‘The Mighty Ducks’ Goalie Shaun Weiss Stuck in Downward Spiral

Shaun Weiss — who played Goldberg in “The Mighty Ducks” — has been in a downward spiral for years, according to a longtime friend who is worried about the former child star’s fate. The friend, Marni Gairhan, has known Shaun for more than 13 years, and…

Permalink

TMZ Celebrity News for Celebrity Justice


‘The Mighty Ducks’ Goalie Shaun Weiss Stuck in Downward Spiral

Shaun Weiss — who played Goldberg in “The Mighty Ducks” — has been in a downward spiral for years, according to a longtime friend who is worried about the former child star’s fate. The friend, Marni Gairhan, has known Shaun for more than 13 years, and…

Permalink

TMZ Celebrity News for Celebrity Justice


The Song Stuck In Your Head Doesn’t Want To Be There Either

The Song Stuck In Your Head Doesn't Want To Be There Either

The Song Stuck In Your Head Doesn't W…
It’s no picnic in there.
Submitted by: Sonya Saepoff
Regular
Keywords: carly rae jepsen nirvana come as you are call me maybe
Views: 21,650

Funny Or Die | Funny Videos, Funny Video Clips, Funny Pics

Yes, We Stuck With ‘American Idol’

Maddie Poppe won the show, rebooted on ABC with a new cast of judges. What worked, what didn’t and who really stood out? Two longtime “Idol” enthusiasts discuss.
Rock Music
Chat Live!
Join Group Chat!

Beyonce’s Hair Didn’t Get Stuck in SoulCycle Bike

Beyonce was not left shaking after her hair got stuck in a SoulCycle bike … because IT NEVER HAPPENED. Our sources say a story floating around that Bey’s weave got tangled up in a bike back in February at the L.A. studio — requiring staff to…

Permalink

TMZ Celebrity News for Gossip Rumors


Kristen Bell entertains while stuck in Florida

Kristen Bell was stuck in Florida over the weekend and helped brighten the day for a group of Hurricane Irma evacuees.


CNN.com – RSS Channel – Entertainment

GamersGate: The World's Largest Online Game Store

Stuck In The Middle

Angela Sommers teaches her teen stepdaughter Jenna Sativa a lesson for hiding the truth about her lesbian relationship with Ziggy Starr. Jewels Jade lovingly tucks her stepdaughter Angie Smalls into bed and soothes her after the tiny teen twists her ankle on the stairs. Newly married Ariella Ferrera tries breastfeeding to establish a motherly bond with her stepdaughter Charlotte Cross. Stepmother Eva Notty offers to help when she walks in on her stepdaughter Lilly Ford trying to achieve her first orgasm. Stepmother Angela Sommers proves her love to Jenna Sativa after shes caught in bed with the teens girlfriend.

Watch the Full Length, High Quality Movie!

Newly married Ariella Ferrera tries breastfeeding to establish a motherly bond with her stepdaughter Charlotte Cross.

Stars: Charlotte O’Ryan Ariella Ferrera

Categories: High Definition Taboo All Girl M.I.L.F. Teen Lesbian

Scene Number: 3

Orientation: Straight

Studio Name: Girlsway Mommys Girl

Lesbian Pay Per View

Stuck In The Middle

Angela Sommers teaches her teen stepdaughter Jenna Sativa a lesson for hiding the truth about her lesbian relationship with Ziggy Starr. Jewels Jade lovingly tucks her stepdaughter Angie Smalls into bed and soothes her after the tiny teen twists her ankle on the stairs. Newly married Ariella Ferrera tries breastfeeding to establish a motherly bond with her stepdaughter Charlotte Cross. Stepmother Eva Notty offers to help when she walks in on her stepdaughter Lilly Ford trying to achieve her first orgasm. Stepmother Angela Sommers proves her love to Jenna Sativa after shes caught in bed with the teens girlfriend.

Watch the Full Length, High Quality Movie!

Newly married Ariella Ferrera tries breastfeeding to establish a motherly bond with her stepdaughter Charlotte Cross.

Stars: Charlotte O’Ryan Ariella Ferrera

Categories: High Definition Taboo All Girl M.I.L.F. Teen Lesbian

Scene Number: 3

Orientation: Straight

Studio Name: Girlsway Mommys Girl

M.I.L.F. Payperview

Gabby Douglas Stuck This Look Like A True Champion

It’s an all-around win.
Fashion News, Celebrity Style and Fashion Trends – HuffPost Style
FASHION NEWS UPDATE-Visit Shoe Deals Online today for the hottest deals online for shoes!

Symba Ft. Marc E. Bassy – “Stuck In My Ways”

Following a strong response to the first leak from his upcoming album “2 More Words”, Symba calls on fellow Bay Area artist Marc E. Bassy for his new single “Stuck In My Ways”. Produced by No Name Tim. You can expect the full project to drop early September.


Filed under: Music Tagged: Marc E Bassy, Symba
AllHipHop

Sports News in Brief: Jason Witten Can’t Believe He Stuck Rooming With Jerry Jones During Training Camp Again

OXNARD, CA—Saying that he is counting down the days until the offseason practices are over, Dallas Cowboys tight end Jason Witten told reporters Thursday that he can’t believe he was once again stuck sharing a hotel room with owner Jerry Jones during training camp. “Goddammit, this is the fifth straight year they’ve paired us together,” said Witten, explaining that he has come to dread returning to his room each afternoon to find Jones sitting on his bed drinking bottles of Michelob Ultra and watching television at its maximum volume. “He never picks up any of his dirty clothes or trash—Christ, just look at all these copies of Maxim around the room. Plus, when I’m trying to go to sleep at night, all he wants to do is talk about that day’s practice and what the team should be working on before the season starts …




The Onion

Stuck in the Middle – Virginia Smith

Virginia Smith - Stuck in the Middle  artwork

Stuck in the Middle

A Novel

Virginia Smith

Genre: Contemporary

Publish Date: February 1, 2008

Publisher: Revell

Seller: Baker Book House Company


Joan Sanderson's life is stuck. Her older sister, Allie, is starting a family and her younger sister, Tori, has a budding career. Meanwhile, Joan is living at home with Mom and looking after her aging grandmother. Not exactly a recipe for excitement. That is, until a hunky young doctor moves in next door. Suddenly Joan has a goal–to get a date. But it won't be easy. Pretty Tori flirts relentlessly with him and Joan is sure that she can't compete. But with a little help from God, Allie, and an enormous mutt with bad manners, maybe Joan can find her way out of this rut. Book 1 of the Sister-to-Sister series, Stuck in the Middle combines budding romance, spiritual searching, and a healthy dose of sibling rivalry.

iTunes Store: Top Free Books in Romance

Stuck In Love – Josh Boone

Josh Boone - Stuck In Love  artwork

Stuck In Love

Josh Boone

Genre: Comedy

Price: $ 9.99

Rental Price: $ 3.99

Release Date: July 5, 2013


From first-time feature film writer-director Josh Boone and Judy Cairo, producer of CRAZY HEART, comes a comically rich yet emotionally raw romantic drama about a family of writers who have lost the plot of their own love stories. Featuring an all-star cast, STUCK IN LOVE reveals how even amidst the trials and tribulations of marriage, divorce, parenting and coming of age, the family ties that trip us up can turn into a lifeline.

© © 2012 Writers the Movie, LLC.

iTunes Store: Top Movies in Independent

Love Him or Leave Him, But Don’t Get Stuck with the Tab: Hilarious Advice for Real Women (Unabridged) – Loni Love, Jeannine Amber

Loni Love, Jeannine Amber - Love Him or Leave Him, But Don't Get Stuck with the Tab: Hilarious Advice for Real Women (Unabridged)  artwork

Love Him or Leave Him, But Don’t Get Stuck with the Tab: Hilarious Advice for Real Women (Unabridged)

Loni Love, Jeannine Amber

Genre: Comedy

Price: $ 15.95

Publish Date: July 30, 2013

© ℗ © 2013 Simon & Schuster Audio

iTunes Store: Top Audiobooks in Comedy

Pup Calls Adorable Ceasefire On These Two Dogs Stuck In Serious Gridlock

This pup just wants everyone to give peace a chance.

After watching her mother, Nancy, and brother, Bosco, remain in a deadlocked game of tug-of-war, Casley the dog decided to intervene, shown in the video above.

According to its description, the video was first shared on Facebook where it quickly went viral — and we completely understand why.

Watch as the pair of pups, with noses smooshed together, clutch the tennis ball with no signs of letting go. Casley comes along to break up the little disagreement and sticks her head on the pair’s snouts.

While it doesn’t seem that she really helped solve the problem, we’re happy she tried. If only there were more Casleys in the world.

Like Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Comedy – The Huffington Post
ENTERTAINMENT NEWS-Visit Mobile Playboy today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

7 Questions To Ask Yourself If Your Relationship Feels Stuck

If your relationship is in trouble, then you have to be willing to admit that whatever you are thinking and feeling and doing is not working. You have to be willing to move your position on some very deep beliefs and long-held emotions and behavioral patterns. When I say “move your position,” I mean that you must be willing to utterly change the way you think, feel, and act in relationship to yourself and your partner. This can be harder than you could ever imagine. I am asking you to give up your security blankets and free-fall. I am asking you to hit the erase button on ideas that you may have been holding for 10, 20, 30 or 40 years. I am asking you to wipe the slate clean and start over in your thinking. Bottom line, I am asking you to believe, once again, that you are a qualified person who deserves a quality relationship. Getting back in touch with your core of consciousness will remind and convince you that there is nothing wrong with you that justifies your having less than a rewarding relationship in which you can live, love, and laugh every day of your life.

Are you ready to embrace a new kind of thinking, a new belief system, a new way of looking at yourself and your partner? To see if you’re ready to move forward, answer the following questions:

1. Can you forget what you think you know about managing relationships?
2. Can you decide to measure the quality of your relationship based on results instead of intentions or promises?
3. Can you decide that you would rather be happy than right?
4. Can you stop playing the blame game and recognize that it is a new day?
5. Can you be willing to move your position on how you approach and engage your partner?
6. Can you be willing to get real and be honest with yourself, about yourself, no matter how painful it is?
7. Can you stop the denial and be completely, totally honest about the state of your current relationship?

I know that right now it may be difficult for you to honestly answer yes to all of those questions. Either way, don’t give up, at least not until I tell you two very important things.

First: It is not too late. If you do not allow yourself to believe and accept that, you will think your way out of this relationship before we have the chance to save it. You may think your relationship has failed, you may feel like you have tried everything, you may feel tired, deflated and defeated, but I’m telling you, you have to get that thought out of your head or you are dead in the water with an anvil tied around your ankle. No matter how many times you’ve been hurt — no matter how many times you’ve been disappointed, no matter how many times you’ve believed it could be different only to be blindsided again — you have to be willing to give yourself one more chance. Even if you have hurt so long and so badly that you aren’t at all sure if you care whether your relationship survives; even if you’re not sure you can ever subject yourself to any more pain from a relationship; even if you do not feel motivated or very hopeful, you can start getting out of your ditch if you will just say to yourself, “I wish I felt good about my relationship again.” That’s all we need. If all you can muster in your mind and heart is to say, “I wish I felt good about this relationship again, and I wish I felt lovingly toward this person again, because I know that at least at one time in my life those emotions felt good,” then that is enough of an ember for us to fan into a flame.

Second: You are not alone. You might feel bewildered and demoralized right now, engulfed by the loneliness that comes with a deteriorating relationship. You may feel intimidated and overwhelmed by what may seem like insurmountable problems or hurts that tend to run so very, very deep. But I want you to know that from now on, you have a partner. You have a partner who is willing to walk with you through this intimidating maze of emotion and who is willing to interact without judgment or criticism, but with the willingness and courage to tell you the truth. I am going to be that partner for you. I have now counseled thousands of people and taught tens of thousands in seminars, helping them create and maintain the key relationships in their lives. I have learned what you know and, more important, what you don’t know about sharing your life with another person. I have designed this approach to meet you at whatever point you find yourself in your relationship and give you the power to make changes — power that can come only from learning the absolute naked, unvarnished truth. Indeed, once you learn the real truth about how you got into this mess, and then once you learn what you can do to get rid of the mess, you will shudder to think you almost walked away. You are closer to success than you could ever imagine, if you just have the courage to get real with yourself.

You must take a stand that you are not going to defy the odds, defy your own insecurities, and defy the conventional wisdom that has failed you so miserably. Set this personal standard for yourself from the very beginning. Adopt a philosophy of passion that says, “I will not quit. I will not allow my hopes and dreams to be pushed aside.” Never forget, this life is your only shot. This is no dress rehearsal. You must be willing to reach for what you want and reach right now. And if you are willing to settle for less, then that is exactly what you will get.

You must not forget about the importance of your relationship with yourself. You must demand nothing less than the best of yourself and for yourself. You must tell yourself that it is not wrong to want it all. It is not wrong to demand dignity, love, honor and romance in your life. You must decide that you are worthy of everything that you want. You must decide that peace, joy, and abundance in a relationship is not just for other people. It is for you. It is not selfish to want it, it is not naive to want it, and it is not immature to expect it. What is immature is to sell out and settle for less than what you really want.

It is not wrong to want, expect, demand, and aspire to a relationship in which you are treated with honor, dignity, and respect. It is not unrealistic to believe that your mate can and should be your soft place to fall. It is not a pipe dream to believe that God has provided for you another person in this world whom you can trust with your most intimate and vulnerable secrets and needs.

I am not suggesting that blind optimism or denial about the risks is the right approach. I am not telling you to pretend that there are not problems, or that they will go away. I am asking you to exercise the belief within yourself that you can do this, and that your relationship can be much better. I have often said, “Sometimes we make the right decision, and sometimes we have to make the decision right.”

You might not like having to blow up a bunch of deceptive but highly destructive myths about what makes a relationship work, and you might not like having to confront the truth about yourself — but I predict that you will love the outcome. You will love that you will be able to reprogram yourself for success rather than failure, that you will be able to go from an individual hoping for a future to an individual making your future happen. And then both you and your partner can begin working to get what you want, to stop the pain that both of you are feeling, and to create more peace, love, and the deepest of joy in your relationship.

Modified excerpt from Relationship Rescue: A Seven-Step Strategy For Reconnecting With Your Partner by Phillip C. McGraw, PhD (Hyperion).

Need Dr. Phil’s help in your life? Share your story here.

Like Dr. Phil | Follow Dr. Phil | Be on the Show | Ask Dr. Phil

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Dr. Phil – The Huffington Post

30 Days of Online Dating: Stuck in the Friend Zone

This is a modern dating experiment. One girl. Five dating sites. Hundreds of chats. Thirty days. Thirty dates. Eighteen guys. (?) boyfriend. To start at the beginning, click here — or jump right in at date nineteen below.

Date 19/30: Friend Zone Ryan*

In the midst of my experiment, who should appear, but a blast from the not-so-distant past. Friend Zone Ryan and I have been pals for a few years now, starting back when we used to be neighbors-ish. We sort of hooked up a couple times that first summer, with me pumping the brakes pretty swiftly. FZR stopped trying and I proceeded to pine away. Because there’s nothing more addictive than that oscillating trifecta of affection, ambivalence, and disinterest.

A few months ago, he skipped my birthday for a stupid reason and I decided we weren’t friends anymore. The next week, I ran into him at a mutual friend’s party and decided his reason was totally valid and we were totally still friends. A few shots, one very platonic sleepover, and a room service brunch later, FZR was dropping me off at home, saying he was going to take me out for a birthday dinner.

And then I never heard from him. We were so not friends anymore.

Until last Monday.

Walking home from a writing session, I hear my name being shouted from a familiar vehicle. Oh, hello stranger. Brief catch-up sesh. We’re still friends.

FZR: I still owe you dinner!
Me: Oh, that’s right – you totally do. [So much nonchalance.]
FZR: Just let me know when and where…

He continues on to his office; I head back home. We may still be friends, but I have zero expectation of a follow-up to this conversation.

A few hours later…

FZR: Where/when are we dining?

Well, color me surprised.

I slot him in for Thursday (So weird how calendar space can open up like that!) and suggest a smattering of restaurants that run the gamut from casual/trendy to fine dining. He makes a reservation at Hatfield’s — or, as the LA Times termed it back in 2010, a gracious restaurant for grownups. Look, Ma — I’m a grownup!

Really excited for this best friends forever reunion dinner. Right? This is a friend thing. Totally a friend thing. Not a date. Why would it be a date? That’d be weird. Gross. No way.

…I’m a child.

FZR’s house is pretty dead center between my place and Hatfield’s, so he sends an Uber to grab me, with further instructions to swoop him up en route. Belted in the backseat, it doesn’t take FZR long to inquire about my personal life. I pause. We’ve never really talked about our personal lives before. Is this his way of making it clear that this is a BFF situation? Or is this him attempting to get a clearer view of the landscape before the night’s momentum kicks in?

I decide he’s asking because he heard about my 30 Days of Online Dating from one of our mutual friends, and is just trying to make conversation without coming off like a stalker. I delve in real deep to the stories of my multiple suitors. He hadn’t heard about my project. Oh, that’s cool. NBD. This is just me cementing my feet in the friendliest of areas.

FZR is all manners and charm every step of the way, as per usual. Be still my etiquette-obsessed heart. We cozily settle into the back corner table — my favorite spot in almost every restaurant. (Feel free to pocket that piece of information for future use, gentlemen.)

Over the Croque Madame, we chat recent trips, etc. Just a month before, I had travelled to his hometown for the very first time. “Why didn’t you tell me you were going?” Because you said you were going to take me to dinner and then you never called, so I decided we definitely weren’t friends anymore? In lieu of way too much truth, I fumble out something about not knowing why I didn’t, but I should have, and would absolutely hit him up for the phone-guided tour next time around.

Thankfully, the next course arrives to alleviate my awkward. Momentarily. Just as I’m about to take a bite of buttery black cod, FZR launches into a story about a girl he was recently set up with by a friend of ours. Apparently, she is just as smart and witty as I am, and he totally f*cked it up. Of course she is. Of course you did. Did I mention this cod is delicious? The topic of my brainy twin somehow bleeds into 50 Shades of Grey, a book I have not read and refuse to endorse. FZR says he has encountered more than a few senoritas suffering from post-Christian Grey syndrome — they come into the bedroom hot, but not necessarily in a good way. Oh man! All this talk of whores has me dying for another cocktail.



We’re still friends. Just friends.

The LA Times said we were not to miss Hatfield’s “sugar and spice beignets shaped like soft little pillows and served warm with a complex Venezuelan chocolate fondue and a charming milkshake shot dressed up with preserved ginger”. So we don’t. FZR immediately spills the charming milkshake shot, attempting to slice into one of those soft-ish pillows. The server’s there in seconds to clean it up, assuring us that it happens all the time.

FZR: Thank you for that; I appreciate you trying to make me look better in front of her. Isn’t she the best date ever — didn’t even skip a beat.

My pathetically slutty lashes flutter at the D word. Calm yourself, children; it’s merely a polite turn of phrase. Seriously, stop that. You’re making us all look bad.

We Uber me home; FZR walks me to my door; we say goodbyes.

FZR: If you feel like going out and getting really drunk, you know who to call.

Right. Yes. Yes, I do. I might just go ahead and wait a few weeks for my dignity to piece itself together, though, if that’s cool with everyone.

We’re still totally friends.**

*not his real name
**We really are, though. FZR, if you’re reading this — don’t make it weird.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Comedy – The Huffington Post
ENTERTAINMENT NEWS-Visit Mobile Playboy today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

How Not to Get Stuck in Your Story | Super Soul Sunday | Oprah Winfrey Network

Motivational speaker and life coach Tim Storey has worked with people of all walks of life, including the rich and famous, and says no one is immune to experiencing setbacks. How you deal with them, Tim says, is key.

Find OWN on TV at http://www.oprah.com/FindOWN

SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/1vqD1PN

“Super Soul Sunday” is a two-time Emmy award-winning series that delivers a thought-provoking, eye-opening and inspiring block of programming designed to help viewers awaken to their best selves and discover a deeper connection to the world around them. The series features exclusive interviews and all-new conversations between Oprah Winfrey and top thinkers, authors, filmmakers and spiritual leaders. Exploring themes and issues including happiness, personal fulfillment, wellness, spirituality and conscious living. “Super Soul Sunday” presents an array of perspectives on what it means to be alive in today’s world.

Oprah Winfrey Network is the first and only network named for, and inspired by, a single iconic leader. Oprah Winfrey’s heart and creative instincts inform the brand — and the magnetism of the channel.

Winfrey provides leadership in programming and attracts superstar talent to join her in primetime, building a global community of like-minded viewers and leading that community to connect on social media and beyond. OWN is a singular destination on cable. Depth with edge. Heart. Star power. Connection. And endless possibilities.

Discover OWN TV:
Find OWN on you TV!: http://bit.ly/1wJ0ugI
Our Fantastic Lineup: http://bit.ly/1qMi2jE

Connect with OWN Online:
Visit the OWN WEBSITE: http://bit.ly/1qMi2jE
Like OWN on FACEBOOK: http://on.fb.me/1AXYujp
Follow OWN on TWITTER: http://bit.ly/1sJin8Y
Follow OWN on INSTAGRAM: http://bit.ly/LnqzMz
Follow OWN on PINTEREST: http://bit.ly/1u0CqR6

How Not to Get Stuck in Your Story | Super Soul Sunday | Oprah Winfrey Network
http://www.youtube.com/user/OWN
Uploads by OWN TV

Theater: “Hunchback” Sings; Ibsen Stuck in Stone For “Posterity”

THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME ** out of ****
POSTERITY * 1/2 out of ****

THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME ** out of ****
PAPERMILL PLAYHOUSE

This musical version of Victor Hugo’s sprawling melodrama has had its eye on Broadway ever since James Lapine turned the Disney animated film into live theater for Germany back in the 1990s. After many years and much tinkering, I’m afraid a happy ending on Broadway is as unlikely as a happy ending for the disfigured Quasimodo. But it isn’t for lack of trying: the show boasts truly excellent singing from its four leads, huge vocal support from the Continuo Arts Symphonic Chorus that certainly adds punch to the show’s many, many climactic moments and superior playing from the orchestra conducted by musical director Brent-Alan Huffman. Quite simply, this work could not ask for a better showcase. The many failings on display are strictly its own.

For all the Les Miz-like sprawl on display, the story is simple and can be quickly reduced to three men all in love — to varying degrees — with one woman. The religious leader of the Church of Notre Dame is Dom Claude Frollo (Patrick Page). He’s always been drawn to a life of strict denial, perhaps in response to his wayward brother Jehan. The more fun-loving Jehan (a memorable Jeremy Stolle in
a small role) falls in love with a gypsy, is banished from their home in Notre Dame and dies, leaving only the deformed child Quasimodo. Frollo raises the boy in the belfry with a confused mixture of love and sternness, seeing the child’s outward ugliness as a sign of Jehan’s sin.

They are both bewitched by the gypsy Esmerelda (Ciara Renée), who enters Paris for the annual Festival of Fools. Esmerelda (Ciara Renee) is kind to the now-adult hunchback (Michael Arden), wary of the feverishly enraptured Frollo and flirty with the handsome new Captain of the Guards Phoebus (Andrew Samonsky). Frollo becomes more and more obsessed with this gypsy — this reminder of his brother’s fall — and he is determined somehow to have her carnally and save her soul. Since both are hardly possible, it’s no surprise when he turns on her, damns Esmerelda as a witch and rouses the guards to hunt her down and burn her at the stake. It falls to Quasimodo to claim “Sanctuary! Sanctuary!” by swinging into action, rescuing the beautiful and sweet woman and taking her to his home in the belfry, holding off seemingly all of Paris in the process. Oh, and there’s a lot of singing.

Needless to say, it doesn’t end well. This version retains most of the songs written by Stephen Schwartz and Alan Menken for the film, including some which weren’t even originally used. It has a new book by Peter Parnell and a great deal of sound and fury. Seemingly every other scene ends with a clamor; when you’ve got lots of bells and a full choir on stage, the temptation to use it all is resisted about as well as Frolo’s desire for flesh. He punishes the gypsy girl; the show punishes us by starting at full volume and never stopping. Subtlety was never really called for in a melodrama like this. But when not seeming like a poor cousin to Les Miserables, the show feels like all peaks and no valleys.

The two romantic leads are cardboard cutouts on paper. Renée adds some genuine charm as Esmerelda but Samonsky feels resolutely modern as Phoebus. Patrick Page fares much better as the conflicted Frollo but it’s almost entirely to his presence. Certainly would-be big numbers like “Hellfire” add nothing to his role. Indeed, all the songs blend together, whether rousing openers like “The Bells Of Notre Dame,” tunes of yearning like “Out There” or romantic ballads like “Someday.” Those who are musically inclined will appreciate the complexity of the score, the motifs for characters that are repeated throughout and the Latin choral work drawing on classic religious melodies for the act two curtain raiser. But no one will be singing them. There’s a reason the film has not earned its place in the Disney canon.

Certainly the staging doesn’t help. The scenic design by Alexander Dodge manages to be both very busy, even cluttered really in the margins while almost non-existent for the main action. It’s the worst of both worlds, with countless stairs and ramps leading to nowhere interesting but just a few pieces of removable railing to suggest the soaring balcony high above Paris. (When Quasimodo straddles one and scares Esmerelda by pretending to fall, I was a little worried too since it was so rickety the railing trembled.)

But The Hunchback Of Notre Dame truly falls apart with a shocking lack of theatrical imagination at the finale. Anyone who has seen the various feature film and TV movie versions (notably Charles Laughton in the greatest of them all from 1939) will remember that action-packed climax. Quasimodo swoops in to rescue Esmerelda, scales the walls of Notre Dame and pours boiling oil from the belfry to ward off attackers among other derring-do. If you can’t think of an interesting, theatrically exciting way to do this finale, why would you stage it at all?

Instead, this show mostly just stops and describes what happens during the final pages of the book. As in having a chorus member step forward and say, “And then Quasimodo….” Ludicrously, when the hunchback is scaling the outside wall, this is illustrated by having actors “pose” as the wall and having Quasimodo weave in and out of them as he walks across the stage. It looks more like he’s wandering a garden maze and of course it takes place from stage right to stage left when what you want is to have Quasimodo descend or ascend a great height.

Similarly, the boiling pitch is banally and ineffectively depicted as a silky banner while the throwing of a body from the belfry — the emotional peak of the story — is also very poorly handled. All of this constitutes what should be a crescendo of action after two hours of mostly internal strife. Instead it’s quite bereft of any theatrical magic from director Scott Schwartz and his creative team; the climax is the first thing they should have tackled and solved but in fact they never came close to figuring it out. Not helping matters is the mawkish, misguided flourish at the “Finale Ultimo” in which the chorus insists that there is literally a little Quasimodo in all of us. (The only theatrical magic to be found at all is a modest but effective bit in which a beheaded statue talks to Quasimodo; it’s simple but engaging.)

So stick figure characters, unmemorable songs and a bungled climax. What should be an utter failure is actually watchable thanks to the assembled cast. Page holds the stage throughout and makes you believe in his turmoil even when the writing and songs give him little to work with. Stolle was distinctive enough as his brother to leave a memory of that man an effective touchstone for the rest of the show. (Stolle certainly deserved more than a credit as “Ensemble” in his bio for this small part.) Joseph J. Simeone is a stand-out in the hardworking chorus. The music is too insistent but it’s sung powerfully and played beautifully, thanks to the trio of musical supervisor Michael Kosarin, orchestrator Michael Starobin and music director and conductor Huffman. They do sterling work.

That leaves Quasimodo, played by Michael Arden. I can’t call it a star-making turn because the role isn’t remotely good enough. Besides, there’s not enough Quasimodo in the show. The character almost disappears for chunks of time in a musical that is, after all, named for him. Nonetheless, Arden makes a strong impression, from the opener — where the handsome but approachable Arden is transformed onstage via a few modest touches into Quasimodo — right to the finale.

He keeps this easily cliched character from slipping into bathos, letting only a few modest fawning gestures towards Frollo tell us what we need to know about this beaten-down fellow. When alone, Quasimodo stands a little taller and belts out in a truly beautiful and powerful voice. When other characters are present, he sinks down lower and sings more awkwardly, meaning Arden transitions back and forth throughout the show, giving varied shadings to his speaking and singing based on Quasimodo’s emotional state. He never belabors the point or calls attention to it; both as actor and singer, Arden is excellent.

The show asks about the difference between a monster and a man. Which leads one to ask, what’s the difference between a talented actor and a star? A great role in a great show, I think. Hopefully Arden will land one soon.

POSTERITY * 1/2 out of ****
ATLANTIC THEATER COMPANY AT LINDA GROSS THEATER

Plays about famous artists crossing paths with one another (or with artists we know will fade into obscurity) are irresistible to playwrights, apparently. Whether these meetings are real or imagined, thoroughly documented or left to the imagination, you know that Art will be discussed and debated, chuckles drawn from now-dated comments like “Movies are a fad and will soon disappear!” or some such thing and the judgement of History hangs heavy.

All the pitfalls of such endeavors are unfortunately present in Posterity, the new drama written and directed by Pulitzer Prize winner Doug Wright. It boils down to two main scenes.

In one, sculptor Gustav Vigeland (Hamish Linklater) is on the brink of securing a commission to create his masterwork. (He will ultimately become Norway’s most famous sculptor.) However, in order to gain this opportunity he must convince the towering, world famous, aging but obstinate playwright Henrik Ibsen to sit for one final bust, a concrete expression of his fame. They fence intellectually, playfully and fiercely, with Vigeland seizing on everything from flattery to insult to suggesting history will forget him in an effort to bend the unbending Ibsen.

In the second scene, sudden illness has prompted a death watch at the great man’s home while Ibsen musters the strength for a sitting that soon turns into a confession of his many personal failings.

Ultimately, neither scene truly works.

Like the show, technical elements are spotty. Derek McLane’s set for the working studio of Vigeland is gorgeous and convincing, with soft lighting from David Lander adding immeasurably to the effect. The costumes by Susan Hilferty are similarly on target.

However, a switch to the home of Ibsen is rather bizarrely handled in act two. Suddenly, for no discernible reason, three large oil paintings are brought out and arrayed across the front of the stage, all of them portraits. One might think they were portraits of Ibsen, Vigeland and Vigeland’s manager Sophus Larpent (Henry Stram). Who else could they be? But since they are soon placed on the walls of Ibsen’s home, clearly it couldn’t be the latter two. But why are they paraded out and placed in front of us? A spotlight is focused on one and then the other and then the other. Why? Is it to distract us from the set change taking place? Whatever the reason, their mysterious appearance in such prominent positions at such a key moment, never to be referenced again, was puzzling to say the least.

Worse was the incidental scene-setting music of David Van Tieghem (who also did the fine sound design). It’s melodramatic and ponderous in the extreme, emphasizing and calling attention to the weakest elements of the show. No music is needed and the little offered here unfortunately weighed down an already shaky show.

Dale Soules and Mickey Theis are saddled with unfortunate minor characters. Soules has a speech at the very start where this elderly domestic mocks her penny pinching employer. Soules I sense is a fine actor doing her best in a poor part. But it’s the sort of scene opener that immediately makes clear this show will hit mostly false notes. You don’t buy this woman who has a husband and child dependent on her would speak out so mockingly when her job is at stake; indeed she never shows similar spunk the rest of the evening. So it’s entirely out of character and unconvincing. Soules is not at fault, though. Theis however is woefully miscast as Vigeland’s assistant. He may be one of those actors who simply doesn’t convince in period pieces. It surely doesn’t help that his role is a muddle as well.

Every time these two take center stage we feel the play is killing time until the inevitable showdown between the sculptor and the playwright. We simply don’t care about them and the play never gives us a reason to do so or even a reason to accept them as real. Stram has it little better as the patron/manager (another ill-defined character in a show with only five). Stram is a pro and at least creates the illusion of one for a while.

So we’re down to those two sparring sessions. In the first, Linklater seemed rushed and uncertain the night I attended. He’s one of my favorite actors and I felt Linklater was trying to gin up some emotion, some enthusiasm for this tired debate about Art and Life and Posterity. The writing just wasn’t there and he knew it or at least sensed something was missing and struggled to bring it to life.

Noble fared much better in that first scene. He entered and the restless audience immediately sat up straight. The silly simpering of the servants wasn’t needed for us to understand: this is a formidable man. Noble commanded attention by simple force of will. With two such skilled actors, it was inevitable that even this forced exchange of philosophies would be somewhat entertaining. But it fell into a predictable rhythm right down to a joke about James Joyce. (It’s this show’s equivalent of “Cars will never replace horses”.)

Noble certainly hoped for better in their second scene, which has a long, soul-baring monologue for the frosty, proud Ibsen. He does a marvelous job physically as the broken down man who hears the beating wings of Death (as we’re told repeatedly). But that monologue is too clearly a Monologue and goes on too long. Or to be more accurate, isn’t interesting and varied enough to sustain our interest for the time it lasts. The details of his revealed flaws are at first poignant but become maudlin after Wright drags out the moment well past its breaking point. Poor Linklater is reduced to murmuring the occasional “Yes” and “Mm-hmm” as Ibsen goes on and on, though Noble brings what dignity and dramatic powers he can to bear.

That scene is modestly effective if attenuated…and then Posterity spoils whatever glow Noble and Linklater give it with a final plot twist that is pure, unearned bathos. One needn’t wait for the judgment of posterity to know this isn’t one for the ages.

THEATER OF 2015

Honeymoon In Vegas **
The Woodsman ***
Constellations ** 1/2
Taylor Mac’s A 24 Decade History Of Popular Music 1930s-1950s ** 1/2
Let The Right One In **
Da no rating
A Month In The Country ** 1/2
Parade in Concert at Lincoln Center ** 1/2
Hamilton at the Public ***
The World Of Extreme Happiness ** 1/2
Broadway By The Year 1915-1940 **
Verite * 1/2
Fabulous! *
The Mystery Of Love & Sex **
An Octoroon at Polonsky Shakespeare Center *** 1/2
Fish In The Dark *
The Audience ***
Josephine And I ***
Posterity * 1/2
The Hunchback Of Notre Dame **

_____________

Thanks for reading. Michael Giltz is the founder and CEO of the forthcoming website BookFilter, a book lover’s best friend. It’s a website that lets you browse for books online the way you do in a physical bookstore, provides comprehensive info on new releases every week in every category and offers passionate personal recommendations every step of the way. It’s like a fall book preview or holiday gift guide — but every week in every category. He’s also the cohost of Showbiz Sandbox, a weekly pop culture podcast that reveals the industry take on entertainment news of the day and features top journalists and opinion makers as guests. It’s available for free on iTunes. Visit Michael Giltz at his website and his daily blog. Download his podcast of celebrity interviews and his radio show, also called Popsurfing and also available for free on iTunes.

Note: Michael Giltz is provided with free tickets to shows with the understanding that he will be writing a review. All productions are in New York City unless otherwise indicated.
Entertainment – The Huffington Post
Entertainment News-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

Hot Tip Alert!

Click here for more.

Big Sean: ‘I Stuck With My Gut’

“I made a promise to myself,” says the Detroit rapper. “I would never ever not follow my heart again. That way if I rise or fall, sink or swim, it’s by my own choice and my own decisions.”

» E-Mail This

Hip-Hop
ADULT ENTERTAINMENT NEWS UPDATE:Gabby Love’s top pick! Click and enjoy!

The ‘Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt’ Theme Song Will Be Stuck In Our Heads All Weekend

There’s a lot to love about Netflix’s new comedy from Tina Fey and Robert Carlock, “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt.” Aside from Ellie Kemper’s sunny demeanor, Jane Krakowski’s absurdity and the entire premise that Kemper is a former cult member reintroduced into society, its theme song is already stuck in our heads less than 24 hours after the show premiered.

The track debuts in the first two minutes of the show as a “viral video” taken from a news segment about freeing the “mole women.” Luckily, it plays during every episode.


Comedy – The Huffington Post
ENTERTAINMENT NEWS-Visit Mobile Playboy today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

Big Sean: ‘I Stuck With My Gut’

“I made a promise to myself,” says the Detroit rapper. “I would never ever not follow my heart again. That way if I rise or fall, sink or swim, it’s by my own choice and my own decisions.”

» E-Mail This

Hip-Hop
ADULT ENTERTAINMENT NEWS UPDATE:Gabby Love’s top pick! Click and enjoy!

A Reminder You Might Need If You Feel Stuck (VIDEO)

Marisa, 22, who’s working as an escort and says she feels alienated from her family, wants to know: “Am I fixable and worth helping, or am I a lost cause?”

Dr. Phil responds, “I’m the incurable optimist. I just think that it’s never too late. I think you can always make a choice to turn things around. But I also am a realist. Life has momentum.” Watch more in the video above, and click here to see clips from this episode.

Like Dr. Phil | Follow Dr. Phil | Be on the Show

Dr. Phil – The Huffington Post

Kanye West’s New Song Will Be Stuck In Your Head ‘All Day’

Kanye West performed a new song called ‘All Day’ at the BRIT AWARDS on Wednesday.
News