puzzled her, until she realized that it was due to the color of her skin. “I never really got over that jolt of racism,” she said.

Desperate because the Eunice Waymon Fund had run out, she found a job playing the piano at a bar in Atlantic City. She was told that if she hoped to keep it, she’d have to sing, too—something that she’d never done. Afraid that her mother would learn that she was performing “the devil’s music” (pop), she gave herself the performing name Nina Simone.

Yet audiences loved her. In the late fifties, Simone had begun to record some of the songs for which she’d become known in clubs, including “My Baby Just Cares for Me,” a forgotten show tune that, years later, had a second life in a Chanel ad, and “I Loves You, Porgy,” which first put her on the map. In 1960, Simone was booked into the young Newport Jazz Festival—her first big break—and began making screen appearances around the same time. Garbus’s documentary shows us Simone performing her early hit in the harem-like lounge of Playboy’s Penthouse, the short-lived Hugh Hefner television special. Simone gives the song’s lyrics particular weight, as she always did, though it isn’t hard under the circumstances (“Don’t let him take me / Don’t let him handle me / With his hot hands”). Hefner seems oblivious to the irony. By 1963, Simone achieved her first life goal, performing a landmark concert in Carnegie Hall. Still, the victory was bittersweet—she would have preferred, she wrote her mother, to be playing Bach.



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Photo: Vernon Merritt III/The LIFE Images Collection

The restiveness of Simone’s musical taste, the way that, in performance, she always seemed to reach for something harder, stranger, and truer, was unmistakable even to those who did not notice when she turned a blues piano solo into a cadenza of two-part counterpoint or played one song while singing another (a gesture of wild avant-gardism and two-track genius that amazed even Miles Davis). “Nina had a wonderful way of taking a piece of music and not interpreting it but metamorphizing it, morphing it into her experience,” Al Schackman, the jazz guitarist who was her lifelong friend and musical collaborator, says in the documentary. The most enduring of Simone’s music may be her performances of the jazz canon. In her hands, a standard like “Love Me or Leave Me” became definitive. There is surely no more perfect recording of “The Other Woman” than Simone’s eerie, introspective rendition; her performance of “I Put a Spell on You,” which rivals Screamin’ Jay Hawkins’s, and cuts to the wild heart of the song. And which is the better version of “Just in Time”—her light-heeled, anthemic Paris version or her edgy, ecstatic performance at the Village Gate? Most musicians are lucky if they can get inside a song enough to cut one perfect track, but Simone seems to have done nothing else, across a range of styles. In her hands, the clunky waltz of “Mr. Bojangles” became a heartbreaking ballad; her recording of “Here Comes the Sun” has more early-morning light in it that even the Beatles’s.

For a few years, Simone was able to enjoy the benefits of her musical range. She’d married Andrew Stroud, a vice-squad cop who quit the force to act as her manager. Stroud excelled at bringing in opportunities, and the couple bought a lovely house in Mount Vernon, New York, where they began to raise a daughter, Lisa. By the middle sixties, though, the marriage had begun to fall on strange, hard times. Simone, by her own account, came to resent Stroud for working her as hard as he did. He became physically abusive. (In one case, according to Simone’s letters and diaries, which are quoted through Garbus’s documentary, he raped her.) “I think they were both nuts,” says their daughter, who is also an executive producer of the film. “She stayed with him. That’s like playing with fire.”

By the late sixties, Simone had discovered politics—and carried it to a daring extreme. She was an early voice of the burgeoning civil rights movement, surrounding herself with a range of brilliant writers and thinkers. (In Mount Vernon, she lived next door to Malcolm X’s family.) As a young woman, Simone had largely avoided racial discussions; she’d been raised to think of race as an unfit subject and, anyway, she had aspired to join the world of white piano virtuosi. In the sixties, though, she increasingly began to celebrate her African-American heritage through song. In 1965, she released an incantatory recording of the spiritual “Sinnerman.” Many of Simone’s political songs, which she wrote herself, have become classics: Her 1964 hit “Mississippi Goddam” proved incendiary, even as it turned her into something of a movement hero. “She was kind of the patron saint of the rebellion,” the critic Stanley Crouch recalls.

As the assassinations of the decade intensified, and politics turned dark, Simone grew increasingly militant and single-minded. If she knew how to operate a gun, she said, she would be shooting people; since she didn’t, she sang, and what she sang alienated her from timid white audiences. As Simone’s performance repertoire became thick with protest music, she had trouble booking gigs. When she did perform, her behavior was erratic: She would shout at audience members, or walk out if she didn’t like what she saw. “People think that when she went onstage, that’s when she became Nina Simone,” her daughter says. “My mother was Nina Simone 24/7, and that’s where it became a problem.”

After suffering a kind of nervous breakdown, tempered only by deep bouts of depression, Simone simply disappeared: She left her husband and daughter, who had little idea where she had gone. In 1970, she landed in Barbados (a louche chapter not addressed in Garbus’s film) and then Liberia, to which she summoned her daughter, who lived with her a year before finding her unendurable and returning to the United States. Simone said that she loved Africa; it felt to her like a beautiful nation of her people. Yet she stopped playing music there, and soon ran out of money. She gave a comeback concert at the 1976 Montreux Jazz Festival—perhaps her finest, strangest performance ever—and then disappeared again. Some years later, her friends discovered her in Paris, living in a hovel, dressing in raggedy clothes, and playing in a small café for 300 dollars a night.

A small group, including Schackman, tried to get her on her feet again, beginning with a psychological evaluation; Simone, at last, was diagnosed as bipolar. In the Netherlands, where she was set up with a new apartment, Simone was put on a medication that helped her regain emotional equilibrium, even as it brought about a slow decay of her voice and her motor skills.

It’s tempting to regard this long late phase of Simone’s career, from the seventies until her death, in 2003, of breast cancer, as a sad coda to her glories of the sixties. But the truth is that the music that she made is some of the most revelatory of her career. Onstage at the Montreux Jazz Festival in 1976, Simone was meandering and a little nuts, a woman who had clearly come apart. Yet despite this internal chaos, or perhaps because of it, the show she gave seemed to break through to a new place in vocal music: one that transcended style and convention, that presented music not as entertainment but as public introspection. Her rendition of “Feelings,” the artifact of seventies schlock, is a master class in her approach, a lesson in the way that she could strip away the slick exterior of a song and rebuild it from the inside out.

Simone’s performance here, if “performance” is even the word, is so direct and candid, so supple in its flickers between self-disclosure and postmodern play, that it still seems brazen. At the time—an era caked in the artifice of glam rock and the ginned-up intimacy of the guitar ballad—it would have been the rawest thing on the airwaves, if it had ever made it there. Instead, it became something better: a standard to reach for. The stretching continues. Simone’s best work was the music of a future that, today, we’re still hoping will come.

The post A New Documentary Reveals the Brilliant, Contradictory Imagination of Nina Simone appeared first on Vogue.

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‘Every Brilliant Thing’: Theater Review


This one-man play starring British actor-comedian Jonny Donahoe concerns a young boy’s response to his mother’s suicide attempt

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Hollywood Reporter – Theater Reviews Feed

Norwegian Singer Thea And The Wild Releases Stream Of Their Brilliant Debut Single ‘Heart Attack’ [Listen]

Contactmusic Ltd | Latest 40 posts

Hundreds of Men are waiting for You!

Brilliant Gym Ad Says What We’re All Thinking About Kimye’s Marriage

New York Sports Club released an ad Wednesday that even Don Draper would be proud of.

Following Kim Kardashian and Kanye West’s over-the-top Italian wedding, the NYC-based gym took out a full page ad in the New York Post that poked fun at Kardashian’s relationship history as a ploy to get people to work out.

It’s no surprise that the ad blew up on the Internet and was picked up and posted by every media outlet known to man. Bravo NYSC.

But just in case you need a follow-up ad for your campaign, we came up with one for you:

Kanye, stay in shape. You’ve got to last at least 41 minutes.

Entertainment – The Huffington Post
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