Studio 360: The Great Gatsby – Kurt Andersen

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Studio 360: The Great Gatsby

Kurt Andersen

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 0.95

Publish Date: November 27, 2010

© ℗ © 2010 WNYC New York and Public Radio International

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The World’s Great Men of Music – Harriette Brower

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The World’s Great Men of Music

Harriette Brower

Genre: Music

Publish Date: January 1, 1928

Publisher: Public Domain

Seller: Public Domain


This book takes a through the lane of musical history in which the story lives of various master musicians has been introduced. In every musical career described in this book there is wealth of inspiration and practical guidance for the artist in any field.

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Kanye West Gifted Trump A ‘Make America Great’ Hat and Yeezys

Kanye West may have heard the outcry over his MAGA hat, because we found out he changed it up after the media left the Oval and gave Trump a cap, sans the word, “again.” Check out the embroidery on the hat the Prez is wearing  … “Make America…

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The Great Gildersleeve: Family Man (Original Recording) – Original Radio Broadcast

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The Great Gildersleeve: Family Man (Original Recording)

Original Radio Broadcast

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 14.95

Publish Date: August 2, 2018

© ℗ © 2018 Radio Spirits

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Wouldn’t It Be Great – Loretta Lynn

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Wouldn’t It Be Great

Loretta Lynn

Genre: Country

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: September 28, 2018

© ℗ 2018 Loretta Lynn Enterprises, Inc. under exclusive license to Sony Music Entertainment

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Episode 233 Scott Adams: Kavanaugh’s Virgin Card and Trump’s Great Week

Topics: 

  • Kavanaugh was a virgin through high school and many years beyond
  • Judge Kavanaugh “set the bar” very high in his MacCallum interview
  • Whiteboard discussion: President Trump’s GREAT week!

I fund my Periscopes and podcasts via audience micro-donations on Patreon. I prefer this method over accepting advertisements or working for a “boss” somewhere because it keeps my voice independent. No one owns me, and that is rare. I’m trying in my own way to make the world a better place, and your contributions help me stay inspired to do that.

See all of my Periscope videos here.

Find my WhenHub Interface app here.

The post Episode 233 Scott Adams: Kavanaugh’s Virgin Card and Trump’s Great Week appeared first on Dilbert Blog.


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Inspiration for Great Songwriting: For Pop, Rock & Roll, Jazz, Blues, Broadway, and Country Songwriters: A Cheat Sheet Book About Creativity with Form, Lyrics, Music, and More (Unabridged) – Tommy Gordon

Tommy Gordon - Inspiration for Great Songwriting: For Pop, Rock & Roll, Jazz, Blues, Broadway, and Country Songwriters: A Cheat Sheet Book About Creativity with Form, Lyrics, Music, and More (Unabridged)  artwork

Inspiration for Great Songwriting: For Pop, Rock & Roll, Jazz, Blues, Broadway, and Country Songwriters: A Cheat Sheet Book About Creativity with Form, Lyrics, Music, and More (Unabridged)

Tommy Gordon

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 3.95

Publish Date: April 19, 2016

© ℗ © 2016 Fretboard Media Group

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Madewell Just Dropped a Men’s Collection Filled With Great Basics

It was a long time coming: Madewell, a brand synonymous with great denim and well-made basics, has finally dropped a collection for guys. Cue the (deserved) fanfare.

To fashion history nerds, this isn’t necessarily a new venture. Madewell was originally a men’s workwear brand that started in 1937, though was repurposed as a women’s label in 2004. Finally, after two years of design, research and fine-tuning, the brand launched a menswear line that’s perfect for upgrading your wardrobe with some really well-designed and stylish staples.

The drop features plenty of denim (21 styles in three fits), tees and jackets. It’s available starting today both at Madewell and at Nordstrom. Check out our picks below.

Madewell Brooklyn Graphic T-Shirt

Celebrate New York City’s iconic borough with a super soft cotton tee. Wear with dark wash denim or throw it on with a pair of sweats.

[$ 42; nordstrom.com]

Nordstrom

Madewell Slim Straight Fit Jeans

These stretchy jeans are designed to feel so comfortable, you won’t mind lounging in them after a long day. 

[$ 128; nordstrom.com]

 

Nordstorm

Madewell Classic Denim Jacket

A vintage-inspired denim jacket is bound to rack up miles in your wardrobe. This classic style is decidedly timeless, yet the lived-in faded black looks great paired with tees and hoodies.

[$ 128; nordstrom.com]

Madewell

Madewell Cotton Hoodie

You can truly never have too many hoodies. This one is made with soft cotton and has a structured (not sloppy) fit that makes it a great option to wear just about anywhere.

[$ 110; nordstrom.com]

Nordstrom

Madewell Slim Fit Selvedge Jeans

This slim cut pair looks smart, but the distressing gives it that rugged “lived-in” vibe.

[$ 158; nordstrom.com]

Nordstrom

The post Madewell Just Dropped a Men’s Collection Filled With Great Basics appeared first on Men's Journal.

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Aretha Franklin Sings the Great Diva Classics – Aretha Franklin

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Aretha Franklin Sings the Great Diva Classics

Aretha Franklin

Genre: R&B/Soul

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: October 17, 2014

© ℗ 2014 RCA Records, a division of Sony Music Entertainment

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David Howard Presents a Great Ballet Class With Pianist Joe Cross – David Howard

David Howard - David Howard Presents a Great Ballet Class With Pianist Joe Cross  artwork

David Howard Presents a Great Ballet Class With Pianist Joe Cross

David Howard

Genre: Classical

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: June 23, 2014

© ℗ 2014 Roper Records

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12 Great New York Summer Songs

What are your favorite tunes about summer in the city? The host of “New Sounds,” on WNYC, shares his own list.
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The Great Depression – As It Is

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The Great Depression

As It Is

Genre: Alternative

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: August 10, 2018

© ℗ 2018 Fearless Records, a division of Concord Music Group, Inc.

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The Classics, Smooth and Sexy Jazz: Smooth Jazz Plays the Great Love Songs! – Various Artists

Various Artists - The Classics, Smooth and Sexy Jazz: Smooth Jazz Plays the Great Love Songs!  artwork

The Classics, Smooth and Sexy Jazz: Smooth Jazz Plays the Great Love Songs!

Various Artists

Genre: Jazz

Price: $ 7.99

Release Date: June 22, 2018

© ℗ 2018 Shanachie Ent. Corp.

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Rob Kapilow’s What Makes It Great?, Volume 1: Beethoven’s Appassionata Sonata – Rob Kapilow

Rob Kapilow - Rob Kapilow’s What Makes It Great?, Volume 1: Beethoven’s Appassionata Sonata  artwork

Rob Kapilow’s What Makes It Great?, Volume 1: Beethoven’s Appassionata Sonata

Rob Kapilow

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 9.95

Publish Date: April 29, 2015

© ℗ © 2015 Roven Records Spoken Word

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The Playlist: Zayn’s Bizarrely Great Sleaze Rock and 13 More New Songs

Hear tracks from Chance the Rapper, Billie Eilish, Waxahatchee and others.
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Broadway’s My Beat: Great White Way – Morton Fine, David Friedkin

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Broadway’s My Beat: Great White Way

Morton Fine, David Friedkin

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 14.95

Publish Date: July 29, 2015

© ℗ © 2015 Radio Spirits

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The Great Buck Howard – Sean McGinly

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The Great Buck Howard

Sean McGinly

Genre: Comedy

Price: $ 7.99

Rental Price: $ 0.99

Release Date: July 21, 2009


Once upon a time, Buck Howard (John Malkovich) spent his days in the limelight as a mentalist extraordinaire! Nowadays, it’s clear to everyone except Buck that his act has lost its luster. Convinced his comeback is imminent, Buck needs a new road manager and personal assistant. Recent law school drop-out and would-be writer Troy Gable (Colin Hanks) needs a job and a purpose. Working for the pompous, has-been mentalist fills the former requirement, but how it satisfies the latter is questionable. Nonetheless, with the aid of a fiery publicist (Emily Blunt) and a bold stroke of luck, Buck lands back in the American consciousness, taking Troy along for the ride.

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The Best of Pantera: Far Beyond the Great Southern Cowboys’ Vulgar Hits! (Remastered) – Pantera

Pantera - The Best of Pantera: Far Beyond the Great Southern Cowboys' Vulgar Hits! (Remastered)  artwork

The Best of Pantera: Far Beyond the Great Southern Cowboys’ Vulgar Hits! (Remastered)

Pantera

Genre: Metal

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: September 23, 2003

© ℗ 2003 Elektra Entertainment Group. Manufactured and Distributed by Rhino Entertainment Group, a Warner Music Group company

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Inside Mo Bamba’s quest to be the NBA’s next great big man

This is the behind-the-scenes story of how Bamba is training to join the ranks of the league’s top big men.
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The Great Outdoors (1988) – Howard Deutch

Howard Deutch - The Great Outdoors (1988)  artwork

The Great Outdoors (1988)

Howard Deutch

Genre: Comedy

Price: $ 14.99

Rental Price: $ 3.99

Release Date: June 17, 1988


When an unannounced, uninvited and unwelcome family of fun-loving misfits converge upon a lakeside resort to join their relatives for a summer of relaxation, the result is anything but restful in this raucous comedy starring Dan Aykroyd and John Candy. It's a vacationer's worst nightmare, as wheeler-dealer Aykroyd, his sexually repressed wife and eerie twin daughters "join" the easygoing Candy and his straight-laced clan for a season of "fun" in the sun. Unfortunately, the only thing these two in-laws have in common is their intense dislike for each other. Soon, it's brother-in-law against brother-in-law in an uproarious and hilarious fight to the finish to see which one really knows how to enjoy The Great Outdoors.

© © 1988 Universal Studios. All Rights Reserved.

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Lil Boosie Says Kim Kardashian Is Great for Prison Reform

[[tmz:video id=”0_oepc5ufg”]] Lil Boosie says he’s got no problem with Kim Kardashian meeting President Trump to discuss prison reform, and as an ex-inmate himself … he’s sure other prisoners would back her efforts too. We got Boosie Tuesday…

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Former 49ers great Clark dies of ALS at 61

Dwight Clark, the former 49ers star best known for “The Catch” that won the NFC Championship Game in 1982, has died at the age of 61.
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All the Great Hits – Diana Ross

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All the Great Hits

Diana Ross

Genre: R&B/Soul

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: September 30, 1981

© ℗ 2015 Motown Records, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc.

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Kylie Jenner Looks Great as She Hits the Town for Birthday Party

Kylie Jenner is back in action, hitting up The Nice Guy in WeHo and looking like the whole pregnancy thing was just a dream. Kylie showed up for a birthday party in a 2-piece satin suit … pal Harry Hudson, a musician, turned 23. She arrived with her…

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Tesla’s Electric Model 3 Will Be a Great Everyday Car … Some Day

Nearly half a million people have put down a thousand dollar deposit for a Tesla Model 3 they may not get for years. But once the early production bugs are ironed out, the Model 3 feels like it’s going to be a great everyday car.

WIRED Videos

‘The Bachelor’s’ Chris Harrison: Arie & Lauren Are Doing ‘Great,’ ‘They’re A Normal Couple’

At a recent press event for the new season of “The Bachelorette,” host Chris Harrison shares with Access an update about how former “Bachelor” Arie Luyendyk Jr. and fiancée Lauren Burnham are doing now. And, are there any plans to televise the couple’s wedding? “The Bachelorette,” starring Becca Kufrin, premieres Monday at 8/7c on ABC.


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Why Prince Harry’s Wedding Beard Is Great News for Guys With Facial Hair

Call it one of many tradition-breaking moves felt ’round the world. On Saturday, when Prince Harry married his fiancé Meghan Markle, their wedding’s music and sermon, including a gospel choir, reflected the bride’s background and made royal superfans of even the harshest cynics. And true to his reputation as the bad boy of Windsor, Harry showed up with his beard unshaven. Though it may seem small in comparison to everything else that happened on Saturday, it was a grooming choice will undoubtedly have worldwide repercussions.

The post Why Prince Harry’s Wedding Beard Is Great News for Guys With Facial Hair appeared first on Men's Journal.

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The Great Outdoors: Eleven – Troy Adamitis

Troy Adamitis - The Great Outdoors: Eleven  artwork

The Great Outdoors: Eleven

Troy Adamitis

Genre: Sports

Price: $ 12.99

Rental Price: $ 4.99

Release Date: May 1, 2018


After a six year hiatus, The Great Outdoors motocross documentary series finally returns. TGO Eleven not only showcases American motocross as it has traditionally, but has expand globally, covering races in Canada and Europe making the new TGO revival a story that sprawls the planet. Since Ryan Dungey’s retirement, Marvin Musquin, Jason Anderson and their championship trainer, Aldon Baker, will attempt to dispatch Eli Tomac, the fastest rider in the 450 class as well as the threatening Blake Baggett. Supercross champion, Zach Osborne is the favorite for the 250 class. But, Alex Martin, Jeremy Martin, Aaron Plessinger, Colt Nichols, and European, Dylan Ferrandis are also involved in an “anyone can win” scenario. The infamous Alessi family returns to TGO. Mike, Danielle, and Tony Alessi are still on a mission and have moved north to compete in the Canadian Nationals. Finally, a trip to iconic Lommel, Belgium will introduce us to Antonio Cairoli and Jeffrey Herlings of the MXGP circuit.

© © 2017 Trust Content

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Meek Mill Arrives at 76ers Game, ‘I Feel Great!’

He made it … Meek Mill has finally arrived at Wells Fargo Center in Philly in time for the 76ers playoff game — but first things first, dude needs a shower.  Meek arrived with 76ers co-owner Michael Rubin — who flew Meek from the prison to the…

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Walmart Is Letting Its Employees Wear Jeans — But The Dress Code Change Isn’t As Great As It May Seem

Walmart began making headlines Thursday morning when it was reported that the nation’s largest private-sector employer would
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FASHION NEWS UPDATE-Visit Shoe Deals Online today for the hottest deals online for shoes!

The Great American Slut Off 4

The new hos take on the pros. The greatest battle of America debauchery fought within the four walls of our studio.

Watch the Full Length, High Quality Movie!

The new hos take on the pros. The greatest battle of America debauchery fought within the four walls of our studio.

Stars: Karmen Karma Lylith LaVey Porno Dan

Categories: High Definition Gonzo Orgies Amateur

Scene Number: 2

Orientation: Straight

Studio Name: Immoral Productions

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Grow a great beard

So you’ve decided to quit your life as a baby-faced All-American type (or New York Yankee) and grow a beard. Congrats. (No, really: Beards make guys look like boyfriend material in a woman’s eyes, according to research.)

The post Grow a great beard appeared first on Men's Journal.

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Watch Lorde Cover A Deep Cut By Drake, Who Is A ‘Great Hug-Giver’

Lorde covers Drake’s “Shot for Me” at her Melodrama tour stop in Toronto.
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These Great Summer Shoes Are A Steal Right Now

It was 1955 when a Munsingwear salesman from Minnesota named Abbot Pederson went on a bit of a bender in NYC, and on the flight home ended up with a taxidermied penguin he called Pete as his drinking buddy. At some point, a flirty flight attendant slipped Pederson’s tie from around his neck and slipped it onto Pete. The result was an instant mascot for a great American clothing line.

The post These Great Summer Shoes Are A Steal Right Now appeared first on Men's Journal.

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Tesla’s Electric Model 3 Will Be a Great Everyday Car … Some Day

Nearly half a million people have put down a thousand dollar deposit for a Tesla Model 3 they may not get for years. But once the early production bugs are ironed out, the Model 3 feels like it’s going to be a great everyday car.

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Great Moments in Irish History with Denis Leary

Great Moments in Irish History with Denis Leary

Great Moments in Irish History with D… 1:22
Denis Leary on the invention of Shepherd’s Pie. Happy St. Patrick’s Day!
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Sterling K. Brown Has Given Hundreds of Great Performances (This Isn’t One of Them)

Sterling K. Brown Has Given Hundreds of Great Performances (This Isn’t One of Them)

Sterling K. Brown Has Given Hundreds … 2:36
Sterling K. Brown goes a little off-script in this PSA for Communities In Schools.
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The Great American Slut Off 5

We’re searching for the sexiest, nastiest in the U.S. It’s a really dirty job, but we love doing it!

Watch the Full Length, High Quality Movie!

We’re searching for the sexiest, nastiest in the U.S. It’s a really dirty job, but we love doing it!

Stars: Asphylia Noir Casey Stone Jennifer White

Categories: High Definition Anilingus Gonzo Orgies Amateur

Scene Number: 2

Orientation: Straight

Studio Name: Immoral Productions

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A Black, Female Iron Man? That’s Great, But When Will There Be An Obese, Lactose Intolerant Hulk?

A Black, Female Iron Man? That's Great, But When Will There Be An Obese, Lactose Intolerant Hulk?

A Black, Female Iron Man? That's Grea…
Marvel isn’t doing as good of a job adding diversity as they think they are.
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Why it’s great to have Jessica Chastain in your corner

“The best movies are the ones that when you leave the theater, your opinion about them keeps evolving.”


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Lamar Odom Says Khloé Kardashian Will Be A Great Mom: ‘She Took Care Of Me For Four Years’

Lamar Odom joins Access Live’s Kit Hoover and guest co-host Scott Evans and raves about his ex Khloé Kardashian, saying she’ll be a great mom. Plus, he reacts to Kylie Jenner’s baby news. And, he shares his happiest memories with Khloé.


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Julia Louis Dreyfus boasts about ‘great results’ after cancer surgery

Julia Louis-Dreyfus is giddy over “great results” after undergoing surgery related to her battle against breast cancer.


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Viola Davis is an acting great but says she doesn’t get paid like one

Viola Davis is one of the most revered and decorated actresses in Hollywood, but the star of stage and screen says her paychecks and opportunities don’t necessarily reflect her esteemed position.


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Not for Yoga: Sporty, Street-Styled Clothes Great for Travel

A secret to packing light is multi-purpose, multi-wear clothing that can stand up to all kinds of demands. Sure, you could wear your workout apparel on your next trip, but only kids can get away with dressing like scrubs at the airport. Better, find clothes that look like they’re for the street but perform like they’re at the gym. Lululemon, the Canadian brand until recently mainly associated with yoga, has the answer. All their products have the benefits of being sports-ready gear, but several of their pieces work well for the street, too. Lululemon uses tech fabrics and body mapping to ensure their clothes perform well no matter the stress you put them under — and that includes being shoehorned into the middle seat on a cross-country red-eye. Here are some essentials from Lululemon that can assure you both look and feel good when you arrive.

The post Not for Yoga: Sporty, Street-Styled Clothes Great for Travel appeared first on Men's Journal.

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The Great American Slut Off 6

We Love The Red, White, And Pink!

We’re searching for the sexiest, nastiest in the U.S. It’s a really dirty job but we love doing it!

Watch the Full Length, High Quality Movie!

We Love The Red, White, And Pink! We’re searching for the sexiest, nastiest in the U.S. It’s a really dirty job but we love doing it!

Stars: Britney Amber Tiffany Tyler

Categories: High Definition Threeway All Sex Natural Breasts Amateur

Scene Number: 4

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Studio Name: Immoral Productions

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Edith Wharton: 14 Great Novels (Book Center) – Edith Wharton & Red Deer Classics

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Edith Wharton: 14 Great Novels (Book Center)

Edith Wharton & Red Deer Classics

Genre: Art & Architecture

Publish Date: January 22, 2018

Publisher: Oregan Publishing

Seller: Bookwire GmbH


This edition has been professionally formatted and contains several tables of contents. The first table of contents (at the very beginning of the ebook) lists the titles of all novels included in this volume. By clicking on one of those titles you will be redirected to the beginning of that work, where you'll find a new TOC that lists all the chapters and sub-chapters of that specific work. ` `•Fast and Loose, 1877 •The Touchstone, 1900 •The Valley of Decision, 1902 •Sanctuary, 1903 •The House of Mirth, 1905 •Madame de Treymes, 1907 •The Fruit of the Tree, 1907 •Ethan Frome, 1911 •The Reef, 1912 •The Custom of the Country, 1913 •Summer, 1917 •The Marne, 1918 •The Age of Innocence, 1920 (Pulitzer Prize winner) •The Glimpses of the Moon, 1922 Free audiobooks available for: •Fast and Loose, 1877 – not available as audiobook at this time •The Touchstone, 1900 •The Valley of Decision, 1902 •Sanctuary, 1903 •The House of Mirth, 1905 •Madame de Treymes, 1907 •The Fruit of the Tree, 1907 •Ethan Frome, 1911 •The Reef, 1912 •The Custom of the Country, 1913 •Summer, 1917 •The Marne, 1918 •The Age of Innocence, 1920 (Pulitzer Prize winner) •The Glimpses of the Moon, 1922

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The Great Summit: Complete Sessions (Deluxe Edition) – Louis Armstrong & Duke Ellington

Louis Armstrong & Duke Ellington - The Great Summit: Complete Sessions (Deluxe Edition)  artwork

The Great Summit: Complete Sessions (Deluxe Edition)

Louis Armstrong & Duke Ellington

Genre: Jazz

Price: $ 12.99

Release Date: December 31, 1989

© ℗ 2000 Roulette Jazz (R) is a registered trademark of Parlophone Records Ltd. (P) 2000 Parlophone Records, Ltd.

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How Fall’s Coolest Boot Collaboration Was Inspired by the Great Outdoors

It’s hard to grow up in California and not develop a love for the great outdoors. No matter what part of the Golden State you live in, you’re generally only two hours away from a completely different climate experience, whether it’s the sandy shores of Huntington Beach, the snowy slopes of Big Bear, or the sunny countryside in Ojai. And fashion designer Phillip Lim, who’s from a town in Orange County called Westminster, can remember wearing UGG boots in all three places.

The post How Fall's Coolest Boot Collaboration Was Inspired by the Great Outdoors appeared first on Men's Journal.

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The Great Book of Pub Trivia: Hilarious Pub Quiz and Bar Trivia Questions (Unabridged) – Bill O’Neill

Bill O'Neill - The Great Book of Pub Trivia: Hilarious Pub Quiz and Bar Trivia Questions (Unabridged)  artwork

The Great Book of Pub Trivia: Hilarious Pub Quiz and Bar Trivia Questions (Unabridged)

Bill O’Neill

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 14.95

Publish Date: December 19, 2017

© ℗ © 2017 LAK Publishing

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Ryan Seacrest: Mariah Carey will be back in such a big great way

The singer will perform again on Dick Clark’s New Year’s Rockin’ Eve with Ryan Seacrest 2018.” Rough cut (no reporter narration)


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E-40: I Love Jimmy Garoppolo, Next Great 49ers QB!

[[tmz:video id=”0_u7jaz84s”]] Is Jimmy Garoppolo gonna be the next big thing for the 49ers? YUP. Like, as big as Joe Montana or Steve Young?? YUP.  That’s E-40 — a HUGE 49ers fan — weighing in on the hottest QB in football … after…

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‘Great American Baking Show’ pulled amid Johnny Iuzzini allegations

ABC has pulled “The Great American Baking Show” after one of the show’s judges was accused of sexual misconduct.


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Conor McGregor Takes Dee Devlin On Louis Vuitton Shopping Spree, Great Timing!

What do you do when everyone in the world thinks you’re trying to bang Rita Ora??  If you’re Conor McGregor … you take your REAL girlfriend on a luxury shopping spree!! Check out the UFC superstar and Dee Devlin leaving the LV store in NYC with…

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You’re Not That Great: (but neither is anyone else) (Unabridged) – Elan Gale

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You’re Not That Great: (but neither is anyone else) (Unabridged)

Elan Gale

Genre: Comedy

Price: $ 24.95

Publish Date: December 5, 2017

© ℗ © 2017 Hachette Audio

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How great would Derrick Rose have been if he never got hurt?

Frustration from injuries might lead the former MVP to walk away from basketball. What might have been had he never lost his elite explosion?
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Great Disturbance in the Force

Great Disturbance in the Force

Great Disturbance in the Force 0:32
Last November 8 there was a great disturbance in the Force.
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Pop Shop Podcast: Cheat Codes on Fetty Wap’s Surprise Verse on ‘Feels Great’ & Their Cash-Spraying Concert Gigs

Welcome to the new episode of the Billboard Pop Shop Podcast, your one-stop-shop for all things pop on Billboard's weekly charts. In addition,…
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‘Great British Bake Off’ judge Prue Leith spoils finale

“The Great British Bake Off” judge Prue Leith took some heat after she revealed what went on in the kitchen.


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17 Great Aussie Songs For Australian Music Month: Kylie, Nick Cave, Go-Betweens, AC/DC & More

November is a glorious time Down Under. It’s stinking hot, though afternoon storms bring welcome relief. The cricket season hits off, surf…
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From Snapshots to Great Shots with DSLR, Compact & Bridge Camera – B. BoNo Novosad

B. BoNo Novosad - From Snapshots to Great Shots with DSLR, Compact & Bridge Camera  artwork

From Snapshots to Great Shots with DSLR, Compact & Bridge Camera

Take a Total Picture Control

B. BoNo Novosad

Genre: Photography

Publish Date: January 1, 2014

Publisher: Total Picture Control

Seller: ecomVia s.r.o.


The author of this e-book is a a long-term photography tutor and following his daily experience, he has created a one-of-a-kind method of education through a set of simple and joyful exercises along with a necessary theory that will teach you how to start taking perfect shots. With this e-book you will never want to use an automatic mode on your digital camera again. A feedback of your practical knowledge got from this e-book will appear instantly – in a form of perfect shots on a memory card in your digital camera.  This e-book will guide your through following fields of issues: – how to work with lenses and what lens to choose and in what situation – how to master the important settings of your digital camera – how to set the correct values of exposure time – how to get advantage of the aperture – how to set the correct value of ISO This e-book is removing the gap between a fresh owner of a digital camera and perfect digital images. 

iTunes Store: Top Free Books in Arts & Entertainment

Monster Mash-Up: 13 Great songs for Halloween

A monster mash-up of songs that are a graveyard smash
News, reviews, interviews and more for top artists and albums – MSN Music
ADULT ENTERTAINMENT NEWS UPDATE:Gabby Love’s top pick! Click and enjoy!

The Great Gasbag: An A-Z Study Guide to Surviving Trump World (Unabridged) – Joy Behar

Joy Behar - The Great Gasbag: An A-Z Study Guide to Surviving Trump World (Unabridged)  artwork

The Great Gasbag: An A-Z Study Guide to Surviving Trump World (Unabridged)

Joy Behar

Genre: Comedy

Price: $ 19.95

Publish Date: October 24, 2017

© ℗ © 2017 Harper Audio

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The Roaring 20s – Songs & Melodies from the Great Gatsby Era: The Twenties – Various Artists

Various Artists - The Roaring 20s - Songs & Melodies from the Great Gatsby Era: The Twenties  artwork

The Roaring 20s – Songs & Melodies from the Great Gatsby Era: The Twenties

Various Artists

Genre: Jazz

Price: $ 5.99

Release Date: August 3, 2013

© ℗ 2013 Reader’s Digest

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Johnny Mathis Sings the Great New American Songbook – Johnny Mathis

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Johnny Mathis Sings the Great New American Songbook

Johnny Mathis

Genre: Pop

Price: $ 10.99

Release Date: September 29, 2017

© ℗ 2017 Jon Mat Records, Inc.

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Into the Great Wide Open – Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers

Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers - Into the Great Wide Open  artwork

Into the Great Wide Open

Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers

Genre: Rock

Price: $ 5.99

Release Date: July 2, 1991

© ℗ 2014 Geffen Records

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Great Expectations – Alfonso Cuarón

Alfonso Cuarón - Great Expectations  artwork

Great Expectations

Alfonso Cuarón

Genre: Drama

Price: $ 4.99

Rental Price: $ 3.99

Release Date: May 21, 2002


Loosely based on the classic Charles Dickens novel, Great Expectations is a sensual tale of a young man's unforgettable passage into manhood and the three individuals who will change his life forever. Through the surprising interactions of these vivid characters, Great Expectations takes a unique and contemporary look at life's great coincidences.

© © 1998 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation.

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How Fall’s Coolest Boot Collaboration Was Inspired by the Great Outdoors

It’s hard to grow up in California and not develop a love for the great outdoors. No matter what part of the Golden State you live in, you’re generally only two hours away from a completely different climate experience, whether it’s the sandy shores of

This article originally appeared on www.mensjournal.com: How Fall’s Coolest Boot Collaboration Was Inspired by the Great Outdoors

Men’s Journal Latest Style News

Into the great wide open: Remembering Tom Petty

Iconic rocker Tom Petty, known for such hits as ‘Free Fallin” and ‘Refugee’ has died after suffering cardiac arrest in his Malibu, California home. Lisa Bernhard reports.


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The Best of Pantera: Far Beyond the Great Southern Cowboys’ Vulgar Hits! (Remastered) – Pantera

Pantera - The Best of Pantera: Far Beyond the Great Southern Cowboys' Vulgar Hits! (Remastered)  artwork

The Best of Pantera: Far Beyond the Great Southern Cowboys’ Vulgar Hits! (Remastered)

Pantera

Genre: Metal

Price: $ 4.99

Release Date: September 23, 2003

© ℗ 2003 Elektra Entertainment Group. Manufactured and Distributed by Rhino Entertainment Group, a Warner Music Group company

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Duets II: The Great Performances – Tony Bennett

Tony Bennett - Duets II: The Great Performances  artwork

Duets II: The Great Performances

Tony Bennett

Genre: Concert Films

Price: $ 12.99

Release Date: March 6, 2012

© © 2012 Sony Music Entertainment

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Chester Bennington’s Widow Posts Video of Him in Great Mood with Family 36 Hours Before Suicide

[[tmz:video id=”0_y0gzev8i”]] Chester Bennington appeared happy and engaged with his own family less than 2 days before his hanging suicide … based on a video his widow shared. Talinda Bennington posted a video of Chester hanging out with one of his…

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Not for Yoga: Sporty, Street-Styled Clothes Great for Travel

A secret to packing light is multi-purpose, multi-wear clothing that can stand up to all kinds of demands. Sure, you could wear your workout apparel on your next trip, but only kids can get away with dressing like scrubs at the airport. Better, find clothes that look like they’re for the street but perform like they’re at the gym.

This article originally appeared on www.mensjournal.com: Not for Yoga: Sporty, Street-Styled Clothes Great for Travel

Men’s Journal Latest Style News

How to Think Like a Great Graphic Designer (Unabridged) – Debbie Millman

Debbie Millman - How to Think Like a Great Graphic Designer (Unabridged)  artwork

How to Think Like a Great Graphic Designer (Unabridged)

Debbie Millman

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 11.95

Publish Date: May 29, 2013

© ℗ © 2013 Audible Studios

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‘Silver Springs’: Inside Fleetwood Mac’s Great Lost Breakup Anthem

As Fleetwood Mac's live classic 'The Dance' turns 20, we look back at Stevie Nicks' wrenching "Silver Springs" – and how it almost broke up the band.
News, reviews, interviews and more for top artists and albums – MSN Music
ADULT ENTERTAINMENT NEWS UPDATE:Gabby Love’s top pick! Click and enjoy!

The Great Hunt: Book Two of the Wheel of Time (Unabridged) – Robert Jordan

Robert Jordan - The Great Hunt: Book Two of the Wheel of Time (Unabridged)  artwork

The Great Hunt: Book Two of the Wheel of Time (Unabridged)

Robert Jordan

Genre: Sci Fi & Fantasy

Price: $ 28.95

Publish Date: May 4, 2004

© ℗ © 2004 Macmillan Audio

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Jimmy Kimmel’s infant son is ‘doing great’

Jimmy Kimmel has no regrets about crying on national television.


CNN.com – RSS Channel – Entertainment

GamersGate: The World's Largest Online Game Store

Great video with Melanie in very sexy revealing college uniform

Dont you wish you was at college with Melanie

To see more videos of Melanie click here

Hi guys

I bet you wish I went to your college 😉 This uniform is very revealing, the miniskirt is very short! I loved wearing this little crop top with a college tie and thigh high socks for this video

You should head over to my website www.onlymelanie.com to view my videos… I will be waiting for you

Luv Mel xx

OnlyMelanie’s Blog

5 Great Date Night Ideas for Couples Who Are Movie Buffs

Movie buffs fashion themselves to be quite the astute individuals, a beautiful combination of intelligence, taste, and an appreciation of all this artistic. It is quite the event when one movie aficionado finds themselves face-to-face with their match.
Relationships:Dating Articles from EzineArticles.com

The Great Wall – Zhang Yimou

Zhang Yimou - The Great Wall  artwork

The Great Wall

Zhang Yimou

Genre: Action & Adventure

Price: $ 7.99

Release Date: December 29, 2016


Starring global superstar Matt Damon and directed by one of the most breathtaking visual stylists of our time, Zhang Yimou (Hero, House of Flying Daggers), Legendary's The Great Wall tells the story of an elite force making a valiant stand for humanity on the world's most iconic structure. The first English-language production for Yimou is the largest film ever shot entirely in China. The Great Wall also stars Jing Tian, Pedro Pascal, Willem Dafoe, and Andy Lau.

© © 2016 Universal Studios. All Rights Reserved.

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The Best Scalp Products for Great Hair: Oribe, Christophe Robin, and More

Enviable hair starts at the roots. Dermatologist Francesca Fusco, M.D., explains the science behind a healthy scalp.
Vogue
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Chris Bosh Mulling NBA Return, My Health Is Great!

[[tmz:video id=”0_m3uub4ql”]] What’s next for Chris Bosh? “Basketball and stuff.” That’s what he told TMZ Sports outside Coral Tree Cafe in L.A. moments ago — advising his fans not to close the book on his NBA career just yet. “Health is great, feeling…

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3 Great Date Night Movie Genres That Aren’t Rom-Coms

We live in a fairly busy day & age, and one of the hardest things to do is spend quality time with each other. While it’s easy to turn this into a discussion on social constructs and the absence of communication between individuals, it’s also a time to think of one of the great byproducts of our busy world — “date night” and date night movies. Even if the week has been hectic, we know we can look forward to at least one night to let our hair down & have fun.
Relationships:Dating Articles from EzineArticles.com

Sports News in Brief: Furious Rick Pitino Adamant Media Trying To Tarnish Name Of Great Escort Service

LOUISVILLE, KY—Following the publication of a book alleging that a member of the school’s basketball department paid women to perform sex acts for recruits, furious University of Louisville head coach Rick Pitino told reporters Wednesday that the media was trying to tarnish the name of a great escort service. “No one, I repeat no one, in the Cardinals community has anything but good things to say about these ladies, and it’s absolutely shameful to see their names get dragged through the mud,” said an enraged Pitino, blasting news outlets for maliciously attacking the reputation of a highly regarded, hardworking escort service. “To say I’m disgusted and disappointed with the way the press has recklessly tried to cast aspersions on this escort service would be an understatement. Say what you will about me, I’m the coach of this team, but I won’t stand for the …




The Onion

Great Performances – Strauss: Til Eulenspiegel’s Merry Pranks, Don Juan, Death and Transfiguration – Cleveland Orchestra & George Szell

Cleveland Orchestra & George Szell - Great Performances - Strauss: Til Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks, Don Juan, Death and Transfiguration  artwork

Great Performances – Strauss: Til Eulenspiegel’s Merry Pranks, Don Juan, Death and Transfiguration

Cleveland Orchestra & George Szell

Genre: Classical

Price: $ 2.99

Release Date: December 31, 1956

© ℗ Originally released 1957 SONY BMG MUSIC ENTERTAINMENT

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The Great Muppet Caper – The Muppets

The Muppets - The Great Muppet Caper  artwork

The Great Muppet Caper

The Muppets

Genre: Kids & Family

Price: $ 9.99

Rental Price: $ 2.99

Release Date: June 26, 1981


Stop the presses! The crime of the century has occurred, and investigative reporters Kermit, Fozzie and Gonzo are out to crack the case in this song-filled, star-studded extravaganza directed by the legendary Jim Henson. Our heroes arrive in London to interview Lady Holiday (Diana Rigg), a high-fashion designer whose priceless diamond necklace has just been stolen. But when Kermit mistakes lovely receptionist/would-be model Miss Piggy for her aristocratic employer, it's love at first sight. Unfortunately, Lady Holiday's scheming brother (Charles Grodin) is also wooing the sultry swine – so he can frame her for another brazen jewel heist! Now it's up to Kermit and his Muppet pals to clear Piggy's name and catch the real culprits. Packed with music, remarkable production numbers and hilarious cameo performances (including John Cleese, Peter Falk, Jack Warden, Robert Morley and Peter Ustinov), this restored and remastered edition of The Great Muppet Caper is the wackiest story!

© © 1981 Henson Associates, Inc.

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The Great Gatsby – F. Scott Fitzgerald

F. Scott Fitzgerald - The Great Gatsby  artwork

The Great Gatsby

F. Scott Fitzgerald

Genre: Classics

Publish Date: April 19, 2015

Publisher: Wellington

Seller: Books Ponce de Leon


Fitzgerald once said:  “It is sadder to find the past again and find it inadequate to the present than it is to have it elude you and remain forever a harmonious conception of memory” ••• EXCLUSIVE!! DOWNLOAD NOW!! ••• ••• BESTSELLERS FOR A GREAT PRICE!••• A portrait of the Jazz Age in all of its decadence and excess, The Great Gatsby captured the spirit of the author's generation and earned itself a permanent place in American mythology. Self-made, self-invented millionaire Jay Gatsby embodies some of Fitzgerald's–and his country's–most abiding obsessions: money, ambition, greed, and the promise of new beginnings. "Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgiastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that's no matter–tomorrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther…. And one fine morning–"Gatsby's rise to glory and eventual fall from grace becomes a kind of cautionary tale about the American Dream. Enjoy the Book!

iTunes Store: Top Free Books in Fiction & Literature

Is There Anybody Out There? – A Great Big World

A Great Big World - Is There Anybody Out There?  artwork

Is There Anybody Out There?

A Great Big World

Genre: Pop

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: January 17, 2014

© ℗ 2013, 2014 Epic Records, a division of Sony Music Entertainment

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The Great Gatsby – F. Scott Fitzgerald

F. Scott Fitzgerald - The Great Gatsby  artwork

The Great Gatsby

F. Scott Fitzgerald

Genre: Classics

Publish Date: April 19, 2015

Publisher: Wellington Corp.

Seller: Carbon Publishing


Fitzgerald once said:  “It is sadder to find the past again and find it inadequate to the present than it is to have it elude you and remain forever a harmonious conception of memory” ••• EXCLUSIVE!! DOWNLOAD NOW!! ••• ••• BESTSELLERS FOR A GREAT PRICE!••• A portrait of the Jazz Age in all of its decadence and excess, The Great Gatsby captured the spirit of the author's generation and earned itself a permanent place in American mythology. Self-made, self-invented millionaire Jay Gatsby embodies some of Fitzgerald's–and his country's–most abiding obsessions: money, ambition, greed, and the promise of new beginnings. "Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgiastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that's no matter–tomorrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther…. And one fine morning–"Gatsby's rise to glory and eventual fall from grace becomes a kind of cautionary tale about the American Dream. Enjoy the Book!

iTunes Store: Top Free Books in Fiction & Literature

7 Weird Tricks for Looking Great in Photos

There’s a reason why celebrities look amazing in photos. OK, there are a lot of reasons: They’re genetically blessed, they have a glam team…The list goes on. But they also know some little tricks for posing—that anyone can try—that make any picture super-flattering. You know who else knows them? The mastermind behind all of Allure‘s celebrity cover shoots, our creative director and all-around fashion world boss Paul Cavaco. We asked him to spill his secrets to looking fantastic in pictures.
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MillionaireMatch.com - the best dating site for sexy, successful singles!
MillionaireMatch.com – the best dating site for sexy, successful singles!

Elements of Jazz: From Cakewalks to Fusion – The Great Courses

The Great Courses - Elements of Jazz: From Cakewalks to Fusion  artwork

Elements of Jazz: From Cakewalks to Fusion

The Great Courses

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 9.95

Publish Date: September 11, 1995

© ℗ © 1995 The Great Courses

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The Great Ground Beef Scare of 2015: 5 Easy Ways to Protect Yourself

You may have read the (terrifying) news this week that following extensive testing of 300 packages of ground beef from retailers spanning big-box supermarkets to natural food stores in 26 cities around the country, Consumer…


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Pink Wine Panic: Today’s the One Year Anniversary of the Great Hamptons Rose Shortage #NeverForget

It's only been one year since the Great Hamptons Rose Shortage of 2014—but oh, how easy it is to forget. Last year's pink wine panic had swishy Long Island seaside towns fraught with uncertainty. Page…


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Define the Great Line – Underoath

Underoath - Define the Great Line  artwork

Define the Great Line

Underoath

Genre: Metal

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: June 20, 2006

© ℗ 2006 Capitol Christian Music Group. All rights reserved. Unauthorized reproduction is a violation of applicable laws. Manufactured by Capitol Christian Music Group,

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From Snapshots to Great Shots with DSLR, Compact & Bridge Camera – B. BoNo Novosad

B. BoNo Novosad - From Snapshots to Great Shots with DSLR, Compact & Bridge Camera  artwork

From Snapshots to Great Shots with DSLR, Compact & Bridge Camera

Take a Total Picture Control

B. BoNo Novosad

Genre: Photography

Publish Date: January 1, 2014

Publisher: Total Picture Control

Seller: ECOMVIA A S


The author of this e-book is a a long-term photography tutor and following his daily experience, he has created a one-of-a-kind method of education through a set of simple and joyful exercises along with a necessary theory that will teach you how to start taking perfect shots. With this e-book you will never want to use an automatic mode on your digital camera again. A feedback of your practical knowledge got from this e-book will appear instantly – in a form of perfect shots on a memory card in your digital camera.  This e-book will guide your through following fields of issues: – how to work with lenses and what lens to choose and in what situation – how to master the important settings of your digital camera – how to set the correct values of exposure time – how to get advantage of the aperture – how to set the correct value of ISO This e-book is removing the gap between a fresh owner of a digital camera and perfect digital images. 

iTunes Store: Top Free Books in Arts & Entertainment

The Great American Blues: Chicago, Illinois – Various Artists

Various Artists - The Great American Blues: Chicago, Illinois  artwork

The Great American Blues: Chicago, Illinois

Various Artists

Genre: Blues

Price: $ 5.99

Release Date: January 29, 2013

© ℗ 2013 X5 Music Group

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Blues

The Great American Blues: Memphis, Tennessee – Various Artists

Various Artists - The Great American Blues: Memphis, Tennessee  artwork

The Great American Blues: Memphis, Tennessee

Various Artists

Genre: Blues

Price: $ 5.99

Release Date: January 29, 2013

© ℗ 2013 X5 Music Group

iTunes Store: Top Albums in Blues

Great Emergency of 1967

When a family lives across the street from one another for over 48 years, you are going to face some difficult times together, celebrate happy times together, and then you will have those dreaded times to get through together…the emergencies.

For the Hitchcock & Sanders Families of Montgomery, AL, it was the Great Emergency of 1967 that we all remember.

But I am getting ahead of myself. Our house was unique in that there were no ‘boy’ or ‘girl’ jobs….there were so many of us that we all just did whatever needed to be done. Early in May of 1967 was the year that John was born. Was that the great emergency? No, he just joined the rest of the pack. Late in May of 1967 Mother had to go back to the hospital for some problems that developed. Was that the Great Emergency of 1967? Nope. But it did happen while she was at the hospital. Here was Daddy who mowed lawns, cooked like all get out, had no trouble doing anything at all…….

4:17 AM. Daddy dials the Sander’s home. Grace answers.

“Grace,” Daddy whispered, “I have an emergency. Can you come right over?
2015-08-20-1440037772-9041733-GRACE.jpg
Grace slid into her scuffies, threw on the old chenille bathrobe and flew across the street, sure that something was wrong with Mom and what could it be? She couldn’t be dead….and about that time she hit the back door and flew into the kitchen.

Daddy was standing there with John. “Bill what’s going on with Pat? What’s the emergency?”

Daddy looked sheepish. “Grace, there is no other way to say it but I can’t change a Number Two Diaper.”

He obviously was embarrassed and didn’t want anyone to know that he had had to call Grace and she changed John’s Number Two Diaper…..so obviously that had to become Grace’s favorite story. All families have favorite stories….whether they are blood kin or chosen kin. Thank goodness we have both kinds.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.




Comedy – The Huffington Post
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Back-to-school Style: 10 Great Dresses

A great dress is an easy back-to-school option — paired with sandals, sneakers or boots and a cross-body or hobo bag, it’s instantly, effortlessly chic. As the weather cools, layering with tights and a fitted denim jacket or a slouchy boyfriend sweater will give any of these styles months of staying power.

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The Great Gatsby – F. Scott Fitzgerald

F. Scott Fitzgerald - The Great Gatsby  artwork

The Great Gatsby

F. Scott Fitzgerald

Genre: Classics

Publish Date: May 18, 2015

Publisher: Hrivik Publishing

Seller: Hrivik Publishing


The exemplary novel of the Jazz Age, F. Scott Fitzgeralds' third book, The Great Gatsby (1925), stands as the supreme achievement of his career. T. S. Eliot read it three times and saw it as the “first step” American fiction had taken since Henry James; H. L. Mencken praised “the charm and beauty of the writing,” as well as Fitzgerald's sharp social sense; and Thomas Wolfe hailed it as Fitzgerald's “best work” thus far. The story of the fabulously wealthy Jay Gatsby and his love for the beautiful Daisy Buchanan, of lavish parties on Long Island at a time when, The New York Times remarked, “gin was the national drink and sex the national obsession,” it is an exquisitely crafted tale of America in the 1920s that resonates with the power of myth. A novel of lyrical beauty yet brutal realism, of magic, romance, and mysticism, The Great Gatsby is one of the great classics of twentieth-century literature. Quotes from the book: “I hope she'll be a fool — that's the best thing a girl can be in this world, a beautiful little fool.” “And I like large parties. They’re so intimate. At small parties there isn’t any privacy.” “There are only the pursued, the pursuing, the busy and the tired.” Readers' reviews: “The Great Gatsby is your neighbor you're best friends with until you find out he's a drug dealer. It charms you with some of the most elegant English prose ever published, making it difficult to discuss the novel without the urge to stammer awestruck about its beauty.” (Alex, goodreads.com) “Most Americans are assigned to read this novel in high school. Few American high schoolers have the wherewithal to appreciate this novel in full. I certainly did not. It is on a shortlist of novels that should, every 5 years starting at age 25, return to any American's required reading list.” (Jason, goodreads.com) “'The Great Gatsby' is considered by many to be the zenith of American fiction writing in the last century. I won't say that it is the best American novel I've read but I will say it is probably the most perfect.” (Rolls, goodreads.com)

iTunes Store: Top Free Books in Fiction & Literature

Great Expectations – Charles Dickens

Charles Dickens - Great Expectations  artwork

Great Expectations

Charles Dickens

Genre: Classics

Publish Date: December 17, 2010

Publisher: Bookbyte Digital

Seller: Somerset Investments, Inc.


Charles Dickens' classic tells the coming-of-age story of Pip, the orphan who rose from miserable destitution to great wealth, with the help of a mysterious benefactor. For better or worse, Pip's life is defined through his relationships with Dickens' trademark complex supporting cast: Estella, a fellow orphan with whom Pip is infatuated; Miss Havisham, the manipulative and wealthy spinster; Joe Gargery, the closest thing to a parent Pip has ever known; a pair of escaped convicts; and many, many more.

iTunes Store: Top Free Books in Fiction & Literature

Can’t Control the Weather – A Few Pointers to Keep Those Lo cks Looking Great on the Road

I did a column here last week about keeping our hair looking great in high humidity. We run into that ‘wall of water’ when we land in Miami, for example, or New York City in August … “Oh, man!” Hot and wet!

Part of the solution is that you just have to surrender some of that control. It is so difficult to keep the look you created in L.A. when you step off the plane in Atlanta. Depending on our natural hair, it can go flat and limp or wildly curly and frizzy.

Still, “be prepared,” pack your hair tools, favorite products and hair accessories along with a healthy dose of flexibility.

I recently traveled and forgot my conditioner and thought, “no big deal. How bad could hotel products be?” Well, they can be harsh on hair and, “yes,” they smell absolutely delicious and they suds-up like none other but be careful. Sometimes products with suds use a lot of sulfates, which can be hard on hair, especially if your hair has been chemically treated for a perm or coloring.

• My suggestion is to take travel-size products with you from home. Go to your favorite drug store and buy the small, plastic, airplane-approved, 3.4 oz. bottles and put your trusted products in them.

• When you head for another city, always pack a selection of hair accessories, including barrettes, which are trending strong, and ponytail holds and favorite hair clips. These are incredibly useful in taming hair when you’ve already tried hair mousse and gels. The variety of styles and availability is better than ever. Ponytails, buns and other updos work in virtually every environment from the boardroom to the gym. When you hit that wave of high humidity, a ponytail is a great way to go in a slick-back wet look.

• Humidity and free bath samples aren’t the only risks when traveling. Water is different everywhere. Some is soft and some is hard with lots of minerals. Those minerals can leave deposits on your hair, changing the texture or feel. Using your quality products from home can help this a lot. When you get home, detox your hair, wash it with a clarifying shampoo or a mix of baking soda and water. This will strip the hair of mineral build-up. Then apply a deep, penetrating mask or deep conditioner and let it sit on your hair for a good amount of time … Your hair will love you for it!

Remember, you can’t beat the weather, and you don’t pick the water coming out of the shower, so be flexible and patient out of town.

As always, be open to change!

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.




Style – The Huffington Post
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David Howard Presents a Great Ballet Class With Pianist Joe Cross – David Howard

David Howard - David Howard Presents a Great Ballet Class With Pianist Joe Cross  artwork

David Howard Presents a Great Ballet Class With Pianist Joe Cross

David Howard

Genre: Classical

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: June 23, 2014

© ℗ 2014 Roper Records

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Great Distance (feat. Chelly) – EP – ryo (supercell)


Great Distance (feat. Chelly) – EP
ryo (supercell)

Release Date:
August 6, 2015
Total Songs:
4

Genre:
World

Price:
$ 5.16

Copyright
℗ 2015 Sony Music Records


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BBC’s ‘Great British Bake Off’ Draws Best-Ever Season Launch Ratings


The baking competition has started its second season on the U.K. public broadcaster’s flagship network BBC One.

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International

Why the End of Trends Is Great for Ethical Fashion and Terrible for Fast Fashion

One of the main drivers of the incredibly wasteful (some would say killer) fast-fashion business has been trends. I mean, if you are unconscious of the social and environmental impacts of supercheap clothes and just want to keep up with what’s new and hot, the simplest solution is to buy a couple haul’s worth of cheap, not-made-to-last clothes each season and toss them when the trends change.

But interestingly, we are now entering an era (fashion insiders would say that it has been going on for a few seasons now) where trends just don’t dominate like they used to. We are more free than ever to figure out what works for us, our lifestyles and our bodies.

And that means that fast fashion is no longer necessary.

I’ve always been a slave to 70s cuts (they suit my personality, and my shape), but when I was younger, I had to wait for the “boho” look to come and go, and I can’t tell you how bummed I was when skinny pants became the thing. But now you can log onto almost any fashion site and find both skinny jeans and bellbottoms for sale right next to each other!

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This ditching of trends means we can start investing in great pieces that flatter us year in and year out (or better yet, get our clothes tailored! I predict perfect fitting clothes will be the new black in coming years.) And support businesses who are making clothes ethically.

We don’t need fast fashion, and its earth-poisoning, people-abusing ways if we get to dress in the way that’s best suited to who we are instead of following trends that mean you wear something once and toss it.

This is especially true because we’re no longer limited to clothes on offer at the local mall or downtown, so our style isn’t limited in that way, either. Now you find such an incredible variety of wares online, from mainstream fashion retailers to higher-end fashion shops, to boutiques that fit every fancy.

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For example, I like my clothes ethical, edgy and not super-girly but classically feminine, so I love Beklina (above), Kaight and A Boy Named Sue and I do the majority of my shopping online at those shops, stopping by every month or so to see what’s new.

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Eshakti offers customized clothing, so if you like a dress, you can get the shorter version of it, or one with capped sleeves so you can wear it to work. Freaking brilliant, and they offer a genuine range of sizes.

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Speaking of which, if you’re plus-sized, you have virtual shops that offer genuinely cool clothes like Modcloth, ASOS Curve and Ideeli .

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There is literally something for everyone. Want to share quirky, made-in-san-francisco clothes with your guy? Betabrand offers tons of crossover pieces; I share the above Mary-Go-Round pants with my partner and we BOTH get compliments.

And forget it if you like vintage pieces; I could spend days trolling my favorite vintage shops on Etsy — growing up I only had my grandma’s closet and my local Salvation Army.

My wardrobe is actually something I now LOVE; because I only buy pieces that I adore, because many of my clothes are 5 or more years old, and I know exactly how to work them and because I no longer have to deal with trends.

It makes it SO much easier to get dressed in the morning when you actually like your clothes and aren’t trying to follow trends.

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The Great American Slut Off 6

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The Great American Slut Off 6

We Love The Red, White, And Pink!

We’re searching for the sexiest, nastiest in the U.S. It’s a really dirty job but we love doing it!

Watch the Full Length, High Quality Movie!

We Love The Red, White, And Pink! We’re searching for the sexiest, nastiest in the U.S. It’s a really dirty job but we love doing it!

Stars: Hydii Mae Emily Austin Jayden Lee Ashley Graham Porno Dan Britney Amber Tiffany Tyler

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Angry Nerd – What Makes “Doctor Who” Great Are the Sidekicks, Not the Time Lord

Scripts for upcoming episodes of Doctor Who have leaked online, but should you read them before they air? It doesn’t matter! The scripts aren’t the secret to the Doctor’s longevity. It’s the companions that make or break any given episode, arc, or season, and Angry Nerd can prove it.
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Something Great (Something Great #1) – M. Clarke

M. Clarke - Something Great (Something Great #1)  artwork

Something Great (Something Great #1)

Something Great (Something Great #1)

M. Clarke

Genre: Contemporary

Publish Date: July 21, 2013

Publisher: M. Clarke

Seller: Smashwords


She didn’t know what she was missing…until he found her. Maxwell Knight was positively trouble, dangerously good-looking, and seductively charming. He was everything Jenna didn’t need in her life. Only Max didn’t see it that way. His pursuit was relentless, making Jenna even more determined to push him away.

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Hold Each Other – Single – A Great Big World


Hold Each Other – Single
A Great Big World

Release Date:
July 22, 2015
Total Songs:
1

Genre:
Pop

Price:
$ 1.29

Copyright
℗ 2015 Epic Records, a division of Sony Music Entertainment


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Skip the Gym: Five Insta-Workouts That Are Made for the Great Outdoors

Cat McNeil

Who could forget the bone-chilling temperatures that, just a few months back, turned a trip to the gym into a test of iron-willed commitment? Not Gisele Bündchen, who celebrated the sheer joy of an outdoor workout with a wall-climbing snap on Instagram recently. The model is in good company: Early this morning, Cameron Russell was spotted switching up her fitness routine with a set of hanging rings in Santa Monica, while Hannah Bronfman enjoyed the core-strengthening benefits of a day spent kayaking through nature. Not that everyone’s working on a six pack. Case in point: Catherine McNeil offered up the ultimate summer thrill by way of an adrenaline-boosting tandem skydiving jump. Here are a few good reasons why the cure for exercise boredom may be as simple as leaving the house.

The post Skip the Gym: Five Insta-Workouts That Are Made for the Great Outdoors appeared first on Vogue.

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The Good Listener: Where Are All The Great Lullabies?

Tips for finding lullabies that aren’t cloying, annoying, or lullaby-themed covers of pop songs.

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The Allman Brothers Band: Live At Great Woods – The Allman Brothers Band

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The Allman Brothers Band: Live At Great Woods

The Allman Brothers Band

Genre: Concert Films

Price: $ 12.99

Rental Price: $ 2.99

Release Date: February 18, 2014


Recorded in September of 1991, originally for Japanese TV, The Allman Brothers Band’s beloved Live At Great Woods showcases the classic American rock band reaching a new generation of audiences. Original band members Gregg Allman, Dickey Betts, Butch Trucks and Jaimoe were joined by new guitarist Warren Haynes, bassist Allen Woody and percussionist Marc Quiñones in one of the most powerful lineups in the group’s history. This set – recorded before a crowd of nearly 20,000 adoring fans at the Great Woods Center for the Performing Arts in Massachusetts – features a top-notch set of fan favorites, with a fiery acoustic mini-set included for good measure. This release of Live At Great Woods fills a crucial gap in The Allman Brothers Band’s videography: after years of demand, fans can experience the original longform video version of this concert (previously only available on VHS and LaserDisc), with no interruption of the main feature. Finally, fans have nothing standing between them and the top-notch performances of this set.

© © 1991 VideoArts Music, Inc. and Japan Satellite Broadcasting, Inc. Program Copyright 1992, 2014 Epic Records, a division of Sony Music Entertainment

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Great Strauss Waltzes, Polkas & Marches – Orchestra of the Viennese Volksoper

Orchestra of the Viennese Volksoper - Great Strauss Waltzes, Polkas & Marches  artwork

Great Strauss Waltzes, Polkas & Marches

Orchestra of the Viennese Volksoper

Genre: Classical

Price: $ 7.99

Release Date: August 25, 2008

© ℗ 2008 SLG, LLC

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Great Conversations: James Coburn

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I interviewed James Coburn in late 1998 for the cover story of the February 1999 issue of Venice Magazine. I had grown up watching Coburn on the late show, but also seeing him on the big screen, first-run. Meeting him was a thrill as he entered the living room of his manager, the late Hilly Elkins’, home in Beverly Hills. Coburn was elegant, charming and had the grace of a cat. The only thing that revealed the health problems that had nearly done him in were his gnarled hands, the result of severe arthritis. We spoke about his role in Paul Schrader’s newest film, “Affliction,” which would earn him a Best Supporting Actor Academy Award. Later, as I walked Coburn to his Acura NSX sport coupe, he bid me a warm farewell.

Several months later, I encountered him again at The Independent Spirit Awards, in Santa Monica. I went up to greet him and was given a cold shoulder. This was my first experience with interviewing an actor who was a charmer when “working” and then running into him/her in public later and being reminded of my inferior position in the pecking order. I have no idea what was going on with him that day, but being that I was barely 30 years of age, I took his snub very personally, and let it stew for a quite a while. A couple years after that, he approached me at a Venice Magazine party, offering his hand: “Hey there!” he exclaimed. “I never did tell you how much I enjoyed your article.” We chatted for a few more minutes, then went our separate ways. I have no idea if he was being genuine that final time I saw him, or if he was “acting,” and at this point, I don’t care. I got to sit and spend time with one of the screen’s greats who’d worked with the screen’s greats.

Suffice to say, they don’t make ’em like Jim Coburn, cool daddy, anymore.

JAMES COBURN: COOL DADDY

Cool N 1: Self-assurance 2: sophistication
3: calm 4: Poise, composure 5: See Coburn, James.

James Coburn was born August 31, 1928 in Laurel, Nebraska. His father, an auto mechanic, moved the family to Compton, California in the early 30’s at the height of the depression, in hopes of finding a better life for his family. Young Coburn stayed in Compton through high school. Following military service in the Army, Coburn studied acting at Los Angeles City College, USC, and with the legendary Stella Adler in New York. He then returned to Southern California, where he made his stage debut at the La Jolla Playhouse in Billy Budd. Following some work in commercials and live TV, Coburn made his film debut in 1959 in Ride Lonesome, a Budd Boetticher-directed horse opera starring Randolph Scott. He then hit paydirt with his supporting role in the smash hit The Magnificent Seven in 1960, following this with the classic The Great Escape in 1963. Coburn continued doing solid supporting work in film and TV throughout the early 60’s, finally earning leading man status as superspy Derek Flint in Our Man Flint (1966) and In Like Flint (1967). He formed his own production company in 1967, Panpiper, producing the critical and cult favorite The President’s Analyst, a brilliant social and political satire that is now widely regarded as one of the seminal films of the 1960s. Coburn also did three films with ultra-violence guru Sam Peckinpah: Major Dundee (1965), Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid (1973) and the WW II drama Cross of Iron (1977) which showed the war from the German P.O.V., and directed second unit for Peckinpah’s Convoy (1978).

Coburn’s screen persona gave Americans what Sean Connery gave to the English: an urbane, sophisticated hero, who can let loose a one-liner, dry martini or deadly karate chop in the blink of one eye, while winking at us, the audience, with the other. His cat-like grace and steely intensity made him one of the top box office stars of the 60s and 70s, and Coburn still retains a strong following of fans as the 1990s come to a close.

Coburn has appeared in dozens of films. Just a few other noteworthy ones include Don Seigel’s Hell Is For Heroes (1962), Charade (1963), Paddy Chayefsky’s The Americanization of Emily (1964), Sergio Leone’s Duck You Sucker! (1971), Richard Brooks’ Bite the Bullet, and Walter Hill’s Hard Times (both 1975). A near-fatal bout of rheumatoid arthritis slowed Coburn down in the late 70’s, just when he was reaching the peak of his career. After focusing his considerable discipline on building (or re-building) his body, Coburn now happily declares that he is “pain free.” Seeing the silver-maned, elegant Coburn stroll through the garden of the Beverly Hills home where this interview took place, one would never guess this was a man who was near death once upon a time. The lithe, cat-like grace is still there, as is the charm, easy laugh, and ten thousand watt smile that has been captivating the movie-going world for nearly 40 years. The foremost thing on Coburn’s mind these days is his latest film, Paul Schrader’s Affliction. In it, he plays Pop Whitehouse, father to Sheriff Wade Whitehouse (Nick Nolte). Affliction is the searing, much-talked about film that deals with domestic violence as it’s passed down through the generations of a family like a cancerous heirloom. Coburn’s venomous performance has critics and the public alike buzzing “Oscar.” If nominated, it would be a first for Coburn, who, at 70, seems less like an old veteran gunning for a last lap around the track, than a seasoned pro whose powers are every bit at their peak when he enters the ring. There goes the bell. Round one.

Your character Pop Whitehouse is one of the most loathsome villains to grace a movie screen in recent memory. Did you have trouble shaking him off once the picture wrapped?

JAMES COBURN: Not really, because I got it all out. It’s really when you can’t get it out or when you’re doing it on stage and you have to do it over and over again that it can be troubling. But I learned long ago how to get rid of it by doing it! (laughs) You get it out. Villains are really fun to play because they’re usually meatier characters, because they’ve made decisions that haven’t all been very good ones, (laughs) and are paying the price, with a little karma attached. They have something to say, I think. I never play them as a “bad guy.” I play them like I have something to accomplish. In Affliction, it was “I have to get my boys to be men! If they’re not strong men, by God, I’ll beat the shit out of them!” That’s what makes him seem so savage — it’s that conflict. Scripts without conflict are really boring. Characters without conflict are really boring to play, because you’re always trying to catch up with something. And this one was just loaded with conflict. Paul (Schrader) said to Nick and I in the beginning “I’m just gonna let you two guys go after each other!” And we did. We went for it. It was great fun. I’d like to do it all over again.

Is it difficult to go to such a dark place as an actor?

It’s sometimes difficult to find, initially. But as actors, we don’t have to be who we’re playing. That’s one of the good things about being an actor. But, if you let yourself get locked into that, where that character becomes your essence, that’s scary. There was an old film called A Double Life (1947), starring Ronald Coleman, where he became so infected with Othello, that he actually performed it for real, with his own Desdemona. Stella Adler, who I studied with, said “Actors act. They don’t have to be their roles.” On Affliction, we were all joking around between takes, then when we went back to it, boom! We were right back into it again, because it was written so well. It was very straight-on. There was no ambiguity about the characters, and it’s really fun and enriching when that happens. As actors that’s what we try to do, enrich our own beings by absorbing impressions, then generating it out through our craft and giving it to the audience. Truth is obvious, it’s always obvious, isn’t it? Screenplays sometimes hide the truth, which isn’t necessary. You have to give audiences some credit. You don’t have to play around the truth. And what Pop Whitehouse was saying, even though you might hate him for it, was the truth! He knew exactly who he was. He was, nevertheless, afflicted, but he was also very honest.

Tell us some more about working with Paul Schrader.

Schrader knows what he wants and knows when he’s got it. He’ll play to shades. “A little darker, Jim.” “Not so bright!” (laughs) It was a very good shoot, not difficult at all. And Paul certainly helped in that.

What was it like studying with Stella Adler?

Great. I actually studied with Jeff Corey out here first. His philosophy was more improvisational. Get away from your ego, get away from lines, things like that. Learn how to play the action of the scene, that’s what improv is really about. Stella, on the other hand, was into style. The style of Shakespeare, modern styles. She’d show you how to do it. You’d see her transform into a raving hag and then into a little girl. Drop of a hat, bang. That’s what I mean about acting. You don’t have to live it. As long as the character doesn’t inhabit you, that’s the kick of acting. De Niro studied with Stella. She was furious with him for putting all that weight for Raging Bull. (laughs)(imitating Stella) “What are you doing to yourself?! You’ll ruin your health!” (laughs). She was very demanding, very hard on women especially. She would just strip you down, peel your ego right off your skin.

Who was in your class at Stella’s?

Warren Beatty was in my class. He played piano in this Irish drama we did called Red Roses for Me. I played an Irishman (in an Irish brogue) “Aye, what’s goin’ on over here?!” (laughs) There were a couple others, but Warren went on to the most prominence. From there, I went onto live TV. The first thing I ever did was with Sidney Lumet. That’s how I paid my rent, that and commercials. I once did a Remington Rand commercial where I shaved off eleven days of growth, live on-camera, in less than a minute! (laughs)

You did a couple Twilight Zones also. What was Rod Serling like?

Serling was very tight-lipped. He had a jaw that never completely opened up! (laugh) But I really loved him. He was a sweet guy. I was always running into him when he was going back to D.C. to “do something.” He was very active politically, always trying to “get things done.” That’s why all of his things had some sort of a political bent. Not just political, but sociological as well. They were all about something. You just don’t have that anymore. You have a couple of guys beating each other up, a little sex here and there, but it’s not about anything anymore. As good as NYPD Blue is, it’s about relationships, and nothing else. But Rod was great, he was just dynamite and that’s what killed him. He just used all of himself up. But now they don’t even need actors. They’ve got The Rugrats, they’ve got the pig (Babe), they’ve got cartoons. They’re slowly getting rid of the actor, which they’ve been trying to do for years. (laughs) “Why do we need actors?”

You and Steve McQueen were great friends. Tell us about Steve.

Steve always thought of himself as a re-actor, not an actor. I think he got that from John Wayne (laughs). What can I tell you about Steve? (His first wife) Neile used to call him a “male nymphomaniac.” (laughs) He had an incredibly dynamic personality. He was like a kid. He said to me one time “Why can’t they make a movie about just one guy–me!” (laughs) He even had a script idea about a guy who crashes in the desert, and trying to survive. While we were shooting Hell is for Heroes, we were shooting up in Redding, where it was so hot, I mean 110 in the shade. And the studio gave him this convertible. And we’d be driving along the road, and all of the sudden he’d shoot off the road and go tearing through the woods, as fast as he could until he ran into something! So he wore this car out in about a week and a half, and they sent a guy out who said “What the hell happened to this car?!” Steve said “I dunno. It just stopped running.” (laughs) He would always test the producer, Marty Ransohoff. When they were doing The Cincinnati Kid (1965), he ordered two dozen pairs of Levis on the studio! Marty said “What the hell do you mean?! You don’t wear any Levis in this picture!” Steve said “Yeah, but I wear them to and from the picture.” (laughs) He hated to go out in public. He hated to sign autographs. He hated people to come up and bother him. So he’d put on disguises to go out.

It sounds like you guys were polar opposites.

We were, except that we both were fascinated with cars. We hung out together quite a bit, would drive cars, smoke grass, have a great time. He was a unique character, all those guys were. Steve. Peckinpah.

L to R: Sam Peckinpah, James Coburn, Kris Kristofferson on the Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid set.

Tell us about Sam Peckinpah.

Sam Peckinpah was a genius for four hours a day. The rest of that time he was drunk. He called himself “a working alcoholic,” but he was much more than that. I think the alcohol sort of quelled all the influences that were going on around him so he could really focus on what he was doing with the film. He would shoot with three cameras and just… do it. You never talked with Sam about things like motivation. I asked him one time, when we were doing Major Dundee. I said “Sam, what is it that makes my character tick?” And he thought about it for a minute and finally said “Drier. Dry. He doesn’t give a shit.” And that’s who that character was! And that’s how I played him. It was really sad what happened to that picture. The studio took it away from him and re-cut it. We had a great knife fight in that picture, between Mario Adorf and myself. And it was a viscous fucking knife fight. While we were shooting it, people were yelling for us to stop! That’s how real it looked. It was a terrific piece of action, and it was cut from the film the night it premiered at the Paramount theater, Sam saw the studio’s cut and was just devastated. His hands were shaking. He had half a pint of whiskey and dropped it. It smashed on the floor. And my wife at the time said “Sam, it’s okay, it’s only a movie.”

When you look at Major Dundee, it’s sort of like looking at the U.S. cut of Pat Garrett, which was also severely compromised by the studio. You can see there’s a masterpiece in there somewhere.

I agree, but what they call the “director’s cut” of Pat Garrett is actually just the television cut. Sam had the only true cut that he made, and that’s up in his archives in Sonoma. When he finished cutting Pat Garrett, it was taken away from him. This was Jim Aubrey at MGM and he was more interested in getting his hotel ready than he was in film. I think he really despised anybody who displayed artistry. He really like digging into them. When we started shooting Pat Garrett, I just finished shooting a film with Blake Edwards called The Carey Treatment (1973) that Aubrey also took away and re-cut. And I said to Sam “This guy’s crazy! He could do this film all sorts of harm.” Sam said “Don’t worry about a thing, Jim. I just bought one share of stock in MGM, and if they mess with me, goddammit, I’ll sue their asses!” (laughs) “One share of stock, Sam?! What’s that gonna do ?!” “You’ll see.” (laughs)

I heard a story that Peckinpah got drunk during the shoot and didn’t want to kill Billy. True?

Yeah, but he wasn’t that drunk. We were sitting in his trailer and he said “Goddammit! Why do we have to kill him?” “Well Sam, that’s the way it happened.” “Well, why can’t we make it un-happen?” “Sam we can’t do it.” (beat) “Why… not?!” (laughs) I think he saw a lot of himself in the character of Billy. We found out halfway through the shoot that most of the masters we had shot were out of focus. We were using five or six cameras at once and we didn’t have a camera mechanic because MGM wouldn’t pay for one! So we used different lenses, different set-ups, and still, it’s all out of focus. Finally the camera mechanic is sent out. It turns out the flange in the camera was off by one one thousandth of an inch, or some damn thing. So we tell Aubrey that we have to re-shoot all these masters. He says “You’re not gonna re-shoot anything. The audience isn’t gonna know the fuckin’ difference!” Can you imagine?! It was just mind-blowing! So what we did was, we stole all those shots when the brass didn’t know we were shooting and got it all! So now this really pissed them off, because now we had some real film on our hands! (laughs) So Sam had his cut previewed, and at the same time, Aubrey had his guys cutting their film. So all the editors got together and gave Sam a cut of his film, but without a soundtrack. He didn’t get that back until he cut it for television. But there’s only about five minutes missing from that cut he originally made.

L to R: Kris Kristofferson, R.G. Armstrong, and Coburn.

I thought R.G. Armstrong was really amazing in that film.

R.G. Armstrong saved my life. I had rheumatoid arthritis really badly and every day for ten months he’d come over and give me a deep tissue massage. I couldn’t stand up without breaking a sweat. This was about 1978-79. I didn’t come out of it completely until the last couple years. Doctors don’t really know anything about arthritis, other than to say “take these.” So I went on a long fast, fifteen days, then broke the fast. Took a blood test and found out I was allergic to 45 out 75 foods that I was tested for. Started eating right, but I was still contaminated, so R.G. came over and just broke down all that crystallization that had occurred. I was turning to stone, really, is what happened. I’m free of pain now because of this drug I’m taking called MSM. It rejuvenates the tendons. It’s fantastic because I couldn’t move. And this was all right at the peak of my career. If you have a background of Irish or Scotch-Irish, you’re predisposed to having that arthritic gene. But you never know what triggers it. Mine was triggered by negative emotion. I was going through a divorce and I wasn’t going to “let it affect me.” So I was just turning to stone on the inside instead. It’s a terrible disease. The immune system takes calcium out of the bones, and puts it into the muscles. And then the ligaments shorten. That’s why you see a lot of arthritics who look shriveled.

Tell us about the genesis of The President’s Analyst.

Ted Flicker and I met while we were shooting Charade in Paris. He’d come over to meet with his friend Peter Stone, who’d written the picture. So Ted was sitting in the background with his big black shades, watching us shoot. So Peter introduced us. George Peppard and Elizabeth Ashley were having a Christmas party a few years later. Ted was there. He said “I’ve just finished a script called The President’s Analyst.” I said “That’s an intriguing title. Do you have a deal on it?” He said “No.” So I took it home, read it, and wanted to do it. Ted said he wanted to direct it, so I said “Let me talk to Paramount.” I had just done Waterhole No. 3 (1967) over there. Robert Evans had just taken over, he loved it. Peter Bart read it, loved it. They said “Can he direct?” I said “I dunno, let’s find out.” So they put the whole deal together in five days! It was Evans’ first film at Paramount. There are some great scenes in there. It was named one of the finest political films of the decade by the Sunday Times in London. Ted Flicker never did another movie. He moved out to New Mexico, did one hit TV show, the name of which escapes me, and sculpts, paints. Just finished a script about the Civil War.

L to R: Mike Stone, James Coburn, Chuck Norris, Bruce Lee, 1960s.

I know you were also very close to Bruce Lee. Tell us about Bruce.

Bruce was a true martial artist, created himself, from a little roustabout guy running around the streets of Hong Kong, into this magnificent fighting machine. He truly was an artist. His art had no defensive movements. It was all attack. He was so fast, you couldn’t touch him. He was so fast, he had to slow down for the camera, because it couldn’t catch him! It would look like he hadn’t done anything. (laughs) We wrote a script together called The Silent Flute, with Sterling Silliphant. We all went to India. Everytime we went someplace, Bruce had this pad that he’d hold in one hand and punch with the other! It drove me nuts! (laughs) I said “Bruce, will you cut it out, man?! You’re shaking the whole airplane!” He said “But it make my knuckles hard!” “I know, but it’s pissing me off!” (laughs) Everything he did was related to his art. But he had a great sense of humor, or he did until he went to Hong Kong. He came back from Hong Kong one time, and he was always very outspoken about martial arts. “This martial arts in Hong Kong is bullshit,” he said, because there was no bodily contact. “Judo good. Ju-jitsu good. Aikido, best. But this other stuff, no good.” So we’d go to these tournaments and he’d spout off… he was back in Hong Kong, and was invited to this tournament that was televised, as an observer. He was famous, and controversial, as being an outspoken martial artists. So they were breaking boards and ice with their heads… Bruce said “That’s not martial arts.” So they said “Why don’t you show us your idea of martial arts.” So they taped up three thick pine boards. So he held it out and side kicked it, and everything went flying into the air, knocked one of the lightbulbs out way up. Sparks came flying down… it was one of those great, dynamic moments! And the next day, the papers were filled with this! From that, both Run Run Shaw and Raymond Chow, who were big film producers there, made him offers to do films there. So he came back and we were having dim sum at the Golden Door down in Chinatown, and he’s telling me all this. He said “They want me to do this TV series at Warner Brothers called Kung-Fu. But I’m also getting these offers in Hong Kong. What should I do?” So I thought about it for a minute, because he really wasn’t a good actor. But he had great dynamic presence and had this macho attitude that he could play really well… but that would be very tiresome watching for an hour on television. Plus he spoke with a very heavy Chinese accent. So I said “Go back to Hong Kong and make southeast Asian movies. You’ll be huge star.” “But I want to work here.” I said “You want to be a movie star, right? It’s what you’ve always wanted.” He thought for a minute and said “I want to make more money than Steve McQueen.” (laughs) So he went to southeast Asia, David Carradine did Kung-Fu in slow motion, Bruce became a huge movie star and made more money than Steve McQueen. Strange story… Anyway, then I get a call one morning from Sterling Silliphant saying “Bruce is dead.” I didn’t believe him, but I learned that a couple months before he’d come home and passed out in between really these really intense workouts that he was doing. And this girl that he was with couldn’t wake him up. He went to all of these doctors who told him “Your body’s perfect, you’re just over-worked.” He went back and within six weeks he was dead of an edema of the brain. And that was that.

What do you think of the state of most Hollywood films today?

I’m from the Billy Wilder school. Somebody asked him “Do you ever go to movies?” He said “No.” They said “Why not?” Wilder said (German accent)”Build da set, blow it up! Boom!” (laughs) Finally, they’ve gotten rid of the actors.

Still, there’s films like Affliction, only they’re all indie films, as opposed to studio pictures.

Right, they’re all about something. You have to go the indie route. The English Patient was about something, and it was an indie. But look how long it took that to get made. But when it was, all the actors went for it. And we do, we do go for that. And Billy Wilder, one of the greatest directors in history, can’t get a fuckin’ job! He can’t get hired.

I know a producer who wanted Wilder for a film at Tri-Star a few years ago, and the exec at Tri-Star said “Billy Wider…?” Isn’t he, like, 70?”

(laughs) Yeah, but he’s got 70 years of talent in him, too! I don’t know where these guys come from. They come out of business school, not film school… All the studio heads when I started out were filmmakers, they knew and understood the craft. They weren’t owned by corporations. Zanuck was always a filmmaker. Jack Warner was at Warners when I started. Cohn was at Columbia. All their movies were about something. It wasn’t about making money so much, as about making entertainment that would make money. Now it’s about build the set, blow it up! Give somebody a giant gun and let it go boom-boom-boom… but it’s really in the hands of the people. If it goes into the hands of the mechanics, it’s going to go down the tubes. But I think there’s enough interest in some of the young filmmakers and actors in doing quality work. There’s some wonderful actors out there: Johnny Depp, Robert Downey Jr., Helen Hunt, Ed Norton… I think real filmgoers are interested in something more intelligent and challenging… but where is it going? Well, if I could say where it was going, I’d invest in it! (laughs)

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Great Conversations: Demian Bichir

I sat down with actor Demian Bichir during the final months of 2008, when he was appearing in “The Waters of Babylon” at the Geffen Playhouse. Since then, Bichir has become a recognizable face north of the U.S.-Mexico border following his lauded turn in 2011’s indie hit “A Better Life,” for which he was tapped with a Best Actor Oscar nomination.

DEMIAN BICHIR DRINKS FROM THE WATERS OF BABYLON, FIGHTS A REVOLUTION WITH CHE AND TAKES A WALK IN THE WEEDS

A native of Mexico City, actor Demian Bichir is currently batting a triple with two high-profile supporting roles on the big and small screen, as well as the male lead (co-starring with Shannon Cochran) in Robert Schenkkan’s play By the Waters of Babylon, which is currently onstage at The Geffen Playhouse. Prior to trotting the boards in Westwood, Demian wrapped Steven Soderbergh’s back-to-back films on Cuban Revolution icon Ernesto “Che” Guevara: Guerilla and The Argentine (later retitled to the simpler Che), playing the pivotal role of Fidel Castro, and debuted on the Showtime hit series Weeds, playing the wily and charismatic Mayor of Tijuana, Mexico: the new love interest to series star Mary-Louise Parker.

The second of three sons born to renowned theater director Alejandro Bichir and actress Mariacruz Najera, Demian and his brothers Odiseo and Bruno are three of Mexico’s most renowned performers, so much so, in fact, that one year at Mexico’s MTV Movie Awards, there was a special category called “Best Bichir in a Movie,” which Demian won. A veteran of stage, screen and television in Latin America, Demian Bichir’s star has arrived on American shores with a vengeance. He sat down recently at The Geffen to reflect on his life as a performer.

Let’s start out with Che. You spent five months working on it.

Demian Bichir: I was lucky enough to get the offer when I had enough time to work on it. I dove into the character, the process and research of it. Plus, growing up in Mexico, we are very close to the event of the Cuban Revolution, because it was planned in Mexico City. I already knew many, many things about it. I read Castro’s spoken-word autobiography, called One Hundred Hours with Fidel (U.S. title: Fidel Castro: My Life), which is a series of interviews he did with Ignacio Ramonet, who’s a famous journalist. I also got a lot of DVDs, many from Havana, where I was able to study footage of Fidel, which was very helpful.

Tell us about Fidel. What was your take on him?

Well, when I put myself on tape for the audition, I remember thinking that there were so many great characters involved in the Revolution; I knew I just had to play one of them. I didn’t have my heart set on playing Fidel, to be honest, and didn’t even really think of him. Then I got the call at five in the morning that Steven wanted me to play Fidel! I was like ‘What…?’ (laughs) I looked at myself in the mirror and thought ‘What the fuck is wrong with this guy? Me, as Fidel?!’ Then I started to see Fidel in my own face, and I thought ‘My God, Soderbergh is a genius, because he saw Fidel in me before I did!’ Then by the time I’d started working on it, and really getting into the character, people would stop and ask me for pictures! I was having breakfast at the Urth Café one morning, and this guy kept looking at me, and he asked “Do you mind if I take a picture with you? My grandfather is Cuban, and you look a lot like the young Fidel Castro.” There was another time where I was picking up my girlfriend at the airport, and there was an orange alert on, at the time. I had my beard fully-grown out by then, and they pulled me over and asked to look in my trunk. So I said ‘Sure,’ and got out and opened my trunk. And one of the cops said to me “What’s with the Fidel Castro look?” And I said ‘Well, I’m glad you asked.’ He said “Why is that?” And I said ‘Because I am Fidel.’ (laughs) And he gave me his “don’t fuck with me” face, and I said ‘Yeah, I’m doing the film with Steven Soderbergh, and Benicio Del Toro is playing Che…’ Then they were like “Really? Really? Hey Bobby, Richard, come over here! This guy is playing Fidel in the new movie!” (laughs)

Bichir as Fidel Castro in Steven Soderbergh’s Che.

You managed to get Fidel’s voice down, his mannerisms, and his Cuban accent. Was all that difficult?

Yes, that was all a big challenge, which is what drew me to the part to begin with. As soon as I don’t know what to do with a character, that’s when I say ‘yes’ to it. When on paper it’s really difficult, and I have questions, then I know it’s going to be a nice journey, a nice trip, especially if you’re with the right people.

How were Benicio and Soderbergh to work with?

They both are where they are in their careers because they’re great, just the absolute top in terms of their talent and commitment to their work. They’re both extremely clever and Steven actually held a boot camp for us prior to filming, which helped us all get into character: sleeping outdoors, living like the rebels did in the Sierra Maestra. Benicio is so funny, and such a real human being. So often you meet stars that you admire and they disappoint you, but with Benicio it was just the opposite. He got into character and pretty soon was commanding the whole boot camp.

Men in black: Demian Bichir (center) with brothers Odesio (L) and Bruno (R).

You come from a theatrical family in Mexico City.

My parents met when they were studying theater in a small town in northern Mexico called Torreon. They traveled to Mexico City without knowing anybody, and my father became a theater director and my mother an actress. Both my brothers are actors, as well. So it was in the blood from day one. (laughs) My parents had a theater company that would perform shows in every plaza in Mexico City. And we were always there, backstage, trying on the fake mustaches and driving everyone crazy! One day, the actors locked us up in a back room because we were such a nuisance. It was a real revelation for us when we figured out that our parents were making a living playing make-believe just like we did. Pretty soon, we all started doing professional theater when we were kids. When I got a little older, I wanted to play soccer professionally, and one night, my soccer coach came to see me in a play when I was about 14. And my coach was very impressed, apparently. At our next soccer practice, my coach took me aside and said “Listen, I had a great time last night. You were really amazing and fantastic. Do you know who Pele was?” And I said of course I knew who he was. My coach said “Do you know how he started playing soccer? He kicked coconuts around barefoot on the beach, because he didn’t have money for a soccer ball. He didn’t have any other choice, and you, you are a great actor.” (laughs) So that was a very nice way of telling me that my talents lay elsewhere than the soccer field! That was it: from then on I was an actor.

It’s interesting that you go from playing Castro to a victim of his regime in By the Waters of Babylon.

(laughs) Yeah, this play is really very poetic, in many ways. That’s why I love it. The characters are really well-written and (my character) Arturo has this duality and ambivalence that most Cubans feel and live with. There are so many Cubans in the world that have these amazing stories to be told, and Arturo’s is just one of them. I have many good friends who are writers that had to leave Cuba, and the story that Arturo tells is so heartbreaking and moving and special, and really hit close to home for me after hearing what so many of my friends went through, so that’s what really drew me to the character.

2015-07-13-1436770074-3302438-500x281
By the Waters of Babylon, with Shannon Cochran.

You and Shannon Cochran had to go to some very intimate emotional and physical places. I’ve always heard that love scenes are very difficult for actors.

Oh, absolutely, very difficult, especially if you don’t really know the other actor all that well. Most of the films I’ve done have involved some sort of nudity in the love scenes, but I’ve known most of those actresses prior to that time. It was much harder recently with Mary-Louise Parker in Weeds because the scene we did was filmed just a few days after we’d met. It was really intimidating for me because she’s such a great actor and so beautiful that…well, you don’t want to mess it up, you know? (laughs) So yes, it can be very tough, but that’s what they pay you for, is the hard stuff.

Bichir and Mary-Louise Parker in Weeds.

Your character in Weeds is very interesting because he’s morally ambiguous and quite pragmatic: he’s forced to tread in some dark areas in order to get good things done for his people.

Yes, and that’s what I find fascinating about him and the characters on that show: they’re very real. It’s all about the gray, because none of us are black and white. We can all be angels or demons, or both.

What category does your take on Castro fall into?

I think the big difference between a dictator and a leader is what you do or don’t do for your people. All of Fidel’s tasks and goals were always aimed at helping his people. That’s my perception, and when you think about Fidel’s actions and words, they were always aimed at helping his people. He knew that many things had to change in order to make things more equal. It made me think of our own revolution that we had in Mexico a hundred years ago, for the same reasons. It seems that now we need a revolution again in Mexico, because things have not been equal there for far too long.

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Great Conversations: Lauren Hutton

I interviewed model/actress Lauren Hutton in late 2007 at her home in Venice, CA. Hutton greeted me wearing a gingham workshirt, battered jeans and no make-up, hair pulled back. She was and is one of the most beautiful humans I’ve ever had the pleasure of laying eyes on. A sharp mind and tough core resided within, which I quickly found out as our conversation flowed and the hours passed. As she bid me good-night, she handed me a manila envelope. I opened it when I arrived home. Inside, the recent issue of Big Magazine that was done as a tribute to her remarkable career. That magazine, and her inscription, remains one of my most treasured mementos.

LAUREN HUTTON
NO NIP/TUCK REQUIRED

Lauren Hutton was the face of American fashion in the 1960s and ’70s. Having appeared on every major magazine cover multiple times (a record 27 times on the venerable Vogue), everyone in America knew the stunning beauty with the gap-toothed smile who seemed to represent every tomboy next door who blossomed into a swan when she went to her first prom.

Mary Laurence Hutton was born in Charleston, South Carolina November 17, 1943. Raised by her mother and stepfather (she never knew her natural father, who died in his mid-30s) in the Deep South, Mary was indeed a tomboy who explored the swamp behind her house with the regularity of a Mark Twain character. After attending Tulane University, she went to New York City, soon landing a job as a cocktail waitress at Manhattan’s legendary Playboy Club. Since there were already several Mary’s on the staff, Mary Laurence (her father’s surname) rechristened herself “Lauren,” both as a tribute to her dad, and inspired by Lauren Bacall. After being discovered by the legendary Eileen Ford, Lauren’s modeling career was launched, becoming (arguably) America’s first supermodel, which was cemented when she negotiated an exclusive cosmetics deal with Revlon in the 1970s, becoming America’s first fashion model to step into the formerly male-dominated entrepreneurial ring.

Lauren Hutton made her screen debut in 1968’s Paper Lion, co-starring with Alan Alda, following it with memorable turns in Karel Reisz’sThe Gambler, the Burt Reynolds hit Gator (1976), and the classic ’80s touchstone film American Gigolo, eventually appearing in more than 55 television programs and feature films. She hosted 150 episodes of her own talk show, Lauren Hutton and…between 1995-96, and launched her own successful cosmetics line, marketed over the internet, at LaurenHutton.com. She raised some eyebrows when, in 2005, at age 62, she appeared in a special issue of Big Magazine that offered up a career retrospective, topped off by a series of nudes shot by photographer Mario Sorrenti that still set men’s hearts aflutter world-wide.

Still an international icon of fitness, beauty and aging gracefully, Lauren Hutton returns to the small screen this month on FX’s hit Nip/Tuck, as Fiona McNeil, a Hollywood publicist that Machiavelli, himself would have been honored to have escorted to the royal ball. The radiant Ms. Hutton, a Venice local, sat down with us in her garden recently to discuss her remarkable life.

Your role in Nip/Tuck is a real hoot. I love how this new season is basically a satire on the show itself.

Lauren Hutton: Yeah, it’s been great fun. It’s all this guy Ryan Murphy, the show’s creator. I didn’t even have an agent. He went out and found me, because I really haven’t done any acting in ten years. I started this cosmetics business six years ago that’s taken up all of my time. Also, six years ago I nearly got killed on a motorcycle and was in hospitals recovering for about six months.

Were you in a coma?

It was a funny kind of coma, a subconscious coma, thanks to Dennis Hopper, who insisted I wear full leathers and to Jeremy Irons, who had just traded helmets with me, one with a visor on it, before the crash happened. Otherwise I’d have been in a real coma, blind, or more likely killed instantly. It was on a 100-mile ride celebrating the planned Guggenheim motorcycle exhibit. And it was me, Jeremy, Dennis, Laurence Fishburne, and a bunch of billionaire motorcycle enthusiasts. I was going too fast, hit some rocks, flew up 25 feet, jumped off and pushed (myself away from the bike) and headed back so that I wasn’t hitting pavement, I was hitting land. It was a mountainous part of Nevada called The Valley of Fire. Then I skidded across that red, rocky ground for 170 feet. But that visor saved by life, because those rocks probably would have torn out my eyes and maybe even part of my frontal lobe. So I’ll always be grateful to Jeremy Irons for insisting that I change helmets moments earlier!

Did that incident change your perspective?

It made me believe quite strongly in ancestor worship and angels. (laughs)

Did you see anything while you were in that state?

I was talking in my subconscious for about two and a half weeks, and all my friends knew it. Fourteen friends came to see me while I was in that state, and some stayed for weeks. Half of them had never been to Vegas, where I was hospitalized. A lot were artists and people who would never go to Vegas. But I was very moved to find that I had this really close family of friends.

You’re obviously very resilient. You’ve been open about the fact that your childhood was not pleasant: you never knew your father, who died very young, and your stepfather was apparently not a nice man.
I’m sure it’s all made me who I am, though. If you live through it, you get a very high-tensile burning point.

Your dad was a pilot?

Yeah, he did barnstorming-type things, tricks with planes, that sort of thing, and he was in WW II, but according to my mother, he busted out of officer training school up in Sacramento, while she was pregnant with me. He wanted to belong to the U.S. Army Air Corps because William Faulkner was his next door neighbor growing up, and his Scout leader, and was a big influence on dad. Faulkner wrote about my grandfather, who I also didn’t get to meet, whose name was C.L. Hutton, in a book called Intruder in the Dust.

How did your father pass away?

They said it was a heart attack, and he was either 34 or 36. But when they say “heart attack,” in the Deep South, you never really know. His father went down from a heart attack when he was around 45 or 46. I was twelve when dad died. As my granny said “Darling, it was one of the many war tragedies.” Divorce was a whole new idea, and my mother had divorced him, and her new husband didn’t want her to have had another man, so they changed my last name to my stepfather’s, which was Hall, even though he never formally adopted me.

And he wasn’t such a nice man, apparently?

No, not entirely true. He was a smart man, and a woods boy from Arkansas, Missouri, and Texas. He taught me how to catch a rattlesnake with my bare hands and fish, among other things. I was a delicate little southern girl afraid of the dark. He wanted my mother to himself, and me out of the house as much as possible, so he taught me things not to be afraid of, all of which were in my backyard, so I’d go out and explore it. Like I say, there were five things besides my stepfather that lived in our backyard in that swamp which could have killed me: four different kinds of poisonous snakes, 300 pound alligators. (laughs) I learned to be afraid of none of them.

But that was always such a strong part of your appeal: you were like the tomboy who evolved into this gorgeous, other-worldly beauty. And there’s not a man alive who doesn’t find that irresistible, much more so than a girly-girl.

Really? I never knew that. That’s good to know. I will say that growing up with hunter-gatherers was a rarified thing because that way of life really doesn’t exist anymore here. It still exists in Africa.

You became the world’s first “supermodel” in the ’60s, appearing on the cover of Vogue a record 27 times. How have you seen the business change since then?

It’s changed phenomenally, although I’ve only modeled a handful of times in recent years. It changed hugely with the Revlon contract I signed. During the ’70s I kept reading about athletes like Catfish Hunter getting a million dollars, and I yelled over to my old man, who was reading his Wall Strett Journal, ‘How can I get a contract like that?’ He said “Cosmetics companies. They’ve got tons of money. Refuse to do any make-up ads unless you’ve got a contract.” So I called Eileen Ford and she said “You do five or six cosmetics ads a year–more than anybody!” So I signed an exclusive contract with Revlon. Before that, a good model would make $ 300 a day, or $ 60 an hour. A serious working model would book six hours a day. And overnight, that was over, and the salaries for everyone jumped to $ 1500 a day, and then every generation, which in modeling is about five years, coned that number up, until we’re at the point where we are today. I did Revlon for ten years, then did American Gigolo, and really fell in love with acting.

You did some good movies prior to Gigolo, including one of the ’70s best films, The Gambler, which had a trifecta of talent: directed by Karel Reisz, written by James Toback, and starring James Caan, who was fresh off The Godfather.

It was the first time I was in Vegas, and we were there for months. I don’t remember any studio shooting, just shooting in Vegas. Most everybody, almost all men, would work all day, and gamble all night, or vice-versa, and I of course, didn’t gamble until the last day we were there. It was lonely, and extremely interesting. They didn’t keep the lights on all night in Vegas in those days, but they turned them on for us for an extra couple hours, where Jimmy and I had this emotional scene where I had to cry, and we only had an hour or so to do it, before they’d have to turn the lights off! No pressure, right? (laughs) Karel was an impeccable gentleman, and a great director, and the best director I’d worked with at that point, and just extraordinarily kind and careful. James Caan was just really funny. I’d never met anyone like him before. He was always taking off his shirt, showing off his lats, saying things like “Bet you’ve never seen anything like this back in…wherever.” It was funny because he’d grown up in Sunnyside, which was a very tough part of Queens, and I met his dad on the set one day. I think Jimmy may have been a little frightened of his dad! (laughs) He was in the meat packing business. They brought a chair out for his dad to sit down when he visited the set one day. He was probably in his 60s then. His dad was so big, and not from fat, that the chair just collapsed instantly! (laughs) But Jimmy was great, introduced me to all sorts of people, like Joe Di Maggio, who I never would have met, otherwise.

Not long after that you did Gator, which marked Burt Reynolds’ directing debut. What was that like?

Great fun. Burt is one of the best directors I’ve ever had, without question. One of the greatest things he ever did in that movie was, he tricked me. There was a part of the script, at the end, where I was supposed to laugh and cry simultaneously. I had no clue how I was going to do that. So you remember the big scene at the end where we’re in love, but we part ways, and he goes home and I go off to New York to become a big anchorwoman. So we kiss at my porch, and I’m crying and he walks out of frame. And as soon as he gets behind the camera, he goes into this Groucho Marx walk and grins back at me, and I just scream with laughter! So that was very clever. He’s a very good man. I haven’t seen him in a long time. A very good actor, and a spectacular director.

I have a cousin who’s in his late teens, and he asked me what the ’80s were like. I told him to watch American Gigolo.

Yeah, it was all about money and excess and Paul Schrader really captured that. Although my experience during that decade was a bit different. I spent a lot of the ’80s living in a loft in New York, and painting. I figured I was rich enough to do what I wanted and I painted almost full-time. I hung out with people like Julian Schnabel and Jean-Michel Basquiat. Andy Warhol used to cook on his roof for me. He was an exquisite cook, just unbelievable. So I had this amazing group of friends, and I watched their children being born and raised and it was very real and very bohemian, in many ways. But the other part of my life in the ’80s was making movie, after movie, after movie. I usually stayed in Beverly Hills when I was in town, and I had this other rich, sort of “limo” life that I lived. It was sort of a nice balance for me.

When you were making the film did you all know it was something special, or was it just another job?

No, everyone knew it was great, that it was ahead of its time. Paul had been trying to get it made for ten years. He’s a genius idea man, and a genius producer. He was one of the first people to use popular music the way he did in that film, with Blondie. Originally, John Travolta had the lead role. He was fresh off of Saturday Night Fever and Grease, which together had made a quarter of a billion dollars. There were entire rooms in Paramount stuffed with his fan mail. What happened was, two weeks before we were to start, John’s mother died. He was just a 24 year-old kid. He was in real agony, and we became very close friends. Then his dad had a heart attack. So John asked for a two week extension so he could pull himself together emotionally, and also lose some of the weight he’d put on during this time. And they wouldn’t give him an extension. Everyone was going to sue him. It was just a mess. So what John had to do to get out of it, was give Paramount a deal where they chose his movies, and he had no say. And prior to that, John had what no other actor in town had, which was final cut. Plus, John was very romantic. If John had played the role, it would have been much more romantic and you would have seen the gigolo kiss. With Richard, you never really see the gigolo kissing. You see everything leading up to it. You see his expertise in dressing, more than his expertise at romance.

But I liked the fact that the character of Julian Kaye was a bit removed and completely narcissistic. It was his narcissism that blinded him to the conspiracy around him.

All true, but you would have had a populist hit if there had been more romance in the film. As it was, it wasn’t a hit when it came out, but became a classic in retrospect on cable and home video. So we ended up being lucky, because Richard is such a wonderful actor, and he became a star because of that role, deservedly. We stayed great friends. He’s a very grounded, very spiritual guy. His wife, Carey Lowell, is a terrific gal, too. Richard was the only person who ever took my advice, and traveled. He went off and saw the world. It’s harder for stars to do it now, but back in the 60s, 70s, and 80s before the proliferation of media, you could be famous in the U.S. and travel abroad and still be anonymous. Anonymity is important if you want to feel human.

In the mid-80s you had a tough blow when your long-time companion Bob Williamson was discovered to have gone through nearly $ 13 million of your money.

Bob was my everything. I am who I am as much because of Bob as because of my genetics. He also enabled me. We were together 27 years. So much of it was amazing and magical, but I also allowed myself to be infantilized by him, and that incident forced me to quit being an infant, and to grow up. I think he had what they now call Asperger’s Syndrome, which is a mild form of autism that seems to affect highly-functioning people. He was absolutely brilliant. But I learned that when it comes to money, no matter how much you love someone, trust someone, keep at least half of everything you make, and invest it.

Is this part of the reason you started the cosmetics line?

When I did Gigolo I was nearly 40. And in the modeling world if you’re over 30, you’re nearly invisible. Being over 30 as an actor isn’t much better, and I just wasn’t getting the sort of parts I wanted to play anymore, with a couple exceptions, like Once Bitten, which was the first starring role for Jim Carrey. So even acting wasn’t that fun anymore for me anymore. I told my agent not to send me any script for a movie that I wouldn’t go see. Then (photographer) Steven Meisel asked for me for a shoot he was doing. He took the shots, and I looked horrible. It wasn’t his fault. He’s one of the best photographers in the world. It was the make-up. Make-up was designed for girls, not for women of a certain age. When you tried to apply it to women of a certain age as if they were girls, they look like freakish tarts, which I did. When you age, your skin loses collagen and water, making it dryer and more transparent. Plus I had put on nearly twenty pounds, after a lifetime of always being thin, no matter what I ate–great for filling out the wrinkles, though! (laughs) Plus, everything had moved. The shadows that I’d concealed with make-up when I was younger had shifted. Like when the skin at the bridge of your nose becomes thin, the cartilage underneath shows through, which makes your eyes look closer together.

And you spent years researching and traveling the world, looking for the right ingredients to make the compounds you were looking for, right?

Yeah, the whole process took about 13 years, from conception to when I launched. I like to call the line “idiot-proof” color-coordination, because it utilizes four basic skin tones: pink, yellow, olive and brown. And I say “idiot-proof” because this idiot could figure it out!

I know that you’re an active environmentalist, as well.

I heard Al Gore speak before he won the Nobel, at a party for Oceana. I’m a diver, and oceans are dying all over the world. Since I began traveling in the early ’60s, I’ve watched everything change globally from small to massively overdeveloped. We’ve become an animal run amuck. What we really need to look at is religions, and how they’re driving us to extinction. I think we’re in danger of becoming Easter Island, of just vanishing the way those people did, and leaving these huge totems behind for future generations to ponder. We’re at such a critical time and I think the human race is at a very fine line in terms of whether we’re going to make it or not. The apathy is what’s really scary.

All one has to do nowadays to get an idea of the “common man’s voice” is go onto any message board on the Internet, and they all sound like George W. Bush! Don’t you think that’s part of the reason he got elected: the world’s been taken over by C-students.

Yeah, C-student sound bytes, that’s what we’re bombarded with 24/7.

Doesn’t it seem to you that when you began traveling the world 40 years ago, we were a smarter country?

Sure. Two reasons: one, our world population has more than doubled. We were three billion in ’64, we became six billion in ’89, and they’ve been saying since’89 we’re six billion, although I recently read in The New York Times that we’re at six and a half. And meanwhile there’s been no die-off whatsoever, and second we continue to breed like crazy. I go to Africa every year, usually the east, and when you see what’s happening there, it’s like a microcosm of what’s in store for the rest of the planet if we don’t start taking notice. I go there to study tribes and animals, so it puts a lot in perspective.

What draws you to it?

I don’t know. It’s just been that way all my life. Maybe it started watching all those Tarzan serials when I was a kid. (laughs) One of the reasons I went to Africa was, when I was going to college, I was in school all day, and then I’d cocktail waitress all night. By the third year, I was tired! I also realized I was learning much more on Bourbon Street than I was in school, and I wanted to be an artist, and I knew that in order to be an artist, I had to see the world. So I heard about these tramp steamers where you pay $ 165 for a ticket, and go to Africa. I didn’t know at that point that Tangiers was North Africa! (laughs) I very naively thought that I’d dock, catch a bus out to the bush and see lions and tigers and bears. But that’s where the love affair with the continent started, and it never ended.

If women ran things, would they be different?

That’s a good question. Women and men have very different brains, so yes, I think they would be different. Would they be better? That’s the question.

What’s the answer?

(Shrugs her shoulders, shows off her world-famous smile).

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.



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All Songs At 15: An Insider’s Guide To Great Moments In ASC History

For this week’s Throwback Thursday, Katie Presley and intern Julian Ring share their favorite old All Songs Considered memories.

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Read The Overwhelming, Tragic Story Of Makeunder’s ‘Great Headless Blank’ EP

Hamilton Ulmer, the leader of the Oakland band, shares a track-by-track analysis of Makeunder’s latest EP, which was inspired by a terrible year in the songwriter’s life.

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Donald Trump: The Great Race Baiter

DONALD TRUMP’S BEEN RACE-BAITING SINCE THE ‘80s

History is a hell of an indicator for future behavior.  Before Donald Trump spent his days arguing that Mexico was ‘sending people that have lots of problems’ to the United States and that they are ‘bringing drugs, they’re bringing crime, they’re rapists’, he was busy taking out full-page ads calling for the death penalty to be brought back to New York so five Black and Latino teenagers could be executed.

The year was 1989; the horrific incident would be known as ‘The Central Park Jogger Case’; and the five boys charged with the brutal rape and attack on a white female investment banker were termed the Central Park Five.  For those unfamiliar with the intricate relationship between the police, politicians and the press (especially the NYC press corp), this case is perhaps the perfect example of how the marginalized can be easily demonized, maligned and convicted first in a court of public opinion – and later in criminal court.  As for the one and only Donald Trump, he was right in the middle of it all, and had no problem pompously sharing his two cents then, just as he is now.

“BRING BACK THE DEATH PENALTY.
BRING BACK OUR POLICE!”

That was the headline of the full-page, 600 word ad that ran in four major papers – The New York Times, The NY Post, The NY Daily News and NY Newsday.  Trump reportedly paid $ 85,000 for the ads at the time, and while calling for the death penalty to be reinstated, he wrote that the five accused teenagers should “be forced to suffer and, when they kill, they should be executed for their crimes.”  It’s important to note that while the victim, Trisha Meili, was severely beaten and brutally raped, she thankfully survived.  But not only was Trump rushing to have teens (aged 14 to 16) executed, he helped sell the narrative that these kids were guilty without a doubt despite the many inconsistencies present.

When the five – Antron McCray, Kevin Richardson, Yusef Salaam, Kharey Wise and Raymond Santana Jr. – were arrested in 1989, they were held and interrogated for hours and hours by police without the presence of their parents or an attorney.  They eventually confessed according to police, but later recanted their confessions and have always maintained that they were coerced into making those statements.  Their confessions were inconsistent with one another, as well as inconsistent with the evidence but none of this seemed to matter to the sensationalist press corp and the powers-that-be.  As the media firestorm ensued, calling the boys a ‘roving gang’, a ‘wolfpack’, ‘park marauders’, and with front-page stories referring to their actions as ‘wilding’, Trump contributed to the lynch mob mentality with his ads.

In 1990, the five were convicted in two separate trials, and one of the boys, Kharey Wise, was tried as an adult (he was 16), and ended up serving 13 years in jail.  The other four served several years each.  In 2002, a convicted murderer and rapist, Matias Reyes, confessed to the horrific attack, and DNA evidence backed his confession (for a thorough accounting and analysis of this case, watch the documentary ‘The Central Park Five’ by Ken Burns and Sarah Burns).

The five were eventually exonerated, and they rightfully sued the City of New York.  The Bloomberg Administration fought against the suit, and it wasn’t until September of last year that a settlement of $ 41 million was finally reached with the five men who lost their childhoods and opportunities decades earlier.  The $ 41 million figure came out to roughly $ 1 million for each year served in prison (their combined time served).

Despite the fact that a man confessed to the crime (which DNA evidence backed), and despite the fact that the City settled with the five (which is in effect an admission of wrongdoing), Trump never once apologized for his rush to judgment, nor his concerted effort to portray Blacks and Latinos as vicious animals who raped and attacked innocent Whites, and deserved to be executed.  Instead, in true Donald Trump fashion, he was defiant following last year’s settlement and called it ‘the heist of the century”.

“The recipients must be laughing out loud at the stupidity of the City,” he wrote at the time.  “These young men do not exactly have the pasts of angels.”

If we were to look at Trump’s business dealings, his teenage antics, his failed marriages, his baggage and his dirty laundry, it’s safe to bet that he does not have the past of an angel.  Nobody does.  Only difference is, Trump had a chance to live his life and build his empire, while these five men lost their youth and continue to live with the stigma of that horrendous case all these years later.

As more and more corporations and businesses separate themselves from Trump because of his comments regarding Mexicans and immigrants, the Central Park Five and their families are likely thinking, it’s about time.

Filed under: Editorial, Uncategorized Tagged: Donald Trump
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The 'Goosebumps' Trailer Is Here And It Looks Fucking Great

The 'Goosebumps' Trailer Is Here And …
Sony released the trailer for ‘Goosebumps’ and by all accounts the scariest thing is how good it looks.
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Mozart: The Great Piano Concertos – Mozart Festival Orchestra, Alfred Scholz, Svetlana Stanceva & Leonard Hokanson

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Mozart: The Great Piano Concertos

Mozart Festival Orchestra, Alfred Scholz, Svetlana Stanceva & Leonard Hokanson

Genre: Classical

Price: $ 5.99

Release Date: February 22, 2011

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The Great Transcriptions – Leopold Stokowski


The Great Transcriptions
Leopold Stokowski

Release Date:
July 3, 2015
Total Songs:
24

Genre:
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Duets II: The Great Performances – Tony Bennett

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Duets II: The Great Performances

Tony Bennett

Genre: Concert Films

Price: $ 12.99

Release Date: March 6, 2012

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Great Conversations: Robert Evans

I interviewed legendary Hollywood producer Robert Evans in 2002 for Venice Magazine, in conjunction with the release of the documentary “The Kid Stays in the Picture,” adapted from his iconic autobiography and audiobook. Our chat took place at Woodland, Evans’ storied estate in Beverly Hills, in his equally famous screening room, which mysteriously burned down a couple years later. Evans was still physically frail, having recently survived a series of strokes, but his mind, his wit and his charm were sharp as ever, with near total recall for people, places and stories. Many, many stories. Here are a few of them.

ROBERT EVANS: THE KID IS ALRIGHT

It’s a widely-held belief that the years 1967-76 represent the “golden age” of American cinema. Just look at a few of these titles: Rosemary’s Baby, Medium Cool, Romeo and Juliet, True Grit, Catch-22, Love Story, The Godfather I & II, Don’t Look Now, Harold and Maude, Chinatown, Shampoo, Marathon Man, to name a few. These films, as well as others from the era, helped reshape our world, redefine us as people, and remain timeless touchstones to which millions born and unborn will return probably for as long as man continues to inhabit this crazy mess of a planet. If you were asked, “Who’s responsible for giving life to these masterpieces?” most would respond: “Uh, well, let’s see there’s Roman Polanski, Haskell Wexler, Franco Zeffirelli, Francis Ford Coppola…” Whoah. Slow down there, Shell Answer Man. You’re leaving one guy out. One guy who was responsible for giving all those titles life. One guy who refused to play by the rules. One guy who picked up the dice, had the prettiest dame in the room give them a lucky breath of air, and let them fly, outcome be damned. Hell, he knew it was gonna come up 7. His friends, both real and those who think they are, still call him “The Kid,” a moniker bestowed upon him by the legendary Darryl F. Zanuck. Civilians know him as Robert Evans.

Robert Evans was born Robert J. Shapera on June 29, 1930 in New York City, the second son of a dentist who had the first integrated practice in Harlem. The family later adopted the last name Evans as a tribute to their paternal grandmother, whose maiden name was Evan. Young Bobby Evans had a comfortable middle class upbringing, being bitten by the acting bug at an early age, finding work as a radio actor in his early adolescence, already blessed with a distinctive, adult-sounding voice. Forgoing college, Evans joined his older brother Charles in running the elder Evans’ highly-successful women’s clothing label Evan-Picone, making Robert Evans a millionaire before his 25th birthday.

While visiting the west coast to open Evan-Picone boutiques, Evans was discovered poolside at the Beverly Hills Hotel by Norma Shearer, a silent, and early talkie, screen star and widow of the legendary boy mogul Irving Thalberg. Thinking him perfect to portray her late husband in Fox’s Lon Chaney biopic Man of a Thousand Faces (1957), Evans suddenly found himself playing opposite his childhood idol James Cagney, and voted “Most Promising Newcomer” by Photoplay magazine. His next role, as bullfighter Pedro Romero in the screen adaptation of Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises (1957), earned Evans his ubiquitous nickname. So incensed were most of the cast and crew that this young upstart was cast in a pivotal role, a telegram was sent to studio head Darryl F. Zanuck demanding that Evans be replaced. It was signed by Hemingway, Ava Gardner, Tyrone Power and Eddie Albert. Furious, Zanuck flew down to Mexico. Arriving on the set the day a bullfighting scene was being shot, Evans displayed such panache in the sequence, Zanuck, all 5 foot 4 of him, stood up gripping a bullhorn, and intoned: “The kid stays in the picture, and anyone who doesn’t like it can quit!” At that moment, Evans realized it was Darryl Zanuck, as opposed to James Cagney, that he wanted to emulate. Thus a moniker, and a legend, was born.

A fair to middling actor by his own admission, Evans’ career as a thespian fizzled out as quickly as it started. Evans returned to “being in women’s pants,” as he likes to joke, running Evan-Picone with brother Charles, but he longed to try his hand at producing movies. In the mid-60’s, he saw his chance, optioning a novel by Roderick Thorpe called The Detective, attaching Frank Sinatra to play the lead. This led to a multi-picture development deal at 20th Century Fox. Evans was getting ink again on the entertainment page, most notably, a piece in the New York Times by a young scribe named Peter Bart. The piece caught the eye of Gulf + Western chairman Charles Bluhdorn. Impressed by Evans’ moxie, Bluhdorn summoned “the kid” to Gulf + Western’s New York offices, offering Evans the position of head of European production for Paramount Pictures, one of G+W’s subsidiaries. Paramount, which at that time was “ranked 9th out of 8 studios in town,” was in dire straits, most of its investors pressuring the board to sell the lot for a tidy sum to the Jewish cemetery that bordered it. Bluhdorn refused to let this happen, quickly recognizing Evans’ solid-gold instincts, and promoting him to head of production back in LA. Evans just as quickly hired Bart to be his right hand man. This was 1966. By 1972, Evans had taken Paramount from the basement to the penthouse: the top studio in town.

Among Evans’ legendary accomplishments during his tenure at Paramount was during the production of Marathon Man, Evans was set upon getting Laurence Olivier to play the role of villainous Nazi war criminal Christian Szell. However, because Olivier at the time was riddled with cancer, he wasn’t insurable, so Paramount refused to use him. In desperation, Evans called his friends Merle Oberon and David Niven to arrange a meeting with the House of Lords (the upper body of the British parliament). There, he urged them to put pressure on Lloyd’s of London to insure Britain’s greatest living actor. The ploy succeeded and a frail Olivier started working on the film. In the end, not only did he net an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actor, but his cancer also went into remission. Olivier lived on for another 13 years and never stopped working.

Evans’ other legacy has been his propensity for surrounding himself with the world’s most glamorous and desired women, a list of names that would make Hugh Hefner green with envy. His male friends included Hollywood stalwarts Jack Nicholson and Warren Beatty, statesmen like Henry Kissinger, and behind-the-scenes powerbrokers, like the legendary and secretive Sidney Korshak. Married and divorced five times (his exes including Ali MacGraw, and former Miss America Phyllis George), Evans personified the glamorous movie mogul of the 70’s: blessed with the looks and wardrobe of a male model, architect of some of the most groundbreaking movies in history, his Beverly Hills estate, Woodland, the site of glamorous parties, precedent-setting business deals, and storybook romances. By the end of the decade, Robert Evans was approaching the sort of Hollywood omnipotence that people like Steven Spielberg and George Lucas achieved a decade later.

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In 1980, however, everything came crashing down. Implicated in a high-profile cocaine bust (even though he was 3,000 miles away when it occurred), Evans name was tarnished almost beyond repair, in spite of never being formally charged with any crime. In addition to a worsening cocaine problem, Evans’ biggest professional debacle was the ill-fated film The Cotton Club (1984) a labor of love for Evans, which turned into a literal nightmare. To add insult to injury, the murder of Roy Radin, an acquaintance Evans met as a potential investor in the film, was dubbed “The Cotton Club Murder Case” by the press, further tarnishing his once-spotless image. By the end of the decade, Evans was virtually destitute, a pariah in the town he loved, and the business that he helped shape.

Deciding to pull himself up by the bootstraps in 1990, Evans embarked on what would be his comeback project. The Kid Stays in the Picture was Evans’ life story, a Hollywood memoir that not only became an international best-seller, but also became required reading for a new generation of filmmakers and studio execs. The audio version of the warts-and-all tale became even more legendary, with Evans himself reading from the book, and acting out his life. Soon the phone started ringing again. Old pal Stanley Jaffe, now head of production at Paramount, offered Evans a place back at his old home, setting up a production deal. “The Kid” was back in the picture…with another hurdle around the corner.

In 1997, while hosting a party for filmmaker Wes Craven at Woodland, Evans rose to toast his guest, then dropped to the floor, the victim of a massive stroke. Once hospitalized, two more strokes followed, paralyzing the right side of Evans’ body. Doctors told him he would be wheelchair-bound for the rest of his life, if he were lucky. Determined to prove them wrong, Evans spent the next two years undergoing painful physical and speech therapy, rebuilding himself and his life.

Meanwhile, the book and audio of The Kid Stays in the Picture just kept growing in popularity. Approached by old pal Graydon Carter, Editor of Vanity Fair, Carter suggested turning Kid into a film, a self-narrated documentary about Evans’ surreal, rollercoaster of a life. The result: Nanette Burnstein and Brett Morgen’s documentary The Kid Stays in the Picture. A huge hit at this year’s Sundance Film Festival, Kid the movie is a fascinating, sad, hilarious, thrilling self-portrait of a man who refuses to be anyone but himself. The Focus Films release is currently playing in LA and New York, with a wider release planned for late Summer and early Fall. As Evans himself said, “I got to have a third act, and it’s been the greatest of my life.”

Robert Evans sat down with Venice recently in the screening room at Woodland, a place where more Hollywood history has been made than all the boardrooms at Paramount, telling the tale of how he has managed to stay Hollywood’s version of the mythical bird the Phoenix, rising up from the ashes that surround him, to be reborn.

What precipitated your writing the book “The Kid Stays In the Picture”?

Robert Evans: I wrote this book not knowing if it would be published or not. I could have cared less. I didn’t care if anyone even read it, just one person: my son, Josh. From the time Josh was seven years old until he was 17, his old man went from royalty to infamy. And kids can be very cruel. Unfortunately, royalty fades and infamy stays. The day Josh graduated from high school, the headline on the front page of the L.A. Times read: “Robert Evans Involved in Murder.” There all the kids were, dressed in their caps and gowns. Bob Daly was there. Terry Semel was there. Both their kids were graduating as well. And in spite of everything I accomplished in my life, I felt so low. Josh came up to me, hugged and kissed me, and I was just crying. Afterwards we all went to lunch, just me, Josh, and his mom, Ali MacGraw. Then I went home by myself and just cried some more, thinking “Why should Josh have to go through all this shit because of me and my mistakes?” So I wanted to write a book that would tell Josh who his old man really is. You can’t lie to a kid. You have to tell the truth. So I disappeared for four years while I wrote this book. And it wasn’t cathartic at all. It was painful to write about your fuck-ups, because then you’ve got to rewrite them and rewrite them and rewrite them. This book was the only legacy I could leave to him. I had no money. I lost my house. It was the most humble, purest endeavor of my life.

One could also argue that it’s been the most successful endeavor of your life.

Absolutely, more so than any film I ever produced. When I was finished with the book, every publisher wanted it, and it became an international bestseller. It also got me the best reviews of my life. Then when I did the audio version, it became a bestseller as well. One day (Vanity Fair Publisher) Graydon Carter came to me and said he wanted to make a film of it. I said ‘Graydon, you can’t make a film of an audio recording.’ (laughs) ‘I don’t want actors playing all these real people from my life. I don’t want George Hamilton playing me!’ (laughs) He said “We’ll figure a way of doing it.” Graydon spent two-and-a-half years getting releases from people who we never thought we’d get releases from: Jack Nicholson, Dustin Hoffman, Warren Beatty…out of 256 releases which we needed, we got 255! So it took two and a half years to make the picture. When I went to the screening at Sundance earlier this year, it was the first time I saw it all put together. It was a hallucinatory experience for me because it hurt. It hurt bad. When the picture was over, I got a 15 minutes standing ovation. I’d never had a two-minute standing ovation in my life. All this from a book I wrote for my kid. And the interesting thing is we’ve never discussed the book. We’ve never discussed the audio. We’ve never discussed the movie. He knows and I know and he’s the closest friend I have.

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Robert Evans and son Josh Evans.

There’s a very touching note you wrote to Josh that’s in the book.

Yeah. Would you like me to read it?

Sure.

(Reading from the book) “Hey Runt! Spent over three years writing this. It hurt. Hurt bad. Reliving your fuckups ain’t easy. Then writing ’em and rewriting ’em, that’s the killer. Did it for you. Yeah you, you little runt. You deserve it! I wouldn’t be today if it weren’t for you. I know it. You know it. Fuck it! I ain’t ashamed. Why keep it a secret? Knew the pain you were goin’ through, too. Showed all over your face. Them pimples you thought of squeezin’? That’s how many sleeping pills I thought of takin’. You pulled one hell of a hat trick, kid. That tightrope, you balanced it like a pro. Your strength stopped my fall. We’ve never talked about it, so I’m writin’ it. Set the record straight. Talkin’ disappears. That’s why it’s on paper. For better or worse, at least you’ll know who your ole man really is. How much he loves you. It’s all that matters. Pop.”

That’s a beautiful letter.

Well. I wanted to show him my life, warts and all. This is my legacy to him. And by doing that, it opened up doors that changed my entire life. It’s funny, not long ago I was completely washed up. Then to make matters worse, I had a stroke. I was half paralyzed. I had to learn how to walk again, talk again, hold a fork again. My right side was paralyzed, including half my tongue. But for some reason, the guy upstairs gave me a second pass. I heard the fat lady sing, literally. I heard Ella Fitzgerald singing It’s a Wonderful World. I saw the white light, then I passed out. When I woke up in the hospital, I thought I was in heaven at first. But when I really regained consciousness, I found myself more like Quasimodo than myself. I really felt like a freak. I took speech therapy for three years to learn how to use my tongue again. The real pain was the physical therapy, though. I used to be a pretty damn good tennis player, and I couldn’t even hold onto a ball. It was tough, but I did it because I wanted to prove them doctors wrong! I’ve never lived by the rules. I ain’t corporate. I’m not a good executive and I’m a lousy businessman, and I’ve never kept the hours that other studio heads did. I learned t his from Zanuck: when he ran 20th Century Fox, he showed up to the studio at 2 o’clock and left at midnight. So when I ran Paramount, I never had breakfast meetings. I can’t help it. I’m just not good in the morning. I’d show up at 11:30 and work until midnight. Everyone resented it, the idea being that you have to show up at 9. I’m not a 9-to-5 guy.

You always did most of your business from home, right?

More Hollywood history was made in my screening room during the late 60’s and 70’s than anywhere else. Chinatown was born here.The Godfather was born here. Francis Coppola and I practically fought WW III here during that time. Dustin Hoffman and Larry Olivier both lived here during Marathon Man. Olivier lived here for six months. Larry Olivier couldn’t get a job at the time, because he had cancer and no one would insure him. He was destitute. He couldn’t afford to send his son to college. Through my good friends David Niven and Merle Oberon, I was able to go before the House of Lords, and persuade them to get insurance for the greatest actor of our time through Lloyd’s of London. Olivier threw his arms around when it was over and said “You saved my life, old boy.” Not long after that, his cancer went into remission and he was able to live his last 13 years doing some of the most brilliant work of his career. That’s one of the proudest moments my life. It’s funny, I’ve led a very blessed and a very cursed life.

I think you’ve had more extreme ups and downs than almost anyone in Hollywood history.

I’ve touched magic as much as anyone, and I’ve been scandalous as much as anyone. And the strange thing is, all my “scandals” were non-truths. I’ve done a lot of wrong things in my life, but the two things that really brought me infamy: the coke bust and the so-called “Cotton Club murder” of Roy Raydin, I had nothing to do with. How can I get busted for something when I’m 3000 miles away? My nose ain’t that long. (laughs) But, I get ink. If you live by the sword, you die by the sword. People made careers over my carcass. I’m afraid to walk past the Hustler store on Sunset, forget about going in it! Someone takes a picture, boom! There I am on the front page: “Bob Evans, porn fiend!” (laughs) That’s why I rarely leave my house anymore. I’d get in too much trouble! (laughs)

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Out on the town with Ava Gardner, circa mid-’50s.

Yeah, but you were fodder for the scandal sheets way before your tenure at Paramount.

Oh yeah, going back to when I was dating Ava Gardner and Lana Turner at the same time, in the mid ’50s. I was getting headlines before most of today’s studio executives were even born. I have clippings of me with Terry Moore while she was secretly dating Howard Hughes.

Not bad!

In my teens, I was being kept by four women. I always had a knack for getting myself in trouble! I guess you could say that I’ve been leading a high profile, sometimes notorious existence for a long time. That’s what Jack Nicholson said I should call my book: “Notorious”! (laughs)

With John Frankenheimer on the set of Black Sunday, 1976.

You’ve worked with many amazing directors in your career. In 1977, you produced Black Sunday, which was directed by John Frankenheimer, who recently passed. What are your memories of working with him?

John, to me, is one of the best directors I ever worked with. He’s very unappreciated, too, I think. John went through a very bad period of alcoholism, which made him more than a few enemies. But I loved working with him, thought he was a terrific guy. Black Sunday turned out to be a terrific picture, but one of the big disappointments of my life. When that picture came out, they thought it would do more business than Jaws, that’s how big they thought it would be. I turned down an offer of $ 6.6 million to buy my points in it. I owned 57% of the film. You know how much business it wound up doing? Nothing. It tanked, due to a lot of factors. First, Arab groups claimed we were anti-Arab because the villains in the piece were Arab terrorists. Jewish groups claimed we were anti-Semitic because we tried to explain why someone would join a movement like Black September. I wound up spending a fortune of my own money to hire private security to protect myself because I was receiving death threats. Then, a few months before the film came out, Universal released Two Minute Warning, a film about a sniper in the LA Coliseum during a football game. Even though Two Minute Warning got awful reviews and Black Sunday got raves, and the two films couldn’t have been more different, people associated the two and stayed away. You just never know.

In almost every show business biography and autobiography I’ve read, their subjects are portrayed having one amazing success after another, almost to the point of omnipotence, only to self-destruct just when things seem like they’re perfect. What causes that tendency, do you think?

Gambling. Most successful filmmakers and producers are gamblers at heart. I mean, literally. Darryl Zanuck had such a bad problem he had to borrow money from Howard Hughes. And let’s face it: what’s a bigger risk in life than making films? And when you gamble, you don’t always win. David O. Selznick died broke. I wanted to be Selznick, that’s why I did The Cotton Club, and wanted to own it. But I wasn’t as smart as he was.

You write so well, it’s surprising that you didn’t have a career as a writer at one time.

Well, I co-wrote more scripts than you can possibly imagine, although I never took credit for them and didn’t want to.

But you are working on a sequel to The Kid Stays in the Picture.

Yes, it’s called The Fat Lady Sang. I open it with my stroke, when I was hosting a party for Wes Craven. I’m about halfway through it now. It’s about my life post-Kid, post-stroke, told in flashbacks, also a lot of things from my earlier life that weren’t covered in Kid. It’s all about the third act of my life that I didn’t have before. I’ll tell you, I can’t believe I’m here talking with you now. I should be dead. The guy upstairs is keeping me here a little longer to do something else. I’ve also got a new picture in production, called How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days, starring Kate Hudson and Matthew McConaughey. It’s shooting in New York and Toronto.

You seem to be completely recovered from the stroke. If I didn’t know what had happened, I’d never have guessed.

I had three, actually. One here and two in the hospital. I’m about 90% recovered, I’d say. The three most important things in my life before the stroke were the three S’s: sun, sex and sports. I can’t take the sun anymore because of all the pills I’ve got to take. I used to be a good tennis player. Now I’m in the paraplegic league, but I can play. Sex wise, let’s just say I’m not as dexterous as I was before, but I’ve got my libido at least. Sex will always be important to me. It always has been. That’s why none of my marriages lasted. (laughs)

I think any man who was in your position would have had a hard time being monogamous.

I haven’t been since I was 17. That’s why Frank Sinatra wanted to meet me so badly, when he saw me with Lana and Ava at the same time! He was very curious, to say the least. I actually didn’t dig Lana that much because she was a terrible alcoholic, in public places, too. She was a very unhappy lady, as was Ava. Terrible alcoholic. Very unhappy with her life. In fact, most actresses I’ve known are very unhappy with their lives.

Let’s talk about your days at Paramount. You came there at such a unique time. You even convinced the board to give you complete autonomy in running the studio.

Yeah, but that didn’t happen right away. I thought I was about to be fired. So I had Mike Nichols shoot this 40 minute film for me, which I presented to the unsmiling, 18 member board of Gulf and Western (Paramount’s then-owner) in New York, convincing them at Paramount would be the No. 1 studio in town after the release of Love Story and The Godfather. I signed resignation papers when I arrived in the office, saying they could keep the $ 300,000 it would cost them to buy out the rest of my contract if they’d just watch this 40 minute film. They agreed. After I screened it, Charlie Bluhdorn, my boss, called me into his office and told me to go back to work. I said “But Charlie, I resigned.” He said “Whaddya want, more money?” I said “I don’t want another dime from you. What I want is to be in a position were not a single one of those 18 motherfuckers can come on my lot, interfere with my films, or bother me in any way. I want complete control.” He says “Evans, are you crazy? I can’t do that? It’s against all corporate rules.” I said “OK, I’m going. Goodbye.” He said “Get back here!” So Charlie goes back in before the board. After an hour, he comes back. “Okay Evans, you got what you want. It’s your shop. You better have a lotta mazel, Evans! Now get to work!” So that’s how I got my autonomy. I wasn’t a fence straddler. I gambled with my 300 Gs and that’s what took Paramount to 140 nominations and that’s what made history. What do you think most studios would have said to me if I went to them and said “I want to make the story of 18-year-old boy who falls in love with an 80-year-old woman, to be directed by an acid head (Hal Ashby) and written by a guy who cleans swimming pools (Colin Higgins)”? They’d throw it out the window! (laughs) And that’s how we touched magic.

That’s one of my favorite films, Harold and Maude.

I show it every Valentine’s Day! It’s such a romantic film.

Tell us about Hal Ashby.

I loved Hal. A sweet, sweet man, and a great director. He died way too early. He was a brilliant film editor and had a good reputation for that, but his first picture (The Landlord) hadn’t even come out yet when we were prepping Harold and Maude. Colin Higgins worked for (producer) Eddie Lewis as a pool boy! I think it’s a classic that’ll last forever. Every film that the so-called “suits” didn’t want to make were all hits, and the pictures that they did want to make were all flops. No one wanted to make The Godfather. With Chinatown, they begged me “It’s Chinese, nobody’ll understand it!” They didn’t want to release it. They didn’t understand it. Then after it came out, after all the accolades, suddenly they understood it.

You mentioned how much the studio world has changed since you began in the mid-60s. Could Bob Evans happen today, or was it great timing: the right man for the job at the right time?

It could happen. I’ve always been fortunate enough to meet people who have been mentors me. Some people didn’t. Some people did. Fortunately, most people who did were at the top. I think it could be done again. Joe Roth has done it, very successfully. I didn’t much earlier age, though. I’m a huge gambler. My attitude always was if I get fired, I get fired. Big deal. So I took chances. I did things people said couldn’t be done. If someone came into my office and said “I’ve got a great idea for this picture. It’ll be so commercial and everyone will love it!” I’d say “Get outta here!” But if someone came in my office and said “I’ve got a really weird story to tell you. It may not work, but I think it’s really terrific and I’m in love with it.” That’s what happened with a film called Don’t Look Now (Nicolas Roeg, 1973). Nic Roeg went to everyone in town. No one wanted to make it. I did. Now it’s regarded as a classic. If you pick one hit out of three, you doing great. If a ballplayer bats one in three, he’s a star. If you hit a homer or two, you’re a big star. I always went by the percentages. With Roman Polanski, everybody told me I was crazy to hire this weird Polack to direct this high-profile movie (Rosemary’s Baby). I said “That’s why I’m doing it: it’s crazy!” You’ve got to risk to do something different, something original. If you don’t do what’s original, all you care about is keeping your job. Rules were made to be broken. Break them!

That’s one thing about this new generation of directors that’ve been pulled from commercials and music videos: they’re not in the filmmaking business, they’re in the advertising business and at the end of the day: they turn in these $ 150 million mouthwash ads.

Exactly. Everything is MTV-ized. There’s no scenes. There’s no texture. It’s cut, cut, cut! No one has the patience to sit and listen. You gotta have boom, boom, boom! Gotta have shoot ’em up! Gotta have a happy ending! Know what? I don’t believe in happy endings! I think they ruin things. I don’t believe in the boy getting the girl in the end. I believe in unrequited love. There’s nothing more mesmerizing than unrequited love. And real. Waterloo Bridge, Love Story, Chinatown.

Best last line of a movie ever, in Chinatown!

“Forget it Jake, it’s Chinatown.” Yeah, it’s a great one.

One thing that your book and the film really drive home is how mercurial relationships in Hollywood are. It would drive most people mad. How do you keep your sanity in that environment?

I’ll tell you how: I keep my circle very small: Jack Nicholson, Warren Beatty, Sumner Redstone, Peter Bart, a few others. When I was at my lowest, I didn’t lose my friendships.

Now you’ve become a hero and mentor to a new generation of young actors and filmmakers. Track record aside, I think it must be your candor that draws them to you.

People ask me “What’s the most important thing in your life.” I always answer “It has nothing to do with morality, it’s always telling the truth. Because then you never have to remember what you’ve said.” That way I can walk into any room at any time, and just tell it like it is. People may not like you for it, but there’s an asterisk to it: omission ain’t lying. (laughs)

Sidney Korshak, “The Godfather.”

The most fascinating character in your book was your late attorney and mentor Sidney Korshak.

I’m working with Billy Friedkin right now on the Korshak story. He was the ultimate power, my godfather. I spent every day with him for 40 years. A big bear of a guy, six foot five, former boxer. He was totally legitimate, never had a misdemeanor against him, but was the most powerful man I ever met. Seymour Hersh spent three years writing an article for The New York Times on Sidney and in three years, could find nothing out about him! Nothing!

And there was the secret of his power: anonymity. Prior to reading your book, I’d never heard of him.

Exactly.

Do you think your opposite profile, a very high one, is what made you such an easy target?

Yeah, absolutely.

Another lesson I learned in the book is to not be shy about approaching people, if you want to be in show biz.

And the bigger the person, the more approachable they are! I could reach George W. Bush easier on the phone than I could a junior agent at William Morris.

It sounds like The Cotton Club was the biggest professional disappointment of your life.

It was the worst single mistake I ever made in my life. I wanted it to be The Godfather with music. It took up six years of my life. I did more research on that than any picture I’ve ever done. Originally I was going to produce and direct it, and dedicate it to my late father, who had the first integrated dental practice in Harlem: “For you Pop, wherever you are. Your son, Bobby.” We even had a great poster drawn up for it. It read: “Its violence started the nation. Its music startled the world.” It was the single worst experience of my entire life. In 1979, when I began work on the project, I was worth $ 11 million. In 1989, I was worth $ 37.00. That was the 80’s for me. Not a fun time.

I’ve heard rumors that a longer version was going to be released.

It should be. Eleven musical numbers were cut out. I think it was done on purpose. All those guys that put the money up lost a fortune. I put my house up, too. But no, no, I doubt it. I think Francis had a score to settle with me after The Godfather. He was resentful, feeling I took too much credit for the film.

You’d think he’d be grateful to you.

No. No. (long pause) Francis is the most charming, seductive man I’ve ever met. I think he’s a direct descendent of Prince Machiavelli. Once you leave his kitchen, you’re enamored by him. (laughs) He’s so talented, so brilliant, and a dreamer. And I think rather self-destructive. We’ve only spoken once since that time, at the 25th anniversary screening of The Godfather. We all went down to the front of the theater afterwards, to tremendous applause. Francis started to pass me. Then he stopped, put his arms around me and whispered in my ear “We did something right.” That about sums it up.

How do you keep rising from the ashes like the Phoenix? What’s your secret?

Very simple: I wanna stay in the picture, because once you’re outta the picture, you’re out.

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‘The Great Wall’ Aims to Bridge Hollywood-China Divide


The fantasy epic features Matt Damon and Willem Dafoe alongside a host of major Chinese talent.

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The Great Escape

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Great Conversations: Steve Zahn

I interviewed character actor Steve Zahn, one of film’s most visible faces over the past twenty years, in 2009. He was memorably funny, energetic and self-effacing, much like the characters he tends to play.

STEVE ZAHN MOVES UP THE LADDER IN MANAGEMENT

Steve Zahn has become one of his generation of actors’ great chameleons. Zahn’s filmography features roles as diverse as goofball stoners, cocky musicians and one very brave fighter pilot struggling for survival in a North Vietnamese prison camp.

It all started November 13, 1967 in Marshall, Minnesota when Zahn was born to a Lutheran minister and his wife. After being bitten by the acting bug in his Minneapolis high school, Zahn spent one abortive semester at local Gustavus-Adolphus College (“I’d already paid for a semester, so I thought, ‘Okay, I’m gonna stay, and eat at the caf’ and lift weights.’ I was stupid”), before crashing the audition of a professional production of Biloxi Blues at the urging of his acting coach. Zahn, a non-pro at the time, was cast in the lead, and as the famous blues song goes, “the train kept-a-rollin'” from there, including graduation from Harvard’s prestigious American Repertory Theater program several years later. After honing his craft on stage in New York, Zahn landed his first film role in Ben Stiller’s Reality Bites, in 1994, and garnered major attention for his turn as the manic guitarist Lenny Haise in Tom Hanks’ writing/directing debut, That Thing You Do! in 1996.

Zahn’s latest turn is in the indie gem Management, playing Mike, a sweet-natured slacker in the small Arizona town of Kingman, who falls hard for an overnight guest named Sue (Jennifer Aniston), at his parents’ motel where he is employed. Reminiscent of some of the 1970s’ best oddball romantic comedies like Harold and Maude, Management is a delightful cinematic road trip that charts the unlikeliest of romances, and how what doesn’t seem to make sense in affairs of the heart is oftentimes a sign that you’ve met your soul mate. Boasting terrific support from Woody Harrelson, Fred Ward and Margo Martindale, the film also marks the directing debut of playwright (and screenwriter) Stephen Belber (Tape). The Samuel Goldwyn Films release goes into limited exhibition starting May 15, with wider distribution to follow over the next month.


Steve Zahn, who resides on a farm outside of Lexington, Kentucky with his family, spoke with The Hollywood Interview during a recent stopover in Los Angeles.

I really loved this movie. It was nice to see a film that wasn’t about things blowing up, for a change.

Steve Zahn: Thanks, man. I really love it, too. It’s so nice to be talking about something that’s so cool and so different. Aside from the fact that it’s great to do press for something you’re proud of, this film is a really terrific throwback in the genre of romantic comedy. It’s…it’s not even a throwback, it really stands on its own. It’s unique.

Yeah, but it also has a really cool, ’70s vibe.

Yeah, because romantic comedies in the ’70s had a lot of regular people playing the love interests, you know what I mean? You had guys like Dustin Hoffman…

Yeah, movies like Harold and Maude, which was about oddballs falling in love, which is what this is.

Yeah, and because they’re a bit odd, or even ordinary to some extent, it makes it easier to relate to them, than it is in a kind of formulaic romantic comedy, which can minimize the audience and you get what you pay for, but ultimately, it’s an experience that’s forgettable.

It’s like eating at McDonald’s.

It is, yeah. I’m not going to see movies like that because, well, I’m a guy! (laughs) But I mean, if I was a guy, I’d go see this movie. Wait a minute…I am a guy! (laughs)

The fact that it’s from the guy’s point-of-view also makes it unusual in the “rom com” genre.

Exactly, it’s from the guy’s point-of-view, and a guy that is not like an expert surfer, or whatever…

He’s not Matthew McConaughey.

Right. He’s a regular guy who works in a motel and his mom’s terminally ill. He’s trying to make the best of it, getting soup over at the Chinese restaurant and doing yoga…

I didn’t know they had yoga in Kingman. They’ve come a long way since I was there last.

(laughs) It’s so refreshing. When I read it I kept laughing so hard in my kitchen and my wife said “Wow, it’s that good?” And I said “Yeah, it’s really that good.” In the same breath I’d turn the page, and I’d be so floored and moved it and I realized ‘God, I have to be in this. How do I get in this?’ You know when you read something that great that a lot of other people are going to want to play the part and be in it, so I just immediately jumped on it.

L to R: Writer/director Stephen Belber, Jennifer Aniston, and Steve Zahn.

I saw that Jennifer was one of the producers. Was she the one that approached you with the project?

No, it was Wyck Godfrey, the other producer, and Steve Belber was also really instrumental in that. I knew Jennifer and I knew she was cool with it, but not until after. I just kind of went in blind, not caring who else was in it, as long as I was. (laughs) I sort of went in and did the meeting that they always advise you not to do: where you tell them how you’re perfect for the job. (laughs) I tried to be modest, but I just kept on saying ‘I get it, that’s all I can tell you. I get it.’ Steve writes for pauses. I get that. I understood the tempo. I understood the tone, that there was slapstick comedy and kitchen sink drama in the same movie. For some reason it all makes sense because these characters all so believable and so vulnerable and interesting and funny because of that.

Two of my favorite character actors play your parents: Fred Ward and Margo Martindale.

Those guys, both of them are…that was just a thrill, for real. Fred is the rock of Gibraltar. You won’t find a more old-school, manly guy. Those are my favorite scenes in the movie, those scenes with Fred.

He’s a real throwback to the Robert Mitchum/Lee Marvin school.

Yeah, totally. Nothing seems to really affect him, but then you see that still waters run deep. And Margo was terrific, but a lot of our scenes wound up getting cut. Steve had a really tough time losing those scenes. I don’t think he realized how well they would come off, and they wound up coming off much more deep and meaningful than he intended them to be. It kind of brought the movie into a different place, and a different tone, so they had to minimize that. Margo is so wonderful even in that little bit, that you get it. You get that relationship between she and her son. It’s like writing a symphony: you can’t just keep it at this ardaggio, you have to bring it up again.

Aniston and Zahn get mellow in Management.

It really seemed like you, Woody, and Jennifer were having a lot of fun.

We did, and it’s not always like that. I’ve had horrible times on movies, and they’re still great, because it’s a great job. But when you can’t wait to go to work the next day because you’re laughing your fuckin’ ass off, and you know what you’re doing is actually challenging and interesting, yet at the same time you know you’re doing it well, there’s nothing like it. And I had the best time with Jennifer. I don’t know what it was. We just work similarly, and she’s such a kind, great actress who comes totally prepared right out of the gate. We rehearsed for a week before we shot, which was essential, and Steve, coming from the theater, really wanted that. I was all for it, and was nervous about it. I was like ‘Let’s practice so when we get to the game I know what the fuckin’ play is, and I can catch the ball.’ I really approach things like that and Jennifer is the same way. By the first day of shooting, we felt really comfortable with each other. That scene where we fight in the basement, that really high-pitched, emotional scene, we rehearsed that two times before we shot it: we read it at the table and then we got it on its feet, and it just worked. I remember we did it and we were all like ‘Let’s just leave this one alone.’ We knew then that it was gonna be good.

Your character is a tricky one in that if he were miscast, or approached from a slightly different angle, he wouldn’t have worked at all, and maybe come off as a bit of a loser.

People have brought up the “stalker” thing, which I wasn’t worried about at all. Jennifer played it so well, and it’s really due to her reaction that the idea of him being a stalker isn’t present at all, I don’t think. But what I was worried about was him coming off as a kind of loser, like you say, this kind of sad sack.

You have to believe that Jennifer Aniston is going to fall for this guy, and the only way anyone would buy that is if you found your character’s humanity, which I think you did.

Yeah, and Sue has got her flaws, too. There are so many great scenes with her where Jennifer doesn’t say anything, like when she’s sitting in her room with her computer, and it’s just quiet. She just sits there, not knowing what to do, waiting for her time to leave, and she calls her mom…it was just so vulnerable and yet at the same time, she was able to put this wall up and be this hard woman that she didn’t want anybody to attach themselves to.

Mike (Steve Zahn)’s first clumsy attempt at seducing yuppie Sue (Jennifer Aniston).

Her issues had to do with intimacy, for the most part.

And yet at the same time, it was so cute, you know? (laughs) And that’s what Mike loves about her. And he even says in that great line “I think you’re really sweet.” And she’s like “Please…” And he’s like “No, I do. Underneath…” “Underneath what?” “Underneath the part of you that’s not.” And he’s fuckin’ telling the truth! And then he walks away, and that’s what brings her around to him. He’s very honest.

He was probably the first person to really see her in a long time.

Yeah, or ever, aside from her mom, or whatever. It’s a very interesting movie and the challenge is to get people into seats so they can see it. How do you market this movie?

Yeah, how do you compete with tentpole, “event” movies like Star Trek, and the like that populate most of the summer?

I don’t worry about that stuff, or the new Tom Hanks movie. Those are completely different movies. And this thing is going to go out and platform itself across the country. It won’t be this big opening. It’ll be in Lexington in probably like, two weeks, and people will be like (Kentucky accent) “I couldn’t find your movie. We all went out but we couldn’t find it and had to watch…some other thing.” (laughs)

Let’s talk about your background a bit. You were born and raised in Marshall, Minnesota.

I was born in Marshall and raised in Mankato. My dad was the chaplain at Mankato State University, and my mom worked in the bookstore. We lived just off-campus. Then we moved to the suburbs of Minneapolis, to New Hope, which is where I went to high school.

Then you went to Harvard for grad school.

Yeah, I went to Gustavus Adolphus College for undergrad, but dropped out. It’s a very strange story. I worked professionally in Minneapolis, but I’d already paid for a semester, so I thought, ‘Okay, I’m gonna stay, and eat at the caf’ and lift weights.’ (laughs) I was stupid. Then I moved home and started working professionally, and auditioned for different grad and training programs, after working with these really amazing professional actors in these plays. They were like “You gotta go train, man. Go East and learn,” which was the best advice I got, ever.

When did you know you were an actor?

I was in high school and I was the guy that always got cast in the school play. Theater is huge in high school in Minnesota and I knew that I was very good at that, and gifted and I was “the guy,” but it still wasn’t something I ever thought of as “a job,” or something that one could do professionally. I was going to be a Marine before I was going to be an actor. I was really serious about joining the Marine Corps. Still all I read about is military history, and all that stuff. It’s not till I got to college and also I went to London for a trip and saw theater there, and realized that this was what I wanted to do.

Was there one epiphanous moment during a particular play that did it for you?

It was all of them: I saw Les Mis, Starlight Express, and everything that was on stage there. I just loved it. I knew what I wanted to do. I was like ‘I have a goal! This is my goal!’ (laughs) I was like Mike, in that sense. I had never thought farther ahead than the next day before that, and I was happy with that and…I’m still like that. (laughs) So I got back to Minnesota and was working in this machine shop, and my mentor, my acting teacher said “Look, they’re doing Biloxi Blues at this professional theater. Just like and say you’re in Equity and audition.” And I was like ‘Uh…okay.’ (laughs) So I went out and lied, and got the part. I told them I wasn’t Equity, and they said “Don’t worry, we’ll make you Equity.” And I got great reviews and was the guy that stuck out, and my co-workers were like “You’re good, man but you still have a ways to go. You need to study and figure things out.” They knew I was just a puppy. “Don’t get too sassy. Go learn.” One of my roommates suggested I go to the A.R.T. program at Harvard, which was basically the old program from Yale, but moved to Harvard. So I auditioned and got in there. It was a two year program, and was fantastic.

Was it an M.F.A. program?

No, it was very strange. We were Harvard students. We got IDs. We went to classes. We went to lectures, whatever we wanted, and yet I was committed to the theater and the institute there. Then at night, I was committed to working with the company. Now, it’s an M.F.A., with Theater Moscow. It didn’t really have its legs yet, because it was brand new, but was the “new Yale” drama program, but it was at Harvard. It was ideal, though because we didn’t have any pressure about getting grades. They were like “No, you’re absolved from getting grades,” and I was like ‘Fuckin’ A!’ (laughs)

The Wonders, from Tom Hanks’ That Thing You Do! L to R: Hanks, Jonathan Schaech, Liv Tyler, Ethan Embry, Tom Everett Scott, and Steve Zahn.

You did a lot of stage work in New York, then made your film debut in Reality Bites. But the film I really took notice of you in for the first time was Tom Hanks’ That Thing You Do!

That was just on TV last week. That movie’s so timeless. That was really the baptism for me. That was school. Tom really nurtured us in that. He had a tough job, but he really took the time to teach us. He’d say things like “Here’s what you do when you stand up in front of a camera. Don’t stand up too fast because…” and he would explain. And I really learned everything technically about film acting from Tom. Also about showing up for work on time, knowing your shit, setting the tone, all those things you kind of know on some level as a beginner, but it’s so helpful to have someone tell you. When you have someone like Tom Hanks say to you “When you’re a lead in a movie, you set the tone. If you come in late and not knowing what the fuck you’re doing, then that’s how the crew is going to be, that’s how your fellow actors are going to be,” and so on. And he was totally right about that. You do have to be that leader, and set that standard. He was brilliant, man.

So it’s different being directed by a fellow actor, as opposed to someone who’s just a director?

Oh yeah, for that very reason. He really understood the process. Any director who’s also acted understands the fact that every person has a different process and has to be approached differently. That doesn’t necessarily make for a better show. Sometimes that director is not good, because they’re just referring to their own experience and not taking your process into account. But that’s what so great about this job: every job is so fuckin’ different from the last. If I go through the last three years and all the things I’ve done, they’re all so different.

Zahn in Steven Soderbergh’s Out of Sight.

Speaking of different, your character in Out of Sight couldn’t have been more different from the guy in That Thing You Do! What was it like working with Steven Soderbergh and that amazing cast of actors?

Oh man, I loved that. The first time I saw it was at the premiere and I was sitting in front of (Don) Cheadle, and he said “Have you seen this yet, man?” “No.” And he was like “Fuck!” He was so excited that I was about to see it and that we were a part of it. It’s kind of like this movie. It’s such a nice feeling to be in a movie that you know is going to be considered to be very good, that’s going to be somebody’s favorite. Soderbergh just sort of lets you do your own thing. He’s the only director I’ve ever worked with who never really watches the monitor. He just watches the actors. I’m someone who kind of likes a lot of input from the director, but he doesn’t really do that.

Clint Eastwood is renowned for that.

Yeah, I really like that. And I love the fact that he doesn’t yell “Action!” I hate that shit! Soderbergh doesn’t do that, either. I mean, some directors are like (affected voice) “Okay everybody, here we go. Ready? 4, 3…ready to pretend? Remember, you’re not you. You’re someone else. And here we go, and…(yells) EVERYBODY QUIET! EVERYBODY QUIET! WE’RE ABOUT TO DO SOME MAGIC! EVERYBODY WATCH THE MAGIC!” And you’re just like ‘Fuckin’ shut up, man! You’re reminding me…’ “AND–ACTION!!” (laughs) Everybody knows what’s going on. Just turn the fuckin’ camera on. Please! (laughs)

Do you know who the director Sam Fuller was?

Yeah, I’ve heard of him.

Instead of saying “Action,” he used to shoot a .45 automatic into the air before each take.

(laughs) That’s awesome! I find a lot of time with new directors, they’re so…let’s say the final word of the scene is “bird,” okay. So you’re saying ‘So that’s why we killed the bird.” “CUT!” (laughs) You just want to say ‘Dude, film is really cheap, just let it go for a while.’ (laughs)

Tell us about being in the universe of Werner Herzog with Rescue Dawn.

Oh, that was totally different from anything I’ve ever experienced. He’s just an artist, pure and simple. There’s no defining him or figuring him out. The minute you think you have him pegged, he’s different the next day. And the trap is to be preoccupied with trying to figure him out. And once you give into that, and just say ‘You know what, that’s just the way he is, and this is going to be kind of chaotic,’ then you’re good. And Christian (Bale) and I understood that right off, and we work really similarly and became really close, which helped make that film a really great, fun experience. I was so into that film. We didn’t get paid a lot. It was a small movie, but I felt very connected to it. It was something I had to be a part of. Werner’s documentary Little Dieter Needs to Fly, which the film was based on, changed my life. That movie is brilliant. It’s so inspiring. So when I found out he was making a dramatic film of the story, I knew I had to be a part of it, and I’m very lucky that he let me be. I’d never played a real person before. I have a picture of Duane, the real Duane, on my fridge. The minute I wanted to cheat, I would just look at his picture and…there was no cheating. I felt a real responsibility there. Dieter’s wife and kids visited our set in Thailand during the shoot. His wife walked in, looked at us, and just had to leave. It wasn’t a “set,” per se. Werner liked to keep things “If you don’t need to be here, you’re not here.”

Zahn and Christian Bale in Werner Herzog’s harrowing Rescue Dawn.

What’s his process like in terms of how he works with actors?

I don’t know. (laughs) Dude, I’m telling you…he loves actors. He admires the process. He’ll lose weight with you and he’ll be the first to dive in the river to show you there’s no rocks and that it’s safe. I like that about him. But there’s another part of him that doesn’t want to feel anything. It changes every day. One day you’ll do something and he’ll just get up, come over and hug you. And it’s kind of weird and out of the blue, and it’s him telling you that it was great. Then the next day, it’s like he doesn’t notice anything. He yells at somebody, and yells at you, and he walks away. And it’s fuckin’ crazy! (laughs) But I loved it, and I love him to death. I really do.

Any final thoughts about Management before we wrap up?

I just hope that it’s a film that people discover and will continue to discover years from now. And if it takes years, that’s okay, too. But I sure would like to be in one finally that people see and does a little bit of business. (laughs) Go see it!

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© ℗ 2014 Patriotic Music Unlimited

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Mozart: Symphonies Nos. 25, 33, 40 "Great" & 41 "Jupiter"

Mozart Festival Orchestra

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