Reaper Man: Discworld #11 (Unabridged) – Terry Pratchett

Terry Pratchett - Reaper Man: Discworld #11 (Unabridged)  artwork

Reaper Man: Discworld #11 (Unabridged)

Terry Pratchett

Genre: Sci Fi & Fantasy

Price: $ 19.95

Publish Date: December 16, 1999

© ℗ © 1999 ISIS Audio Books

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Fresh Air, Molly Ivins and Dana Gioa – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air, Molly Ivins and Dana Gioa  artwork

Fresh Air, Molly Ivins and Dana Gioa

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: October 7, 2003

© ℗ © 2003 WHYY-FM

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Flügel: Die Nomen-Trilogie 3 – Terry Pratchett

Terry Pratchett - Flügel: Die Nomen-Trilogie 3  artwork

Flügel: Die Nomen-Trilogie 3

Terry Pratchett

Genre: Sci Fi & Fantasy

Price: $ 6.95

Publish Date: November 9, 2011

© ℗ © 2011 SchallundWahn

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Terry Crews Implies Adam Venit’s LAPD Ties Got His Sexual Assault Case Tossed

Terry Crews isn’t done speaking out about his sexual assault case against WME talent agent Adam Venit … suggesting it was rejected by prosecutors for unscrupulous reasons. The “Brookline Nine-Nine” star shared his thoughts on Twitter Saturday,…

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Time Bandits – Terry Gilliam

Terry Gilliam - Time Bandits  artwork

Time Bandits

Terry Gilliam

Genre: Action & Adventure

Price: $ 9.99

Rental Price: $ 3.99

Release Date: November 6, 1981


In this fantastic voyage through time and space from Terry Gilliam, a boy named Kevin (Craig Warnock) escapes his gadget-obsessed parents to join a band of time-traveling dwarfs. Armed with a map stolen from the Supreme Being (Ralph Richardson), they plunder treasure from Napoleon (Ian Holm) and Agamemnon (Sean Connery)?but the Evil Genius (David Warner) is watching their every move. Featuring a darkly playful script by Gilliam and his Monty Python cohort Michael Palin (who also appears in the film), Time Bandits is at once a giddy fairy tale, a revisionist history lesson, and a satire of technology gone awry.

© © 1981 HANDMADE FILM PARTNERSHIP ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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Fresh Air, David Lynch and Isabella Rossellini – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air, David Lynch and Isabella Rossellini  artwork

Fresh Air, David Lynch and Isabella Rossellini

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: May 31, 2002

© ℗ © 2002 WHYY-FM

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Terry Crews responds to those who question his #MeToo story

Terry Crews has a simple response to those who question his #MeToo story.


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Terry Crews Takes High Road After 50 Cent Mocks His Sexual Assault Claim

[[tmz:video id=”0_4l9u0nit”]] Terry Crews is refusing to fire back at 50 Cent with insults after the rapper trolled his sexual assault case against a Hollywood agent — instead, he’s dropping facts. We got Terry in D.C. Tuesday and asked him…

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Terry Crews faced backlash for speaking up about his sexual assault

Actor Terry Crews called on men to speak more about sexual assault — both as victims and their roles perpetuating sexual violence — in order to lessen the stigma survivors face in American life.


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Fresh Air, Stephen Sondheim and Greg Kinnear – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air, Stephen Sondheim and Greg Kinnear  artwork

Fresh Air, Stephen Sondheim and Greg Kinnear

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: September 14, 2000

© ℗ © 2000 WHYY-FM

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The Skaar Invasion: The Fall of Shannara (Unabridged) – Terry Brooks

Terry Brooks - The Skaar Invasion: The Fall of Shannara (Unabridged)  artwork

The Skaar Invasion: The Fall of Shannara (Unabridged)

Terry Brooks

Genre: Sci Fi & Fantasy

Price: $ 26.95

Publish Date: June 19, 2018

© ℗ © 2018 Random House Audio

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Fresh Air, Elvis Costello and David Johansen – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air, Elvis Costello and David Johansen  artwork

Fresh Air, Elvis Costello and David Johansen

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: January 25, 2002

© ℗ © 2002 WHYY-FM

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When Danger Calls – Terry Odell

Terry Odell - When Danger Calls  artwork

When Danger Calls

Blackthorne, Inc., #1

Terry Odell

Genre: Suspense

Publish Date: May 21, 2013

Publisher: Terry Odell

Seller: Draft2Digital, LLC


If someone asks single mother Frankie Castor to clear a room, she’ll smile and find a vacuum cleaner.  Ryan Harper uses a gun.  Can they work together when their lives depend on it? Frankie’s returned to her childhood home in Montana to help care for her mother. Her biggest worries are balancing the budget and the upkeep of an aging home. When she offers a man a ride home from the hospital, she never imagines she’ll end up having to choose between her daughter’s life and matters of national security that could cost the lives of millions. Ryan returns to his family home to find a way to prove he didn’t leak vital information on a covert ops mission gone south. As he searches for the meaning of a file he’s kept hidden from the mission, he has no idea that international mercenaries have been searching for it—and him. When the mercenaries come after Ryan, he’s torn. Fighting for his country wars with fighting to rescue people he loves. Set against a Montana mountain backdrop, When Danger Calls is a story filled with action, adventure, and romance, where the stakes keep getting higher and higher.

iTunes Store: Top Free Books in Romance

Fresh Air, Jon Krakauer, Richard Turley, and Chiwetel Ejiofor (Nonfiction) – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air, Jon Krakauer, Richard Turley, and Chiwetel Ejiofor (Nonfiction)  artwork

Fresh Air, Jon Krakauer, Richard Turley, and Chiwetel Ejiofor (Nonfiction)

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: July 30, 2003

© ℗ © 2003 WHYY-FM

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Fresh Air, Wes Anderson and Robert Evans – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air, Wes Anderson and Robert Evans  artwork

Fresh Air, Wes Anderson and Robert Evans

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: July 26, 2002

© ℗ © 2002 WHYY-FM

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Fresh Air: Laughs (Nonfiction) – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air: Laughs (Nonfiction)  artwork

Fresh Air: Laughs (Nonfiction)

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 4.95

Publish Date: November 1, 2000

© ℗ © 2000 WHYY-FM

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Fresh Air, Triumph the Insult Comic Dog and Robert Freeman – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air, Triumph the Insult Comic Dog and Robert Freeman  artwork

Fresh Air, Triumph the Insult Comic Dog and Robert Freeman

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: November 20, 2003

© ℗ © 2003 WHYY-FM

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WIRED Autocomplete Interviews – Terry Crews Answers the Web’s Most Searched Questions

Terry Crews takes the WIRED Autocomplete Interview and answers the internet’s most searched questions about himself.

Catch Terry Crews as Bedlam this Friday, May 18th in Deadpool 2 and make sure to catch the season finale of “Brooklyn Nine-Nine” on Sunday, May 20th
WIRED Videos

Odd Goddesses – Darlene Olivia McElroy & Terry LaBelle Whitley

Darlene Olivia McElroy & Terry LaBelle Whitley - Odd Goddesses  artwork

Odd Goddesses

Darlene Olivia McElroy & Terry LaBelle Whitley

Genre: Art & Architecture

Publish Date: August 6, 2016

Publisher: Darlene Olivia McElroy

Seller: Darlene McElroy


Odd Goddesses is one in a series of goddess books showcasing the art, techniques and story behind the artwork of narrative artist, Darlene Olivia McElroy. Each piece of art has the story behind the piece, the techniques used in addition to several art techniques pages. Darlene, a Santa Fe based artist, has written five art technique books for NorthLight and given numerous classes and workshops here and abroad.

iTunes Store: Top Free Books in Arts & Entertainment

Spring Goddesses – Darlene Olivia McElroy & Terry LaBelle Whitley

Darlene Olivia McElroy & Terry LaBelle Whitley - Spring Goddesses  artwork

Spring Goddesses

Darlene Olivia McElroy & Terry LaBelle Whitley

Genre: Art & Architecture

Publish Date: August 6, 2016

Publisher: Darlene Olivia McElroy

Seller: Darlene McElroy


Spring Goddesses is one in a series of goddess books showcasing the art, techniques and story behind the artwork of narrative artist, Darlene Olivia McElroy. Each piece of art has the story behind the piece, the techniques used in addition to several art techniques pages. Darlene, a Santa Fe based artist, has written five art technique books for NorthLight and given numerous classes and workshops here and abroad.

iTunes Store: Top Free Books in Arts & Entertainment

Decluttr & Joel Terry Turn The Coachella Line-Up Into A Menu Of Flavors

2017 Coachella Valley Music And Arts Festival - Weekend 2 - Day 3

Source: Christopher Polk / Getty

Decluttr, a website and mobile application for selling your unwanted items, has teamed up with Joel Terry, a synaesthete, to break down what each artist performing of Coachella tastes like.
Joel has “lexical-gustatory synesthesia – a rare form of synesthesia where you can taste spoken or written word.” With his ability, he has determined what artists such as The Weeknd, SZA, Migos, Miguel, and more would taste like if their music turned into food or other edible items.

The Weeknd’s song “The Hills” was awarded the flavor of a chocolate chip cookie while Migos “Black & Boujeee” tasted like chocolate cake and a cheese puff with peanut butter on it. Beyonce’s “Drunk In Love” would supposedly translate into rusted iron and a large fragment of a burst rubber balloon.

This is an interesting talent and the combination of flavors is endless. For the full menu of flavors, check more about their redesigned line-up here.  See the lineups below and see how they line up with the actual Coachella lineup posters.

Coachella tickets are available now.

Decluttr Coachella Tastes Lineup

Source: Decluttr / Decluttr

Decluttr Coachella Tastes Lineup

Source: Decluttr / Decluttr

Photo: Getty

The Latest Hip-Hop News, Music and Media | Hip-Hop Wired

Everyday Goddesses – Darlene Olivia McElroy & Terry LaBelle Whitley

Darlene Olivia McElroy & Terry LaBelle Whitley - Everyday Goddesses  artwork

Everyday Goddesses

Darlene Olivia McElroy & Terry LaBelle Whitley

Genre: Art & Architecture

Publish Date: August 6, 2016

Publisher: Darlene Olivia McElroy

Seller: Darlene McElroy


Everyday Goddesses is one in a series of goddess books showcasing the art, techniques and story behind the artwork of narrative artist, Darlene Olivia McElroy. Each piece of art has the story behind the piece, the techniques used in addition to several art techniques pages. Darlene, a Santa Fe based artist, has written five art technique books for NorthLight and given numerous classes and workshops here and abroad. 

iTunes Store: Top Free Books in Arts & Entertainment

Accused Oscar Thief, Terry Bryant, Pleads Not Guilty

[[tmz:video id=”0_dy9a1xg0″]] The man accused of stealing Frances McDormand’s Oscar is looking way rougher around the edges than he did on Oscar night — he made his first court appearance Wednesday, pleading not guilty. Terry Bryant went from tux…

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Terry Crews’ Sexual Assault Case Against Agent Adam Venit Rejected

Terry CrewsTerry Crews’ sexual assault case against WME agent Adam Venit has hit a roadblock.
E! News can confirm the Los Angeles City Attorney and Los Angeles County D.A. have both rejected the…


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Adam Venit Says Terry Crews Wasn’t Injured and It Wasn’t Sexual

The man Terry Crews claims sexually assaulted him at a party has responded in new legal docs, saying it was all a case of no harm, no foul. Adam Venit, a big Hollywood agent at William Morris Endeavor, just filed his response to actor Terry’s…

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Death’s Mistress: The Nicci Chronicles, Book 1 (Unabridged) – Terry Goodkind

Terry Goodkind - Death's Mistress: The Nicci Chronicles, Book 1 (Unabridged)  artwork

Death’s Mistress: The Nicci Chronicles, Book 1 (Unabridged)

Terry Goodkind

Genre: Sci Fi & Fantasy

Price: $ 23.95

Publish Date: January 24, 2017

© ℗ © 2017 Brilliance Audio

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Faith of the Fallen: Sword of Truth, Book 6 (Unabridged) – Terry Goodkind

Terry Goodkind - Faith of the Fallen: Sword of Truth, Book 6 (Unabridged)  artwork

Faith of the Fallen: Sword of Truth, Book 6 (Unabridged)

Terry Goodkind

Genre: Sci Fi & Fantasy

Price: $ 21.95

Publish Date: May 13, 2008

© ℗ © 2008 Brilliance Audio

iTunes Store: Top Audiobooks in Sci Fi & Fantasy

Soul of the Fire: Sword of Truth, Book 5 (Unabridged) – Terry Goodkind

Terry Goodkind - Soul of the Fire: Sword of Truth, Book 5 (Unabridged)  artwork

Soul of the Fire: Sword of Truth, Book 5 (Unabridged)

Terry Goodkind

Genre: Sci Fi & Fantasy

Price: $ 19.95

Publish Date: May 13, 2008

© ℗ © 2008 Brilliance Audio

iTunes Store: Top Audiobooks in Sci Fi & Fantasy

Fresh Air, Mary Karr – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air, Mary Karr  artwork

Fresh Air, Mary Karr

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: February 1, 2002

© ℗ © 2002 WHYY-FM

iTunes Store: Top Audiobooks in Arts & Entertainment

Naked Empire: Sword of Truth, Book 8 (Unabridged) [Unabridged Fiction] – Terry Goodkind

Terry Goodkind - Naked Empire: Sword of Truth, Book 8 (Unabridged) [Unabridged  Fiction]  artwork

Naked Empire: Sword of Truth, Book 8 (Unabridged) [Unabridged Fiction]

Terry Goodkind

Genre: Sci Fi & Fantasy

Price: $ 29.95

Publish Date: May 13, 2008

© ℗ © 2008 Brilliance Audio

iTunes Store: Top Audiobooks in Sci Fi & Fantasy

Shroud of Eternity: Sister of Darkness: The Nicci Chronicles, Book 2 (Unabridged) – Terry Goodkind

Terry Goodkind - Shroud of Eternity: Sister of Darkness: The Nicci Chronicles, Book 2 (Unabridged)  artwork

Shroud of Eternity: Sister of Darkness: The Nicci Chronicles, Book 2 (Unabridged)

Terry Goodkind

Genre: Sci Fi & Fantasy

Price: $ 23.95

Publish Date: January 9, 2018

© ℗ © 2018 Brilliance Audio

iTunes Store: Top Audiobooks in Sci Fi & Fantasy

Blood of the Fold: Sword of Truth, Book 3 (Unabridged) [Unabridged Fiction] – Terry Goodkind

Terry Goodkind - Blood of the Fold: Sword of Truth, Book 3 (Unabridged) [Unabridged  Fiction]  artwork

Blood of the Fold: Sword of Truth, Book 3 (Unabridged) [Unabridged Fiction]

Terry Goodkind

Genre: Sci Fi & Fantasy

Price: $ 23.95

Publish Date: May 13, 2008

© ℗ © 2008 Brilliance Audio

iTunes Store: Top Audiobooks in Sci Fi & Fantasy

Love Goddesses – Darlene Olivia McElroy & Terry LaBelle Whitley

Darlene Olivia McElroy & Terry LaBelle Whitley - Love Goddesses  artwork

Love Goddesses

Darlene Olivia McElroy & Terry LaBelle Whitley

Genre: Art & Architecture

Publish Date: August 6, 2016

Publisher: Darlene Olivia McElroy

Seller: Darlene McElroy


Love Goddesses is one in a series of goddess books showcasing the art, techniques and story behind the artwork of narrative artist, Darlene Olivia McElroy. Each piece of art has the story behind the piece, the techniques used in addition to several art techniques pages. Darlene, a Santa Fe based artist, has written five art technique books for NorthLight and given numerous classes and workshops here and abroad. 

iTunes Store: Top Free Books in Arts & Entertainment

Fresh Air, Lee Kuan Yew and Stan Sesser – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air, Lee Kuan Yew and Stan Sesser  artwork

Fresh Air, Lee Kuan Yew and Stan Sesser

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: October 24, 2000

© ℗ © 2000 WHYY-FM

iTunes Store: Top Audiobooks in Arts & Entertainment

Terry Crews Reports Alleged Sexual Assault to Police

Terry CrewsTerry Crews has formally reported his alleged sexual assault to the Los Angeles Police Department, E! News confirms.
“LAPD can confirm Terry Crews meet with officers from the LAPD…


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Terry Crews Files Police Report Alleging Sexual Assault

Terry Crews just walked into an LAPD station and filed a report alleging sexual assault … TMZ has learned. Law enforcement sources tell TMZ … Crews went to cops nearly a month after posting on Twitter that a high-level Hollywood executive “came over…

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Unseen Academicals: Discworld #32 (Unabridged) – Terry Pratchett

Terry Pratchett - Unseen Academicals: Discworld #32 (Unabridged)  artwork

Unseen Academicals: Discworld #32 (Unabridged)

Terry Pratchett

Genre: Sci Fi & Fantasy

Price: $ 24.95

Publish Date: October 6, 2009

© ℗ © 2009 HarperAudio

iTunes Store: Top Audiobooks in Sci Fi & Fantasy

Confessor: Chainfire Trilogy, Part 3, Sword of Truth, Book 11 (Unabridged) [Unabridged Fiction] – Terry Goodkind

Terry Goodkind - Confessor: Chainfire Trilogy, Part 3, Sword of Truth, Book 11 (Unabridged) [Unabridged  Fiction]  artwork

Confessor: Chainfire Trilogy, Part 3, Sword of Truth, Book 11 (Unabridged) [Unabridged Fiction]

Terry Goodkind

Genre: Sci Fi & Fantasy

Price: $ 29.95

Publish Date: May 13, 2008

© ℗ © 2008 Brilliance Audio

iTunes Store: Top Audiobooks in Sci Fi & Fantasy

Writers Speak: A Collection of Interviews with Writers on Fresh Air with Terry Gross – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Writers Speak: A Collection of Interviews with Writers on Fresh Air with Terry Gross  artwork

Writers Speak: A Collection of Interviews with Writers on Fresh Air with Terry Gross

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 5.95

Publish Date: December 11, 2003

© ℗ © 2003 WHYY-FM

iTunes Store: Top Audiobooks in Arts & Entertainment

Terrahawks, Volume 2 – Andrew T. Smith, Jamie Anderson, Chris Dale, Geraldine Donaldson, David Hirsch & Terry Adlam

Andrew T. Smith, Jamie Anderson, Chris Dale, Geraldine Donaldson, David Hirsch & Terry Adlam - Terrahawks, Volume 2  artwork

Terrahawks, Volume 2

Andrew T. Smith, Jamie Anderson, Chris Dale, Geraldine Donaldson, David Hirsch & Terry Adlam

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 42.95

Publish Date: September 7, 2017

© ℗ © 2017 Big Finish Productions

iTunes Store: Top Audiobooks in Arts & Entertainment

Monty Python’s the Meaning of Life – Terry Jones & Terry Gilliam

Terry Jones & Terry Gilliam - Monty Python's the Meaning of Life  artwork

Monty Python’s the Meaning of Life

Terry Jones & Terry Gilliam

Genre: Comedy

Price: $ 4.99

Release Date: March 31, 1983


Those six pandemonium-mad Pythons are back with their craziest adventure ever! Graham Chapman, John Cleese, Terry Gilliam, Eric Idle, Terry Jones and Michael Palin have returned to explain The Meaning of Life. These naughty Brits offer the usual tasteful sketches involving favorite body parts and bodily functions, the wonders of war, the miracle of birth and a special preview of what's waiting for us in Heaven. Time pronounces it "an exhilarating experience!" Newsweek agrees, calling it, "the best movie from England's satirical sextet."

© © 1983 Celandine Films. All Rights Reserved.

iTunes Store: Top Movies in Comedy

Fresh Air, Fran Lebowitz and Anne Lamott (Nonfiction) – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air, Fran Lebowitz and Anne Lamott (Nonfiction)  artwork

Fresh Air, Fran Lebowitz and Anne Lamott (Nonfiction)

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: July 7, 2000

© ℗ © 2000 WHYY-FM

iTunes Store: Top Audiobooks in Arts & Entertainment

Freddie And Terry Fuck

We’ve got Freddie White and Terry Lawrence in the studio this week and these lads don’t need much prompting, they know just what to do!

Freddie is first to suck, but Terry is quick to wrap his lips around Freddie’s uncut cock–these two switch back and forth like they can’t decide who wants to suck or be sucked more. Of course, a wet sixty-nine solves that problem. 😉

"Do you want to fuck me’" is a simple question, but the answer from Terry is even more so, "yeah." Freddie gets on his knees on the edge of the bed so Terry can ease his dick up his ass. The two fuck like dogs before Terry prompts Freddie to get on top and ride him. Of course, like so many bottoms, it’s when he’s getting fucked on his back that Freddie’s ready to blow. Once he cums, Terry pulls out and follows suit, shooting cum all over Freddie’s dick and balls.

Watch the Full Length, High Quality Movie!

We’ve got Freddie White and Terry Lawrence in the studio this week and these lads don’t need much prompting, they know just what to do!

Stars: Terry Lawrence Freddie White

Categories: High Definition Safe Sex Anal Twink Gay

Scene Number: 1

Orientation: Gay

Studio Name: PornPlays Blake Mason

AEBN

Terry Crews Claims ‘High Level’ Hollywood Exec Sexually Assaulted Him

Terry Crews has come forward with a shocking claim amid the Harvey Weinstein scandal. Crews shared a series of candid tweets detailing an alleged incident in which a Hollywood executive sexually assaulted him. Find out why Crews is speaking out now.


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Terry Crews Recounts Sexual Assault By ‘Hollywood Honcho’

The actor claimed a Hollywood exec “groped [his] privates” at an event.
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The Sword of Shannara: The Shannara Series, Book 1 (Unabridged) – Terry Brooks

Terry Brooks - The Sword of Shannara: The Shannara Series, Book 1 (Unabridged)  artwork

The Sword of Shannara: The Shannara Series, Book 1 (Unabridged)

Terry Brooks

Genre: Sci Fi & Fantasy

Price: $ 41.95

Publish Date: March 18, 2004

© ℗ © 2004 Books on Tape

iTunes Store: Top Audiobooks in Sci Fi & Fantasy

‘AGT’s’ Terry Fator On Vegas Tragedy Recovery: ‘We’re Gonna Come Out Stronger & Better’

Las Vegas performer and “America’s Got Talent” Season 2 winner Terry Fator opens up to Access Hollywood’s Natalie Morales about where he was during the Vegas massacre. And, he shares his beliefs how the community will come together in the wake of the tragedy.


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Temple of the Winds: Sword of Truth, Book 4 (Unabridged) – Terry Goodkind

Terry Goodkind - Temple of the Winds: Sword of Truth, Book 4 (Unabridged)  artwork

Temple of the Winds: Sword of Truth, Book 4 (Unabridged)

Terry Goodkind

Genre: Sci Fi & Fantasy

Price: $ 23.95

Publish Date: May 13, 2008

© ℗ © 2008 Brilliance Audio

iTunes Store: Top Audiobooks in Sci Fi & Fantasy

Fresh Air, Amy Sedaris and Clifford Wright (Nonfiction) – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air, Amy Sedaris and Clifford Wright (Nonfiction)  artwork

Fresh Air, Amy Sedaris and Clifford Wright (Nonfiction)

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: May 25, 2000

© ℗ © 2000 WHYY-FM

iTunes Store: Top Audiobooks in Arts & Entertainment

The Adventures of Baron Munchausen – Terry Gilliam

Terry Gilliam - The Adventures of Baron Munchausen  artwork

The Adventures of Baron Munchausen

Terry Gilliam

Genre: Sci-Fi & Fantasy

Price: $ 7.99

Rental Price: $ 0.99

Release Date: March 8, 1989


Director Terry Gilliam (Brazil) and an all-star cast including John Neville, Eric Idle, Oliver Reed and Uma Thurman deliver this tale of the enchanting adventures of Baron von Munchausen on his journey to save a town from defeat. Being swallowed by a giant sea-monster, a trip to the moon, a dance with Venus and an escape from the Grim Reaper are only some of the improbable adventures.

© © 1989 Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

iTunes Store: Top Movies in Comedy

Fresh Air, David Sedaris and Alan Cumming (Nonfiction) – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air, David Sedaris and Alan Cumming (Nonfiction)  artwork

Fresh Air, David Sedaris and Alan Cumming (Nonfiction)

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: June 8, 2001

© ℗ © 2001 WHYY-FM

iTunes Store: Top Audiobooks in Arts & Entertainment

Phantom: Chainfire Trilogy, Part 2, Sword of Truth, Book 10 (Unabridged) [Unabridged Fiction] – Terry Goodkind

Terry Goodkind - Phantom: Chainfire Trilogy, Part 2, Sword of Truth, Book 10 (Unabridged) [Unabridged  Fiction]  artwork

Phantom: Chainfire Trilogy, Part 2, Sword of Truth, Book 10 (Unabridged) [Unabridged Fiction]

Terry Goodkind

Genre: Romance

Price: $ 29.95

Publish Date: May 13, 2008

© ℗ © 2008 Brilliance Audio

iTunes Store: Top Audiobooks in Romance

Fresh Air Archive, Ellen Degeneres and Andy Richter (Nonfiction) – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air Archive, Ellen Degeneres and Andy Richter (Nonfiction)  artwork

Fresh Air Archive, Ellen Degeneres and Andy Richter (Nonfiction)

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: May 23, 2003

© ℗ © 2003 WHYY-FM

iTunes Store: Top Audiobooks in Arts & Entertainment

Wizard’s First Rule: Sword of Truth, Book 1 (Unabridged) – Terry Goodkind

Terry Goodkind - Wizard's First Rule: Sword of Truth, Book 1 (Unabridged)  artwork

Wizard’s First Rule: Sword of Truth, Book 1 (Unabridged)

Terry Goodkind

Genre: Sci Fi & Fantasy

Price: $ 23.95

Publish Date: October 15, 2008

© ℗ © 2008 Brilliance Audio

iTunes Store: Top Audiobooks in Sci Fi & Fantasy

Stone of Tears: Sword of Truth, Book 2 (Unabridged) – Terry Goodkind

Terry Goodkind - Stone of Tears: Sword of Truth, Book 2 (Unabridged)  artwork

Stone of Tears: Sword of Truth, Book 2 (Unabridged)

Terry Goodkind

Genre: Sci Fi & Fantasy

Price: $ 26.95

Publish Date: May 13, 2008

© ℗ © 2008 Brilliance Audio

iTunes Store: Top Audiobooks in Sci Fi & Fantasy

Ascension – Terry Schott

Terry Schott - Ascension  artwork

Ascension

Terry Schott

Genre: Adventure

Publish Date: June 29, 2015

Publisher: Terry Schott

Seller: Terry Schott


In a world very much like our own 17th century, one man's kindness lifts a poor, homeless boy from the dirt and sets him on an unlikely path of adventure.  An average man would use a silver coin to buy food for a week.  An extraordinary boy can use that same coin to build an empire.

iTunes Store: Top Free Books in Sci-Fi & Fantasy

The Promise (2017) – Terry George

Terry George - The Promise (2017)  artwork

The Promise (2017)

Terry George

Genre: Drama

Price: $ 14.99

Release Date: April 21, 2017


Empires fall, love survives. When Michael (Oscar Isaac), a brilliant medical student, meets Ana (Charlotte Le Bon), their shared Armenian heritage sparks an attraction that explodes into a romantic rivalry between Michael and Ana’s boyfriend Chris (Christian Bale), a famous American photojournalist dedicated to exposing political truth. As the Ottoman Empire crumbles into war-torn chaos, their conflicting passions must be deferred while they join forces to get their people to safety and survive themselves. The Promise is directed by Academy Award winning filmmaker Terry George.

© © 2017 Open Road Films. All Rights Reserved.

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Good Omens: The BBC Radio 4 dramatisation – Neil Gaiman & Terry Pratchett

Neil Gaiman & Terry Pratchett - Good Omens: The BBC Radio 4 dramatisation  artwork

Good Omens: The BBC Radio 4 dramatisation

Neil Gaiman & Terry Pratchett

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 14.95

Publish Date: January 15, 2015

© ℗ © 2015 BBC Worldwide

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Fresh Air, Fran Lebowitz and Anne Lamott (Nonfiction) – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air, Fran Lebowitz and Anne Lamott (Nonfiction)  artwork

Fresh Air, Fran Lebowitz and Anne Lamott (Nonfiction)

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: July 7, 2000

© ℗ © 2000 WHYY-FM

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Warheart: Sword of Truth, Book 15 (Unabridged) – Terry Goodkind

Terry Goodkind - Warheart: Sword of Truth, Book 15 (Unabridged)  artwork

Warheart: Sword of Truth, Book 15 (Unabridged)

Terry Goodkind

Genre: Sci Fi & Fantasy

Price: $ 23.95

Publish Date: November 17, 2015

© ℗ © 2015 Brilliance Audio

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Good Omens: The BBC Radio 4 dramatisation (Unabridged) – Terry Pratchett & Neil Gaiman

Terry Pratchett & Neil Gaiman - Good Omens: The BBC Radio 4 dramatisation (Unabridged)  artwork

Good Omens: The BBC Radio 4 dramatisation (Unabridged)

Terry Pratchett & Neil Gaiman

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 11.95

Publish Date: January 15, 2015

© ℗ © 2015 BBC Worldwide

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Good Omens: The BBC Radio 4 dramatisation (Unabridged) – Terry Pratchett & Neil Gaiman

Terry Pratchett & Neil Gaiman - Good Omens: The BBC Radio 4 dramatisation (Unabridged)  artwork

Good Omens: The BBC Radio 4 dramatisation (Unabridged)

Terry Pratchett & Neil Gaiman

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 11.95

Publish Date: January 15, 2015

© ℗ © 2015 BBC Worldwide

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Fresh Air, Amy Sedaris and Clifford Wright (Nonfiction) – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air, Amy Sedaris and Clifford Wright (Nonfiction)  artwork

Fresh Air, Amy Sedaris and Clifford Wright (Nonfiction)

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: May 25, 2000

© ℗ © 2000 WHYY-FM

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Fresh Air Archive, Ellen Degeneres and Andy Richter (Nonfiction) – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air Archive, Ellen Degeneres and Andy Richter (Nonfiction)  artwork

Fresh Air Archive, Ellen Degeneres and Andy Richter (Nonfiction)

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: May 23, 2003

© ℗ © 2003 WHYY-FM

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Fresh Air Archive, Ellen Degeneres and Andy Richter (Nonfiction) – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air Archive, Ellen Degeneres and Andy Richter (Nonfiction)  artwork

Fresh Air Archive, Ellen Degeneres and Andy Richter (Nonfiction)

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: May 23, 2003

© ℗ © 2003 WHYY-FM

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Fresh Air Archive, Ellen Degeneres and Andy Richter (Nonfiction) – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air Archive, Ellen Degeneres and Andy Richter (Nonfiction)  artwork

Fresh Air Archive, Ellen Degeneres and Andy Richter (Nonfiction)

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: May 23, 2003

© ℗ © 2003 WHYY-FM

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Fresh Air, David Sedaris (Nonfiction) – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air, David Sedaris (Nonfiction)  artwork

Fresh Air, David Sedaris (Nonfiction)

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: June 1, 2000

© ℗ © 2000 WHYY-FM

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Fresh Air, Jodie Foster (Nonfiction) – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air, Jodie Foster (Nonfiction)  artwork

Fresh Air, Jodie Foster (Nonfiction)

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: June 17, 2002

© ℗ © 2002 WHYY-FM

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Fresh Air, Bill Maher (Nonfiction) – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air, Bill Maher (Nonfiction)  artwork

Fresh Air, Bill Maher (Nonfiction)

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: November 7, 2002

© ℗ © 2002 WHYY-FM

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Fresh Air, David Sedaris and Alan Cumming (Nonfiction) – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air, David Sedaris and Alan Cumming (Nonfiction)  artwork

Fresh Air, David Sedaris and Alan Cumming (Nonfiction)

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: June 8, 2001

© ℗ © 2001 WHYY-FM

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Brazil (1985) – Terry Gilliam

Terry Gilliam - Brazil (1985)  artwork

Brazil (1985)

Terry Gilliam

Genre: Comedy

Price: $ 7.99

Rental Price: $ 2.99

Release Date: December 13, 1985


Hailed for its groundbreaking visual effects and satirical story, Brazil is one of the most highly regarded films of all time and a bona fide cult classic. Jonathan Pryce stars as Sam Lowry, a grey-suited government clerk who finds his life turned upside-down when he gets involved in a case of mistaken identity. Categorized as an enemy of the state, Sam is propelled into a surreal romance with the woman of his dreams, who may also be a terrorist. Co-starring Robert De Niro and Michael Palin, director Terry Gilliam’s modern masterpiece is a pitch-black comedic look at a “perfect” future where technology reigns supreme.

© © 1985 Focus Features. All Rights Reserved.

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Fresh Air, Martin Scorsese and Paul Schrader – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air, Martin Scorsese and Paul Schrader  artwork

Fresh Air, Martin Scorsese and Paul Schrader

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: June 27, 2003

© ℗ © 2003 WHYY-FM

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Fresh Air, Colin Firth – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air, Colin Firth  artwork

Fresh Air, Colin Firth

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: November 14, 2003

© ℗ © 2003 WHYY-FM

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Fresh Air, Triumph the Insult Comic Dog and Robert Freeman – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air, Triumph the Insult Comic Dog and Robert Freeman  artwork

Fresh Air, Triumph the Insult Comic Dog and Robert Freeman

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: November 20, 2003

© ℗ © 2003 WHYY-FM

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Fresh Air, Keith Jarrett – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air, Keith Jarrett  artwork

Fresh Air, Keith Jarrett

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: February 27, 2001

© ℗ © 2001 WHYY-FM

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Fresh Air, John Cusack – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air, John Cusack  artwork

Fresh Air, John Cusack

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: July 20, 2001

© ℗ © 2001 WHYY-FM

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Fresh Air, Al Franken – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air, Al Franken  artwork

Fresh Air, Al Franken

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: September 3, 2003

© ℗ © 2003 WHYY-FM

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Fresh Air, Stephen King – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air, Stephen King  artwork

Fresh Air, Stephen King

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: November 21, 2003

© ℗ © 2003 WHYY-FM

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Fresh Air, Tom Waits – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air, Tom Waits  artwork

Fresh Air, Tom Waits

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: November 22, 2002

© ℗ © 2002 WHYY-FM

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Fresh Air Archive: Paul Simon – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air Archive: Paul Simon  artwork

Fresh Air Archive: Paul Simon

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: December 31, 2002

© ℗ © 2002 WHYY-FM

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Fear and Loathing In Las Vegas – Terry Gilliam

Terry Gilliam - Fear and Loathing In Las Vegas  artwork

Fear and Loathing In Las Vegas

Terry Gilliam

Genre: Comedy

Price: $ 9.99

Rental Price: $ 2.99

Release Date: January 1, 1998


When a writing assignment lands journalist Raoul Duke (Johnny Depp) and sidekick Dr. Gonzo (Benicio Del Toro) in Las Vegas, they decide to make it the ultimate business trip. But before long, business is forgotten and trip has become the key word. Fueled by a suitcase full of mind-bending pharmaceuticals, Duke and Gonzo set off on a fast and furious ride through nonstop neon, surreal surroundings and a crew of the craziest characters ever (including cameo appearances by Cameron Diaz, Christina Ricci, Gary Busey and many others). But no matter where misadventure leads them, Duke and Gonzo discover that sometimes going too far is the only way to go.

© © 1998 Universal City Studios Productions, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

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Fresh Air, Elvis Costello and David Johansen – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air, Elvis Costello and David Johansen  artwork

Fresh Air, Elvis Costello and David Johansen

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: January 25, 2002

© ℗ © 2002 WHYY-FM

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Fresh Air, David Rakoff – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air, David Rakoff  artwork

Fresh Air, David Rakoff

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: August 9, 2002

© ℗ © 2002 WHYY-FM

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Fresh Air, Stephen Sondheim and Greg Kinnear – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air, Stephen Sondheim and Greg Kinnear  artwork

Fresh Air, Stephen Sondheim and Greg Kinnear

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: September 14, 2000

© ℗ © 2000 WHYY-FM

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Fresh Air, Wes Anderson and Robert Evans – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air, Wes Anderson and Robert Evans  artwork

Fresh Air, Wes Anderson and Robert Evans

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: July 26, 2002

© ℗ © 2002 WHYY-FM

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Fresh Air, Matt Damon – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air, Matt Damon  artwork

Fresh Air, Matt Damon

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: June 19, 2002

© ℗ © 2002 WHYY-FM

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Fresh Air, Jack Black – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air, Jack Black  artwork

Fresh Air, Jack Black

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: October 8, 2003

© ℗ © 2003 WHYY-FM

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Shaman, Healer, Heretic – M. Terry Green

M. Terry Green - Shaman, Healer, Heretic  artwork

Shaman, Healer, Heretic

An Olivia Lawson, Techno-Shaman Novel

M. Terry Green

Genre: Contemporary

Publish Date: January 27, 2011

Publisher: M. Terry Green

Seller: Middleworld Productions


Even for a techno-shaman, a kachina in the bedroom isn’t exactly part of the drill. When Olivia Lawson wakes to find one towering over her, she panics. A Hopi god visiting the real world isn't just wrong–it's impossible. Or is it? Soon Olivia learns that the kachina is the least of her worries. As she struggles to save her clients, clashes with other shamans, and fends off the attacks of real-world vigilantes, Olivia finds herself in the destructive path of a malevolent ancient force intent on leaving the spiritual realm to conquer this one. Left with few options, Olivia is forced to defy centuries of shaman prohibitions. As she and her allies risk everything in their bid for survival, Olivia ultimately learns that the rules are there for a reason and that breaking them has a terrible cost.

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Fresh Air, Garrison Keillor – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air, Garrison Keillor  artwork

Fresh Air, Garrison Keillor

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: July 24, 2002

© ℗ © 2002 WHYY-FM

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Fresh Air, Aimee Mann – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air, Aimee Mann  artwork

Fresh Air, Aimee Mann

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: June 13, 2000

© ℗ © 2000 WHYY-FM

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Fresh Air, David Lynch and Isabella Rossellini – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air, David Lynch and Isabella Rossellini  artwork

Fresh Air, David Lynch and Isabella Rossellini

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: May 31, 2002

© ℗ © 2002 WHYY-FM

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Fresh Air, Paul McCartney – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air, Paul McCartney  artwork

Fresh Air, Paul McCartney

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 1.95

Publish Date: January 18, 2002

© ℗ © 2002 WHYY-FM

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The Sword of Shannara (Abridged Fiction) – Terry Brooks

Terry Brooks - The Sword of Shannara (Abridged Fiction)  artwork

The Sword of Shannara (Abridged Fiction)

Terry Brooks

Genre: Sci Fi & Fantasy

Price: $ 10.95

Publish Date: December 16, 1999

© ℗ © 1999 Phoenix Books

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The Sword of Shannara: The Shannara Series, Book 1 (Unabridged) – Terry Brooks

Terry Brooks - The Sword of Shannara: The Shannara Series, Book 1 (Unabridged)  artwork

The Sword of Shannara: The Shannara Series, Book 1 (Unabridged)

Terry Brooks

Genre: Sci Fi & Fantasy

Price: $ 41.95

Publish Date: August 1, 2003

© ℗ © 2003 Books on Tape

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Hotel Rwanda – Terry George

Terry George - Hotel Rwanda  artwork

Hotel Rwanda

Terry George

Genre: Drama

Price: $ 9.99

Rental Price: $ 2.99

Release Date: December 22, 2004


Hotel Rwanda tells the inspiring story of real-life hero Paul Rusesabagina (Don Cheadle), a hotel manager in Rwanda who used his courage and cunning to shelter over a thousand refugees from certain death. While the rest of the world closed its eyes, Paul opened his heart and proved that one good man can make a difference.

© © KIGALI RELEASING LIMITED

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Equal Rites: Discworld #3 (Unabridged) – Terry Pratchett

Terry Pratchett - Equal Rites: Discworld #3 (Unabridged)  artwork

Equal Rites: Discworld #3 (Unabridged)

Terry Pratchett

Genre: Sci Fi & Fantasy

Price: $ 19.95

Publish Date: January 1, 1987

© ℗ © 1987 ISIS Audio Books

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Mort: Discworld #4 (Unabridged) – Terry Pratchett

Terry Pratchett - Mort: Discworld #4 (Unabridged)  artwork

Mort: Discworld #4 (Unabridged)

Terry Pratchett

Genre: Sci Fi & Fantasy

Price: $ 19.95

Publish Date: January 1, 1987

© ℗ © 1987 ISIS Audio Books

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Severed Souls: Sword of Truth, Book 14 (Unabridged) – Terry Goodkind

Terry Goodkind - Severed Souls: Sword of Truth, Book 14 (Unabridged)  artwork

Severed Souls: Sword of Truth, Book 14 (Unabridged)

Terry Goodkind

Genre: Sci Fi & Fantasy

Price: $ 23.95

Publish Date: August 5, 2014

© ℗ © 2014 Brilliance Audio

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The Omen Machine: A Richard and Kahlan Novel (Unabridged) – Terry Goodkind

Terry Goodkind - The Omen Machine: A Richard and Kahlan Novel (Unabridged)  artwork

The Omen Machine: A Richard and Kahlan Novel (Unabridged)

Terry Goodkind

Genre: Sci Fi & Fantasy

Price: $ 23.95

Publish Date: August 16, 2011

© ℗ © 2011 Brilliance Audio

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T. Riley: In C – Terry Riley & Members of the Creative & Performing Arts at SUNY-Buffalo

Terry Riley & Members of the Creative & Performing Arts at SUNY-Buffalo - T. Riley: In C  artwork

T. Riley: In C

Terry Riley & Members of the Creative & Performing Arts at SUNY-Buffalo

Genre: Classical

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: March 24, 2009

© ℗ Originally released 1968 Sony Music Entertainment / (P) 2009 Sony Music Entertainment

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Africa Express Presents… Terry Riley’s In C Mali – Andre de Ridder & Africa Express

Andre de Ridder & Africa Express - Africa Express Presents... Terry Riley's In C Mali  artwork

Africa Express Presents… Terry Riley’s In C Mali

Andre de Ridder & Africa Express

Genre: Classical

Price: $ 9.99

Release Date: November 24, 2014

© ℗ 2014 Africa Express under exclusive license to Transgressive Records Ltd.

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The Zero Theorem – Terry Gilliam

Terry Gilliam -  The Zero Theorem  artwork

The Zero Theorem

Terry Gilliam

Genre: Sci-Fi & Fantasy

Price: $ 9.99

Rental Price: $ 3.99

Release Date: September 19, 2014


In a fractured vision of our not so distant future, a computer genius (Academy Award Winner Christoph Waltz, Django Unchained) is given a seemingly impossible mission by his employer, a shadowy, all-powerful corporation. As he obsessively pursues his task, distracted and slowed down at every turn, he may unlock the very secret of human existence. Featuring an all-star cast and directed by visionary filmmaker Terry Gilliam (12 Monkeys, Brazil).

© © 2013 Asia and Europe Productions S.A.

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Stone of Tears: Sword of Truth, Book 2 (Unabridged) [Unabridged Fiction] – Terry Goodkind

Terry Goodkind - Stone of Tears: Sword of Truth, Book 2 (Unabridged) [Unabridged  Fiction]  artwork

Stone of Tears: Sword of Truth, Book 2 (Unabridged) [Unabridged Fiction]

Terry Goodkind

Genre: Sci Fi & Fantasy

Price: $ 26.95

Publish Date: May 13, 2008

© ℗ © 2008 Brilliance Audio

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Fresh Air: Laughs – Terry Gross

Terry Gross - Fresh Air: Laughs  artwork

Fresh Air: Laughs

Terry Gross

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 4.95

Publish Date: November 1, 2000

© ℗ © 2000 WHYY-FM

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Blood of the Fold: Sword of Truth, Book 3 (Unabridged) [Unabridged Fiction] – Terry Goodkind

Terry Goodkind - Blood of the Fold: Sword of Truth, Book 3 (Unabridged) [Unabridged  Fiction]  artwork

Blood of the Fold: Sword of Truth, Book 3 (Unabridged) [Unabridged Fiction]

Terry Goodkind

Genre: Sci Fi & Fantasy

Price: $ 23.95

Publish Date: May 13, 2008

© ℗ © 2008 Brilliance Audio

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Looney Tunes (1994-) #78 – David Weiss, Frank Strom, Mike DeCarlo, Terry Collins, Dave Alvarez, Howard Simpson & John Constanza

David Weiss, Frank Strom, Mike DeCarlo, Terry Collins, Dave Alvarez, Howard Simpson & John Constanza - Looney Tunes (1994-) #78  artwork

Looney Tunes (1994-) #78

David Weiss, Frank Strom, Mike DeCarlo, Terry Collins, Dave Alvarez, Howard Simpson & John Constanza

Genre: Graphic Novels

Publish Date: November 26, 2014

Publisher: DC Comics

Seller: DC Comics


A classic Looney rivalry hits prime time as Elmer hosts a TV fix-it show and Bugs throws a monkey wrench into the mix! Plus, Daffy and Porky become superspies, and Sylvester is forced to guard Tweety with his life!

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Mike Tyson In Skin-Tight Leather Pants Takes On Terry Crews In ‘Lip Sync Battle’

Mike Tyson wore what just might be the tightest pair of pants ever for his appearance on Thursday night’s “Lip Sync Battle” on Spike.

Tyson, who performed Salt-N-Pepa’s “Push It,” was facing off against Terry Crews, who delivered an unforgettable version of Vanessa Carlton’s “A Thousand Miles.”

But when it was all over, no one was talking about the music or the syncing. It was all about Tyson’s skin-tight leather pants.

“I feel sexy,” Tyson said after the performance.

“Please don’t feel too sexy right now,” host LL Cool J replied.

But Tyson confessed that he was more worried about another potential problem that could erupt in those pants.

“I’m scared to pass flatulence,” he said. “If I pass gas, man, there’ll be an explosion.”

Watch the clip above.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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Terry Crews Serenading Betty White With ‘The Golden Girls’ Theme Song Will Make You All Kinds Of Happy

Well, this is just precious.

At the 2015 TV Land Awards, which airs Saturday, host Terry Crews got down on one knee and serenaded actress Betty White with a spot-on lip-sync of “The Golden Girls” theme song.

It was TV nostalgia at its very best.

terry-crews-betty-white

The “Brooklyn Nine-Nine” actor’s performance was part of the award show’s opening number — a lip-synced medley of iconic TV theme songs from shows like “The Addams Family” and “Friends.”

Watch the medley above, and catch the whole award show at 9 p.m. ET.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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Good Omens: The BBC Radio 4 dramitisation (Unabridged) – Terry Pratchett & Neil Gaiman

Terry Pratchett & Neil Gaiman - Good Omens: The BBC Radio 4 dramitisation (Unabridged)  artwork

Good Omens: The BBC Radio 4 dramitisation (Unabridged)

Terry Pratchett & Neil Gaiman

Genre: Arts & Entertainment

Price: $ 14.95

Publish Date: January 15, 2015

© ℗ © 2015 BBC Worldwide

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Good Omens (Unabridged) – Terry Pratchett & Neil Gaiman

Terry Pratchett & Neil Gaiman - Good Omens (Unabridged)  artwork

Good Omens (Unabridged)

Terry Pratchett & Neil Gaiman

Genre: Sci Fi & Fantasy

Price: $ 28.95

Publish Date: November 10, 2009

© ℗ © 2009 HarperAudio

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Wizard’s First Rule: Sword of Truth, Book 1 (Unabridged Fiction) – Terry Goodkind

Terry Goodkind - Wizard's First Rule: Sword of Truth, Book 1 (Unabridged  Fiction)  artwork

Wizard’s First Rule: Sword of Truth, Book 1 (Unabridged Fiction)

Terry Goodkind

Genre: Sci Fi & Fantasy

Price: $ 23.95

Publish Date: October 15, 2008

© ℗ © 2008 Brilliance Audio

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Bad Santa (Director’s Cut) – Terry Zwigoff

Terry Zwigoff - Bad Santa (Director's Cut)  artwork

Bad Santa (Director’s Cut)

Terry Zwigoff

Genre: Comedy

Price: $ 4.99

Release Date: October 10, 2006


The “baddest” Santa ever comes to town with the hilarious Billy Bob Thornton, Bernie Mac, and John Ritter! Ill-mannered store Santa Willie Soke (Thornton) is really a safecracker with a holiday tradition of making one big score every Christmas Eve with his clever Elf-partner-in-crime Marcus. But this year's heist-fest could be completely foiled by a snoopy store manager (Ritter), savvy mall detective (Mac), sexy Santa fan, and an innocent 8 year old misfit who thinks the intoxicated and felonious Willie is the real Santa he seeks.

© © 2003 Miramax.

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The Game – Terry Schott

Terry Schott - The Game  artwork

The Game

Terry Schott

Genre: Adventure

Publish Date: August 22, 2013

Publisher: Terry Schott

Seller: Smashwords


The Matrix/ Ender's Game meets The Hunger Games … What if, instead of traditional schools, children learned by participating in a virtual reality simulation, one that allowed them to experience, "life" from birth to death – multiple times? What if one player, on his final play, could change the world forever…?

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Playboy Will Release A Whole Issue Shot By Terry Richardson

Terry Richardson, the prominent photographer who has been accused of sexual harassment by several models, will shoot an entire issue of Playboy, which is set to come out in early 2015.

Richardson previewed some NSFW images from the issue, titled “California Dreamin,'” on his blog Friday.

A Playboy spokeswoman told Jezebel that “Yes, Terry has shot for the magazine many times over the years, and has been a great partner.” As the website notes, not everyone is so eager to embrace Richardson these days; the shoe company Aldo parted ways with him in June as the chorus of complaints grew louder.

Richardson recently defended himself as part of a feature story in New York Magazine that drew plenty of criticism.
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Playboy Will Release A Whole Issue Shot By Terry Richardson

Terry Richardson, the prominent photographer who has been accused of sexual harassment by several models, will shoot an entire issue of Playboy, which is set to come out in early 2015.

Richardson previewed some NSFW images from the issue, titled “California Dreamin,'” on his blog Friday.

A Playboy spokeswoman told Jezebel that “Yes, Terry has shot for the magazine many times over the years, and has been a great partner.” As the website notes, not everyone is so eager to embrace Richardson these days; the shoe company Aldo parted ways with him in June as the chorus of complaints grew louder.

Richardson recently defended himself as part of a feature story in New York Magazine that drew plenty of criticism.
Style – The Huffington Post
FASHION NEWS UPDATE-Visit Shoe Deals Online today for the hottest deals online for shoes!

A Drum God, Juno Jammers & Superheroes: Conversations with Terry Bozzio, July Talk and Magic Man

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photo credit: André Ozga

A Conversation with Terry Bozzio

Mike Ragogna: Terry, when did your devotion to percussion and drums begin and who are some of your early musical heroes?

Terry Bozzio: Surf Drum Music, Sandy Nelson etc., then The Beatles on Ed Sullivan made me beg my father for drum lessons. I’m celebrating the anniversary of 50 years since that first lesson on July 15, 2014. Then the San Francisco music scene exploded and local bands like Big Brother with Janis Joplin could be seen down the road for $ 2.50. Jimi Hendrix and Cream came next. Then I went to college and got into studying the great jazz drummers who played with Miles or Coltrane and classical music.

MR: What was playing with Frank Zappa like and how did he influence you? What are your favorite recordings with him?

TB: I was very much in awe of Franks’s multiple talents and intellectual prowess. I learned so much from him in 3 years! It was like Marine Boot Camp for musicians.
He took me from being a naive drummer from San Francisco to being known all over the world with credibility, just because I was affiliated with him. Favorite recording would have to be “The Ocean is the Ultimate Solution” because it was an improvisation with him.

MR: You also played in UK and with Jeff Beck. What are your reflections of those years?

TB: Ah, the English! Well, Beck, of course, is just the best guitarist and one of the nicest people I have worked with. Thanks to him and keyboardist/composer Tony Hymas we made Guitar Shop, won a Grammy and toured the world several times. Playing with Jeff is like lighting a fire. And I loved to try to light him on fire! The UK was a great experience for me as well, I was a sideman member, enjoyed the music and tried to play my ass off back then.

MR: How did your group Missing Persons come about and did you leave for creative or personal reasons or…?

TB: It was a concept that developed between Warren, my ex [Dale Bozzio] and myself. I was frustrated by being a sideman in UK and wanted to do something more unique and modern. Warren left Frank Zappa and I left UK. We hooked up with the legendary Ken Scott, and Zappa let us use his studio to cut the demo EP (that got picked up and later sold something close to 400K, which for a time was the best selling EP in history). The idea was to be as creative as possible w/great players and intricate music but in the “pop” universe. We wanted it to be like a Fellini movie, and it was on many levels, including the tragic parts!

MR: Do you have a spiritual connection when playing drums and percussion?

TB: Absolutely. It’s really very much a “whole psyche” experience. I describe it as a “borderline” state of using all that you know and are, consciously: Intellectually, emotionally, physically and intuitively. But dipping into the unconscious and letting things happen or come through you that you were not aware of or planning. That’s the spiritual moment where things better that you could conceive happen. At that moment you use everything you know about music and compositional technique to develop, repeat, enhance or contrast with this sort of “gift idea” you have been graced with. When you are in this “zone,” it is an awesome experience.

MR: Any particular moments of your career overall that you’re the most proud of?

TB: My bio is loaded with them, Zappa once called me a genius! That was nice! But, I’m hoping this upcoming tour will be that. My big kit has midi to enhance the melodies I play. There are a lot of contrasting pieces I’ll be playing that take from, classical, ethnic percussion styles from all over the world, ambient, spacey, film score like compositions, as well as my art work as a stage set. I hope to take my audience on a time traveling experience with me!

MR: You also recorded instructional videos, performed at drum clinics, etc. How do you feel about being in the role of teacher or mentor?

TB: You can’t keep it unless you give it away! When not touring I work at DrumChannel.com hosting shows where I get to interview the best drummers in the world and play with them! And I have a full Art of Drumming lesson series you could study from. It covers all the elements of music: rhythm, melody, harmony, dynamics and orchestration as applied to the drum set in video and downloadable PDF files of exercises. I feel responsible to study and use the correct language of music–from the Western European tradition–when I speak and teach. I then try to share my concepts. A concept can be universal and students can apply them in infinite ways according to their own expression and affinities.

MR: What advice do you have for new artists?

TB: Study, learn the history, learn the basics. Try to be consistent and enjoy the process. Look inside, be authentic and honest with yourself, others and your art.

MR: And what would you have told Terry Bozzio when he was first starting out?

TB: Probably the same thing…but I wouldn’t have listened!! Youth is wasted on youth.

MR: Where do you see your place in music as a player and patron saint of the ostinato?

TB: I don’t see myself that way at all! An ostinato is just another of many musical/compositional devices. Most music falls into the homophonic category, that is, sound with sound, harmonic or rhythmic accompaniment with a lead melody or rhythm line. The accompaniment is always subordinate to the lead line. Much the same way as a pianist plays a bass line or chords with his left hand while playing the lead melody with his right. This technique has been around for hundreds of years–i.e. Mozart’s use of the “Alberti bass line”–and is not my invention. The drum set was only invented about 1899 when a drummer rigged up a way to play bass drum with his foot while playing snare drum with his hands. We’ve been expanding and developing techniques and technology to this day. It’s what we do! What we love! I love to compose, paint, practice new things, invent new equipment, make my drums look like an abstract (but functional) sculpture! Nobody pays me to do those things! It’s what I feel compelled to do. But I also love to share what I’ve discovered with others. That’s where my love of performance comes in. And most importantly the magic of live music. There is nothing to compare it too… CD’s, DVD’s of say Stravinsky’s “Rite of Spring” are great, but when you hear it played by great musicians in a symphony hall it becomes transcendent!

Think about it. Music is a ritual or reenactment of a myth. A theater is a “church” for music. The listener gives himself over to the experience without the distractions of the outside normal world. The artist is a channel or medium for the very spirit of creativity. He is high up on stage, the listener low. He is in the light, the listener is in the dark. He performs through an amplified sound system while the listener is silent. If the artist does his job correctly, both share in a transcendent experience where one is lifted above our normal mundane state of consciousness into a place where time and space no longer have such a hold on us. We are transformed, if only for a moment, into a place where feelings of awe, joy and ecstasy exist. Science explains this as entrainment, because everything in the universe is rhythm–frequency and vibration. From the rotations of planets to tempo, into the hearing range of pitch, to color–trillions of vibrations per second–to radio waves, x-rays and beyond, all are related by the law of the octave. So music is indeed a metaphor for the universe!

An Evening with Terry Bozzio North American Tour Dates:

Aug 14, 2014 – Ramona, CA – Ramona Mainstage
Aug 15, 2014 – Mexicali, BC, Mexico – Lob Bar (Bol Bol)
Aug 17, 2014 – Phoenix, AZ – MIM Music Theater
Aug 19, 2014 – Las Vegas, NV – Sam Ash
Aug 23, 2014 – Denver, CO – Soiled Dove
Aug 26, 2014 – Tulsa, OK – The Vanguard
Aug 28, 2014 – Conroe, TX – Dosey Doe
Aug 29, 2014 – Fort Worth, TX – McDavid Studio
Aug 31, 2014 – Austin, TX – One World Theater
Sept 04, 2014 – Orlando, FL – Plaza Live
Sept 05, 2014 – Largo, FL – Largo Cultural Center
Sept 08, 2014 – Charlotte, NC – The Neighborhood Theater
Sept 10, 2014 – Washington, DC – The Hamilton
Sept 11, 2014 – Wilmington, DE – World Café
Sept 13, 2014 – Asbury Park, NJ – The Saint
Sept 14, 2014 – New York City, NY – Iridium (2 shows – 8pm & 10pm)
Sept 15, 2014 – New York City, NY – Iridium (2 shows – 8pm & 10pm)
Sept 16, 2014 – Stafford Springs, CT – Stafford Palace Theater
Sept 17, 2014 – Woodstock, NY – Bearsville Theater
Sept 19, 2014 – Richmond Hill, ON, Canada – Cosmopolitan Music Hall
Sept 21, 2014 – Buffalo, NY – Nietzches
Sept 22, 2014 – Cleveland, OH – Nighttown
Sept 24, 2014 – Nashville, TN – 3rd and Lindsley
Sept 26, 2014 – Newport, KY – The Southgate House Revival
Sept 30, 2014 – Little Rock, AR – Juanitas
Oct 05, 2014 – Chicago, IL – Martyrs
Oct 06, 2014 – Chicago, IL – Martyrs
Oct 10, 2014 – Winnipeg, MB, Canada – West End Cultural Centre
Oct 14, 2014 – Calgary, AB, Canada – Orpheus Theatre
Oct 17, 2014 – Vancouver Island, BC, Canada – Tidemark Theatre
Oct 18, 2014 – Vancouver, BC, Canada – Rio Theatre
Oct 19, 2014 – Seattle, WA – The Triple Door
Oct 20, 2014 – Portland, OR – Aladdin Theater
Oct 23, 2014 – Oakland, CA – Yoshi´s
Oct 25, 2014 – Los Angeles, CA – Catalina´s
Oct 26, 2014 – Los Angeles, CA – Catalina´s

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photo courtesy Sneak Attack Media

A Conversation with July Talk’s

Mike Ragogna: I’m sure you’ve been asked this a billion times, so here comes a billion and one. What is the history of the name “July Talk”?

Peter Dreimanis: Essentially, the first song that was written for the band was called “July Talk” and we ended up switching and using it as the band name because it seemed so fitting. The whole band is based around conversation, every song is kind of a back and forth between Leah and I. The month of July seemed prevalent because as a young person you can start a summer, you can party your face off, you can fall in love, you can have these incredible high highs and low lows and then the fall can come and everything gets swept under the rug. We wanted to have a conversation that was stuck within that naïveté, I guess, that lost summer. That kind of felt fitting for the band’s name because of the dramatic live show we try to put as such a priority.

MR: You guys are based in Toronto, right?

Leah Fay: Correct!

MR: What’s the history of the band?

LF: Peter and I met in a bar.

MR: A lot of great stories start with that line.

LF: [laughs] We dug the way our voices sounded so we started getting together and playing some tunes and it quickly became very obvious that this project needed to be a full-on five piece rock ‘n’ roll band, so Danny Miles on drums, Josh Warburton on bass, and Ian Docherty on guitar all came into the picture. Basically, we toured the sh*t out of Canada and now we’ve kind of slowly been introducing ourselves to the rest of the world.

MR: Josh, you’ve directed the band’s videos, which are all in black and white. Usually, that approach is used for a retro or noir effect. What was your intention?

Josh Warburton: The video is just an extension of an aesthetic that Peter had early on. We approached everything in this black and white visual that helps illustrate the ying and the yang, the black and white of the conversation between he and Leah. Obviously, as a filmmaker when you’re told you can only make something in black and white you’re thrilled because normally people don’t want to see black and white or don’t want to commission black and white work. For us it became this opportunity to have a wonderful aesthetic and from there build in some period elements while still keeping the project rounded and contemporary. It’s just a great place to start from and the band is really fun to film, there’s always great energy, so it seems to be the perfect fit.

PD: It’s just as important that we have fun creating the visuals for the band as we do creating the record. I think as the project develops they become so interwoven you get lost. When we’re writing a song it won’t be five minutes into finding that hook that we’re already thinking of what the visual side could be, so moving forward we’re really looking forward to working our asses off and trying to create something really cohesive.

MR: What’s the music making process like?

LF: July Talk kind of only lives on stage. When we first released our first album in Canada, we’d played maybe four shows or something like that, so the ten songs came out and we quickly realized how much they were changing and how much we were learning about what this project really is. It’s kind of a chaotic rock ‘n’ roll experiment based on a conversation, so the way we write is trying to capture that kind of energy and write with an audience in mind. The way we’ve figured out how to do that best for us currently is locking ourselves in a cabin or a house and working sixteen to eighteen hour days waking up in the morning and writing. It can be complicated to collaborate but at the end of the day five minds are better than one.

MR: Peter, how do you feel about your voice being compared to Tom Waits?

PD: [laughs] It’s an inevitable thing when you sing in that register, to be compared to people that do. I’ve always lived by the idea that as an artist if you’re not exercising the part of you that makes you the most unique you might not be getting at the epicenter of what you can put into the world. It’s important to me that I experiment with that. As soon as I became old enough as a teenager to start making these sounds that I thought only old men could make, it opened up a world of opportunity. All these songs that you start playing and start writing suddenly mean something completely different when they come out of your gut, or out of this part of you that you didn’t even know really existed. Writing with Leah, it’s an entirely incredible project. We always joke that if we ever had another band where it was just one of us songwriting would be kind of boring. It’s so addictive to create these two sides to every issue and use the difference in our voices to illustrate that conflict. It’s quite addicting, and my voice doesn’t seem to be going anywhere, it’s only getting lower. Hopefully, we can keep doing it.

MR: Do you think that might be from life on the road?

PD: Uh, yeah, you hit the nail on the head.

MR: And Leah, you’re a soprano. Did you have any training?

LF: Not really. The first time I started singing was because I very briefly wanted to have a career as a musical theater actress. I spent my whole life dancing and doing art and then eventually studying performance art, but when I was trying to figure out what it was I wanted to do I was like, “I just want to be a triple threat!” Unfortunately, I didn’t really have any faith in my voice, but you have your heart broken and then you need to start writing songs about it. I started singing out of necessity, not so much because I thought I had a good voice.

MR: Where do the topics you write about come from?

PD: They kind of come out of nowhere. We could be driving in a van and something comes up. What’s changed over the last year of writing for the band is that we’re a bit more on the same team. It used to be that Leah would write what she’s says and I would write what I’m saying and we would hope there’s enough butting of heads in the process that there would be conflict in the art. But I think as time went on, we started doing it more like how the band makes music, which is a heavily accountable editing process where every little part. Every little word has to be proven to each other and we have to make sure that we’re headed in the right direction. The topics we write about lately is kind of what it’s like to be a man or a woman at our age and try to be brave and say things that everybody knows, but people are a little afraid to say; acknowledge the unacknowledged. I think that inherently when you put a man and a woman on stage, you could be singing “Born To Run” and it would mean something totally different from when Bruce Springsteen sings it. People are going to attach gender identity to anything so we thought, “Why not explore those topics and really try to take an opportunity that’s fallen in our lap?” I think that’s the direction that we like to write in, to examine those ideas.

MR: Your latest single and EP title is Guns + Ammunition. Its subject matter seems pretty universal yet complex.

PD: Yeah. We’re really obsessed with these two opposite sides and “Guns + Ammunition” seemed like a perfect metaphor for codependence. Neither of them is anything without the other. Thinking of that when it comes to being in love and being damaged felt right. I think that as we go through these writing processes, we get excited because we push each other and make sure that we’re really getting to the essence of something. The only reason it really is rewarding is because when you write the songs that really do get to the essence of that conflict. When you play it live, it’s different every night and there’s a fight that starts. Each song is getting to that point, and when we started playing “Guns + Ammunition,” it was just so obvious that that song was able to hit something that created this feud, this chaos, this manic-ness on stage that hasn’t disappeared, and it changes every single night.

MR: So your live act contains a performance art approach. How much of that would you say is in the mix on stage?

LF: Well, it’s not really a planned thing where we say, “Tonight’s going to be a night that we focus on performance art,” because that kind of goes against everything that I think live performance art is and stands for. Where it falls into a more conceptual-based is just because we’re trying to all acknowledge the fact that we’re human beings on stage and we’re in a room with a bunch of other human beings who can be affected by us. It’s all just feeling what the room needs and then giving whatever that is to them on a night-by-night basis. There’s a lot of pushing on boundaries and sometimes taking things back.

PD: I think that the real thing that I’ve learned from Leah, especially from her education with performance is just seeing vulnerability and the risk of failure as a good thing. Something that I think all five of us have realized is that it’s not interesting to watch a performer sit in a comfortable chair and play their song. If you’re going to get at that conflict that we’re talking about you need to see somebody at their absolute breaking point, the break where they think that everything’s going to fall apart and maybe it does for a few seconds, maybe mistakes are made, maybe guitars get unplugged and there’s things being thrown. That’s what we’re trying to get at, that point where the audience really isn’t sure if what’s happening is good or bad or intentional or how they should feel about it or react. Those are the moments in a July Talk show where everybody in the room is feeling so uncomfortable and so intimate at the same time. I think that’s kind of what we’re trying to go for, those moments.

LF: When you’re on stage, you can totally manipulate people. If Peter smashes his face and he’s bleeding but then I say, “Don’t worry, it’s fake blood,” seventy-five percent of the audience will believe me. You can really take them along for whatever sort of ride they’re willing to go on.

MR: July Talk was acknowledged as Best Alternative Group of the Year by Canadian Sirius/XM’s indie awards, and you’ve also been nominated Group of the Year at the Juno Awards. These are pretty big accomplishments considering this is technically your debut EP.

LF: We’re totally babies.

PD: [laughs] We actually joke about it all the time. It happened far more quickly than we expected. It’s kind of just one of those situations where the point that we thought this band was going to is so far past that we’re really just trying to get to the point where we can live as artists and have ideas and put them into action. That’s our dream now, so we all just work together and our lives have, basically, been turned upside down. But we like them much more than our old lives.

MR: Hey July Talk, what advice do you have for new artists?

LF: Do your thing. Don’t give a f**k about what anyone else thinks. You’ve got to hone in on what it is that makes you, and what it is that you want to say and try not to be affected by that human urge to compete and compare and talk down to and all those things. At the end of the day, you’ve got to be a good person. That’s the important thing. You can’t be a s**thead.

PD: I think the biggest thing is just staying on the idea that if you make a mistake make it again and capitalize on it. That’s what people are interested in seeing. They’re interested in seeing human beings, they don’t want to see this glossy thing that has nothing to do with real life. That’s what we’re into. I don’t know if it will work for them.

Ian Docherty: Play a lot and tour.

Josh Warburton: I’m kind of reiterating, but I think being sincere in what you’re doing is important. It’s really easy when you’re a musician, and especially in this industry, to start to model certain elements of your act around what’s working around you. I think when that stuff happens, you get a lot Frankenstein bands, both visually and sonically. If you can stay the course and find what it is that influences you and then if your songs can translate and play well just on the acoustic guitar, then you’re golden.

Danny Miles: I full agree with Josh, being true to yourself, and Ian as well, working hard. It doesn’t come easy. We are a new band, but we’ve all been working hard for years before this.

LF: Try to be as smelly as possible and make all the people fall in love with your pheromones.

MR: [laughs] Where do you want July Talk’s future to go?

PD: I think we very early on decided that we needed to know what we were in it for. You obviously don’t become a musician to make money anymore, so it’s very important to know what you’re doing and why you’re doing it. Josh and I had that conversation when we first started the band. “What do we want?” I remember Josh’s answer was to make a great record, one of those records that people remember. My goal, if you want to call it that, was to have a show that people knew and could come and enjoy and see multiple shows in a tour and still feel like they wanted more. As soon as we started developing that, well, right now our live show is where we feel at home. We feel totally rewarded by it and we can’t get enough of that. The record is the next step, moving forward. You’re always trying to create that sound and capture that moment on record. I think that’s next for us. I hope with this release in the States we can continue exploring that.

LF: I think when you start a band, what you really want to do is take over the world but then the checkpoints of world domination keep getting farther and farther away and the world just keeps getting bigger and bigger. I think that’s kind of the motivating point to keep going, you just have to accept that you don’t know anything. For us, as long as this project keeps going and we’re constantly being pushed back onto our asses, it makes us want to stand up again and work harder and keep learning.

Transcribed by Galen Hawthorne

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A Conversation with Magic Man

Mike Ragogna: Here you are with your You Are Here EP, “Paris” being one of its featured tracks and premiered video. But enough of that. You’re a Boston act, a place from where many high-powered, iconic groups have emerged. So what is Magic Man’s superhero origin story?

Sam Lee: Well, we’re all from a mysterious alien planet where the lower gravity makes us musical geniuses.

MR: Hmm, there’s something familiar about this story. Watch it be the truth…

SL: No one would believe you even if it was! [laugh] In terms of the band, Alex and I actually grew up together, we’ve known each other since preschool, we grew up right down the street from each other. Then throughout middle school and high school we learned how to play music together. We played in a lot of bands together, a lot of different types of bands; some typical garage rock bands, some cover bands, played some instrumental, broody post-rock music. Magic Man, we started in the summer after our freshman year of college. It was the first thing we’d done together that really felt like something we could take pretty far. We self-produced and self-released our first album as Magic Man in winter of 2010, but that was when we were in college, so we weren’t really focusing on the music full time. We played a lot of basement shows, house parties, frat parties, did a little bit of touring, but really we were in school so that was taking up a lot of our time. But during that time, the band evolved from the two-piece of Alex and I to a five-piece band. We started focusing our sound more on a full rock band sound, still using a lot of the electronics and synths from when it was just the two of us and a laptop, but we tried to focus it on a more energetic, rock-oriented show. That’s kind of how the band developed the sound we have now, playing shows with the full band and writing with that sort of sweaty house party show in mind, trying to keep as much of that energy there in the music as we could.

MR: Is that how the creative process takes place? You and Alex create the core of the songs and then take it to the rest of the members?

SL: That’s exactly right. Alex and I usually come up with the songs. I’ll come to Alex with a chord progression or beat and he’ll come to me with a lyric or a melody or something like that and we’ll build the song up from there, get it to a demo state with just the two of us, and then bring it to the band to learn how to play live and to record.

MR: Do you guys come from Boston proper or one of the suburbs?

SL: We’re from a suburb called Newton.

MR: Do you think growing up in that part of the world had an influence on your creativity at all?

SL: I would say where we’re from definitely had an influence, particularly because Newton is obviously a relatively wealthy community and our parents were very supportive of our music. I don’t know how common it is everywhere, but starting in fourth grade we started playing the recorder. That was horrible. We were all really bad at it, but pretty soon after that, I took up an instrument in the school band. Newton South High School had a really good music scene. In Newton in general, there were a lot of kids playing music. Kids in bands playing in their parents’ garages or basements or wherever. I definitely feel like maybe not so much the geography of where we’re from, but the people influenced us definitely.

Alex Caplow: The mentality, yeah. The standard for what kind of music kids were playing in high school bands was far higher than just being in a jam band or playing covers. Everyone was sort of feeding off of each other’s creative energy. It wasn’t really enough to just jam out. People wanted to come see real bands with original music, so everyone was very, very passionate about their projects and about joining lots of different bands.

MR: So there was something in the dirty water.

AC: Yes.

SL: Yeah, yeah, there was definitely something in the dirty water!

MR: This is sort of an obvious question for someone as old as I am, but “Magic Man” to me references Heart’s song “Magic Man.” I’m imagining you’ve come across that a time or two.

SL: [laughs] Oh yeah.

AC: Yeah, we do come across it. It’s a great song but it’s also a coincidence. The story behind the band name is actually that when we were writing the first Magic Man songs we were in France, working on organic farms the summer after our freshman year of college. Sam was learning French. My mother is French, so I was happy to come join him. We met a lot of really interesting characters while we were there and writing music on his laptop during the day when it was too hot to work. One of the farms we were working at was hosting this circus festival by chance, so there were just hundreds of really crazy characters–jugglers, magicians–and we were doing more pitching circus tents than farming. The first person that we met was a young guy, around our age, who was an aspiring magician who called himself “The Magic Man.” He didn’t speak English very well, but he was this guy who showed us the ropes and was our first friend that we made and the first supporter of our music. He was the first to hear the songs we were working on at the time, so when we were thinking of what we should call this project, we decided we should name it after him.

MR: That’s a great story. Who influenced you guys?

SL: We listen to a ton of different music and try not to get bogged down or pigeonhole ourselves into one or two genres, especially when we’re working. We love listening to everything from Top Forty stuff to more obscure underground music. I feel like everything brings something to the table that gives you an interesting perspective. Then sometimes you hear something you like and you can steal it and use it in your own music.

AC: During the first songs that we wrote, we were listening to a lot of Arcade Fire and Postal Service and The Killers. I grew up listening to a lot of Coldplay, so we have a lot of that line between pop and alternative rock and electronic music, where all those circles intersect. That’s where we were trying to go with it, to take you to the best of all those worlds.

MR: And now comes the part of the story where the low-gravity alien gets signed to The Daily Planet…I mean Sony. How did that happen?

SL: Well, Derek [Davies] and Lizzy [Plapinger,] two good friends of ours who run the label Neon Gold had an imprint deal with Columbia. They signed our first album, Real Life Colors. We had put it up on BandCamp giving it away for free. We got some attention from blogs. It ended up on Pitchfork and a bunch of other blogs, which was great and we had some great feedback from fans. And at that point, we were kind of thinking, “We’re going to make a second album and we’re just going to do it the same way we recorded our first album. We’ll record it ourselves, produce it ourselves, friends will play on the record, and friends will help us make it.” All of a sudden, Neon Gold, our favorite label, one that’s released a ton of stuff we look up to, got in touch of us. It’s sort of like a dream come true, them wanting to work with us.

AC: It was hard to stay focused in school when that deal was presented to us. My future was no longer becoming a psychologist. I was dreading not knowing what I was going to do after school. I didn’t want to go to grad school. Then all of a sudden, we had this record deal and it was like, “You can be a musician as your occupation!” It was a great way to graduate.

MR: Congratulations! So the next step, obviously is a full album. Is this EP a sampling of what’s going to appear on that?

SL: Yeah, we recorded it in the same sessions. Once we graduated from school, we holed-up in a home studio in Providence, Rhode Island, where we moved after we graduated and really spent a year or more crafting these songs and taking ones we’d written in college and improving them. Last summer, we took those songs, we went to New York and worked with a producer there, a producer named Alex Aldi. We built the songs up from the demos and did some additional production and mixing and ended up with the songs that are now on You Are Here and Before The Waves, our album. It’s definitely a similar sonic palette, but hopefully on the album, there’s a little more variety, more room to tell a narrative and have the journey from the start of the album to the end.

MR: It’s interesting that your EP includes three songs with geographical shout outs…”Texas,” “Paris,” and “Nova Scotia.”

AC: Yeah, we actually have songs called “Chicagoland” and “South Dakota” on the album as well.

MR: Does this reveal a subconscious desire to travel the world as the band Magic Man?

SL: Alex is actually a South Dakota native from a past life; he’s been reincarnated and is inhabiting his alien body with the spirit of a South Dakotan. What do you call someone from South Dakota? Dakotan? Decoded?

AC: A South Coyote.

SL: It wasn’t something that we consciously set out to do, but we did name the EP You Are Here kind of thinking of those geographically-named songs. Once we were putting the songs together for the EP and album, we liked the connection. Writing about places is something that we’ve done for a long time. You can see a bunch that didn’t end up on the album that use the same tricks. It’s kind of a fun exercise, to write about how a place makes you feel or what it means to you, or to use it as a jumping off point for a song, especially being people who really like to travel and being a band that started when Alex and I were traveling. Thinking about how a place might inspire you is always a good place to start a song. You might end up with something that has nothing to do with the place by the time you’re finished, but that spark sometimes is sometimes a good way to come up with an idea.

AC: Yeah, one of our favorite songs was called “Tokyo.” Tokyo inspired the song, but it didn’t end up being about anything related to Tokyo so we thought that would be confusing. It was hard to change that name, but it was probably for the best.

MR: You could have an album filled with the names of places even though the songs have nothing to do with them.

SL: Yeah, Bon Iver’s second album has a bunch of songs named after places and I’m not sure what they have to do with the songs, but I’ve always liked them. It also gives a good image to the listener, I think. You think about the place in addition to what the lyrics are saying and how they relate.

MR: Who does most of what during the creative process?

AC: We both have different expertise. Sam is definitely more towards the production side and I lean more towards the melodic and lyrics side. It’s often that Sam has a beat or a chord progression and then I write a vocal melody over it and some gibberish lyrics and we pass it back and forth. There are other times when Sam totally changes the melodies or I start off with the initial groove. It’s really just a fully collaborative process.

MR: And the lyrics?

SL: We’re both definitely involved in the lyrics. On some songs, one person will write all of the lyrics and we’ll love it and only change a few things. Other times, we’ll sit down together and one of us will contribute a verse and the other will contribute a chorus. It ranges, totally. Some of the songs I can point to and say, “Alex wrote this,” and others I can say, “I wrote the majority of that,” but the majority of the songs are a collaboration. We start with something that someone came up with, but by the time we’re done it’s something we put equal amounts into.

AC: It is interesting to think about, because I’ve heard that for most singer-songwriters, the lyrics come first, that the core of the song is like the story they start telling. For us, we put a lot more energy into making sure the song works on its own without the lyrics. We focus on the feel and melodies and the sound that we want to go for, so I record gibberish lyrics for all the songs before we actually write the lyrics. I know I want it to go… [rhythmic verbiage], so I know exactly what sound I want to be there, and then we fit in the lyrics after to make sure it fits with the mood of the song. But first, we make sure that it stands on its own without lyrics at all.

MR: I’ve often wondered how bands stay together when the song concepts only come from the lead singer.

AC: It’s all the groupies.

SL: [laughs] The fact is we all do the same amount of work when we’re on tour. We all get the same benefits. It’s just a great lifestyle that we all enjoy. The other members of the band, while they don’t write the songs directly, they’re all songwriters themselves and they have the time to work on their own projects, so they definitely continue to fill creatively fulfilled even if it’s not through this particular project. And during practice, we all throw around tons of ideas and build the songs back up for the live show. It’s definitely a collaboration.

MR: What advice do you have for new artists?

AC: I would say that one of the things that helped us the most in reaching an audience was putting our first album out for free. Just focusing on sharing it with as many people as possible and not at all focusing on the money side of things. We knew that most importantly, we wanted people to hear the songs and if they liked them, they would share them with their friends. That’s how we built our fan base. The album was free and that blogs would post about it and say, “It’s free! Just click on this link to get the album, it’s actually pretty good!” So I would recommend that if you’re trying to get started, really send it around to as many people as possible.

SL: On that note, one thing that’s been pretty helpful for me on this journey so far is to remember that the reason you’re doing what you’re doing is because there are people out there who are supporting you, like the fans. They’re the reason you’re there. You wouldn’t be doing it if it weren’t for them. In the same vein, you try to give back or try to appreciate them. Sometimes there’s a show you don’t want to do because you’re tired and it’s been a long time and for you, it’s just another show. But for them? iI’s the show they’ve been really wanting to see or they’re just trying to have a good time that night. It’s important to remember that while you’re doing it for yourself because it’s your art, there are a lot of other people that are keeping you doing what you’re doing.

AC: Respond to their tweets, show them that you care and it will turn them into a life-long fan.

MR: What’s the goal down the road?

SL: Have you seen the show Pinky & The Brain?

MR: So this is about world domination.

SL: Yup. World domination. But in all seriousness, I think our goal is what I was just saying. We love playing music, we love writing music, we love touring and playing shows, so we want to be able to do that as long as we can. Now that our album is done, we’re focusing on the touring side of things, trying to play for as many different people as possible, travel to new cities and new countries even and play as many shows as possible. Once that touring cycle wraps up, I’m excited to get back in the studio and lather, rinse, repeat.

MR: And hope the magic happens again.

SL: Yes.

MR: Has this interrogation missed anything?

SL: In terms of important dates, our album’s coming out July 8th, you can preorder it now on iTunes.

AC: And you get stuff immediately for pre-ordering…

MR: Like a secret decoder ring?

SL: …and also on July 8th, we’re starting a west coast headline tour from San Diego to Vancouver and then after that we’re going to be on tour with Panic! At The Disco for pretty much the rest of the summer. We’ll be traveling over a lot of the US, so hopefully, we’ll be able to see as many people as we can and play a lot of shows.

Transcribed By Galen Hawthorne
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Heaven: Conversations with Robert Francis, Nazareth’s Dan McCafferty, The Mavericks’ Paul Deakin and NRBQ’s Terry Adams

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A Conversation with Robert Francis

Mike Ragogna: Hey Robert, here comes the corny joke: It looks like someone’s in Heaven with his new album. And this time out, you’re backed by the Night Tide. What’s the “Night Tide” a reference to?

Robert Francis: Well, I remember I was playing a show in Zurich, Switzerland, and at the time, I was playing with some of who I would consider the best musicians in LA. I got in with some really heavy musicians in the jazz field and I was looking around the stage and even though it it sounded great I didn’t feel like there was an energy there, it wasn’t palpable. Even though it osunded good I felt like the audience couldn’t feel it and one of those reasons was because perhaps when you’re hiring people and playing with session people they’re not necessarily as invested in the music as much as a band member would be. When coming back to do this new reocrd I wanted to try to do somethin different and have the camaraderie of a band and to pick musicians and assemble a band that would be totally different. So even though there were definitely some of the most raw moments on any record I’ve made where it’s just me and a guitar, the band itself I think, when they’re on the laubm it’s them and it’s very much a certain sound.

MR: Basically, it’s David Kitz and Ben Messelbeck with you, right?

RF: That’s right, and now we have Maxim Ludwig, who’s joined the band on the guitar. But he wasn’t on the album.

MR: Robert, I interviewed you for your last two albums and felt that Before Nightfall, at the time of its release, was a brilliant album. And I’m hearing a lot of similarities between that one and Heaven.

RF: Right. It’s similar to Before Nightfall because that was more like a band as well. Those guys are some of my best friends. After that album, when I moved into Strangers In The First Place, that’s when I started entering different territory and we had different people playing on the record. Even if it was someone as close to me as Joachim, the more people you start including, the less of a thread there is to tie everything together. I don’t know, it just feels so good on stage, to be a singer-songwriter or whatever you call it, what you have to carry on stage and deliver yourself is just so much, it’s nice to have people to fall back on. I know the Beatles said that’s what killed Elvis, that he was all alone whereas they had each other.

MR: The Night Tide is a visual that I think goes hand in hand with the music of the album. I think you knew that was the vibe of this project all along.

RF: I did! And because we’re all from the same place and we’ve all grown up basically in Santa Monica, that name just feels appropriate. It felt very natural to make this type of record with these guys.

MR: I think that’s part of the magic of what Ry Cooder was about.

RF: Yeah! For me, especially as someone who plays guitar all the live shows incorporate such strong moments with the guitar that I’ve never been able to appropriately capture on an album because so much of my guitar playing is a response to the place and the time and the feeling, it’s sort of like something that happens once. In a recording situation there’s too many possibilities to listen back and say, “Oh, I don’t really like the timing of that,” or, “I don’t like that part of the solo” and I know with Ry it’s the same thing. Compared to what he does live the albums are really shy I suppose, but he always incorporated these moods and these elements and these textures in the songs. It’s another way to express yourself on an album as opposed to just being like, “Guitar Guy.”

MR: You know, you sort of look like Bruce Springsteen.

RF: It’s very interesting. I think people are waiting for me to make the Springsteen record. [laughs]

MR:So “Love Is A Chemical” is your video of a song from the album. What was it like putting that together?

RF: Well in all honesty, someone made a video in Europe, they compiled it from some footage that I had that was supposed to be lyric video, and MTV really liked it in Europe. When I saw the video I was like, “Whoa, whoa, whoa, this is horrible. I hate this video.” so they were like, “Well MTV likes it and you’re going to lose a huge opportunity in Europe, it’s going to be airing on TV across multiple countries.” So I was like, “Well, shit, how can I turn around a video in one day?” The video that’s online now with me and Nastassja Kinski’s daughter Sonja, I was trying not to do the “car and girl” thing anymore but just naturally I was like, “I know I can do this,” so basically we just drove around and this really well-respected photographer Piper Ferguson shot it and me and my drummer edited the video, stayed up all night and turned it in just so we could make this deadline.

MR: “Love Is A Chemical” starts with your usual falsetto, that’s becoming a bit of a trademark for you. Perhaps that’s another reason you’re getting the Springsteen comparisons.

RF: He definitely does it.

MR: In the early days, anyway. But that reminds me a little bit of the vibe on “Junebug” from the Before Nightfall album.

RF: Yeah, yeah. These are things I’m aware of, they’re not accidents. I sort of realized the “Ooh” thing; “Keep On Running” also has “Oohs”; “I LIke The Air” has “Oohs” on Before Nightfall, a lot of songs have “Oohs” on them but on those songs they’re featured and mixed up front.

MR: Especially when you’re doing the falsetto and it’s not the group vocal, they’re really prominent. My favorite single of yours is “Wasted On You,” the lyrics on that are incredible. Do you have a couple of stories for these songs? I just want to sit back and listen.

RF: Yeah. So much of my life is spent with me trying to access the part of my brain that has been shut down. I remember when I was making One By One, my first reocrd, the purity and the naivete, everything that ecompasses that process, you’re making something that’s pure and just for yourself and nothing is attached to it, no expectations. For me, making records is trying to be honest with myself to try to access that mentality again the best I can. For “Wasted On You,” I wrote it in Ypsilanti when we were on tour, playing the college there. It’s just about the desperation and wanting to feel again, bleed for someone. Human beings naturally have to desensitize themselves so they’re not as vulnerable, they have to protect themselves, and I felt that to get over this relationship that consumed my entire life I had to get tough, and at one point I remember just sitting there alone in our hotel watching a train go by and thinking to myself, “Yeah, I don’t feel anymore.” It’s just about realizing that vulnerability as a songwriter is a must and it’s okay to be vulnerable and it’s okay to approach life this way and be an open wound, that it’s okay and I don’t have to be that tough guy. It’s about admitting myself that no matter what happens my mind is just drunk on this person.

MR: Are some of the other songs, including “I’ve Been Meaning To Call,” inspired by that?

RF: Yeah, and “I’ve Been Meaning To Call” is a similar notion. I met this girl on the road and when I cancelled it as I was going through what I guess I’d call a nervous breakdown I didn’t go home and I ran away with this girl that I met one time and went up to the upper penninsula of MIchigan and drove and drove and drove until we hit the top where Copper Harbor is. You turn on the radio and it’s Canadian radio because it’s so close to Canada, it’s just separated by Lake Superior. I basically just lost myself in this person and fantasized and created this world of being someone else and doing something else and the second I went back to LA, I realized that i was completely running away from everything. That’s the story behind that.

MR: The title track is another one, where “Heaven.” What inspired that one?

RF: When I was a kid my dream was to become a musician and tour and travel, pre even being that obsessed with music I remember watching Paris, Texas, because my sister thought it was cool. I couldn’t really understand the subject matter but seeing Harry Dean Stanton walk through miles and miles of desert, I became obsessed with that and I said, “What do I do? How can I become a musician?” or, “How can I travel like that?” I thought the only way to really do it was to be come a musician. So you spend your life thinking, “Oh, if I tour with this person or if I hang out with Neil Young or sign with this record label or put out this record or do this all these things are going to equal happiness,” that that’s my own personal fulfillment or my own personal heaven. Once you check off all these things and realize that you’ve accomplished them I was like, “Why do I want more? What is this? Who am I? What does this mean?” It’s sort of about that, it’s about that pursuit of what it means to be happy or the equilibrium that I’m searching for. I think everyone goes through that, every single person on this planet is in search of something and oftentimes when they get it, they still don’t understand why they’re not fulfilled.

MR: You’re happy, you’re content with this album and you’re going to be supporting it as a musician, but where do you go from here?

RF: Let’s see… I just got back from Europe, it was my first tour since 2012 and I really had a good time. I didn’t expect myself to enjoy touring again because of the way that it went last time, but I think this little break that I’ve taken in creating my own record at my own pace has allowed me to step back and fall in love with being a musician again. I used to have a bit of a chip on my shoulder in the sense that I felt like whatever I created was great and that I could sit on my hands and ride to the top. For the most part I watched myself self-sabotage a lot of situations because I think internally I knew that there’s so much for me to do, I had to step back and realize that before pursuing music seriously again. So now, I’ve returend to this state of mind where I’m really excited to perform. I feel like Heaven is a perfect bookend for these four albums, I’ve sort of said what I needed to say there and now I’m extremely excited to go into this new landscape of music that probably will be quite different from the records I previously made. I don’t know, I’m just excited to do it again. It’s pretty fun.

MR: Robert, what advice do you have for new artists?

RF: Coming back to one of the first things we talked about, it’s about being vulnerable, and to not be scared of that vulnerability.It’s really hrd to put yourself out on the line and share your deepest thoughts with the entire world. But I think as long as you’re true to yourself that right there should at least point you in the right direction. And don’t be discouraged by this strange new world we live in. I can’t even believe how much things have changed since we started. There was no Facebook, tehre was no Twitter, there was no Instagram, people really had time to listen. I think now I find a lot of songwriters are really confused, they’re like, “How do I get heard?” “How do I do this and how do I do that?” because people don’t have the time anymore to really listen like they used to, but you can’t let that derail your music. If it’s real and it’s good and you just tour and work hard and find someone close to you to help you, whoever that person may be, I think you’ll do just fine.

MR: Considering the family that you grew up in, you had a different angle coming into the music. You came in soul first.

RF: Yeah, I was lucky. Because of my “heritage,” I suppose, I never second-guessed myself once, that I would fail in this industry. I think that’s an important thing, you’ve got to be wide-eyed and go in and believe in who you are. Knock down every door.

MR: Which kind of brings me to “Hotter Than Our Souls.” “Hotter than our souls, I’ll be leaving here without you, if there’s a road you are forgiven, you are forgiven long as it goes, if there is a wind you are forgiven long as it blows, if there’s a story you are forgiven long as it’s told.” This is a song to yourself, isn’t it.

RF: It is. The song is like an ode to forgiveness, I suppose. I needed to forgive myself and forgive this person whom I was in a long relationship with. In order to let go you have to be able to forgive yourself and forgive the other person even though it’s the last thing you want to do. That’s how that song came about.

MR: Between you and Mary Chapin Carpenter, I don’t know who had the more traumatic relationship.

RF: [laughs] I think she probably did.

MR: I already kind of asked you where the future is heading, but are there any other creative avenues you’d like to explore? Novel writing? Visual arts?

RF: I’ve been compiling this book of poetry forever and I think it’s almost ready. I’ve almost written, also, a book, but that’s going to take a little longer until it’s released. I think if all goes well this book of poetry will be released before the end of the year, but most of the year it’s going to be touring. We’re doing a month and a half in the US, going back to Europe for another month and then coming back and doing another US run and then recording the next record at La Frette studios in France, it’s this old mansion that sits about thirty minutes outside of Paris, and then try to get far out.

MR: [laughs] Forgive me for asking this, but here goes. Do you think you’re ever going to get over the woman who’s been haunting you for all these years?

RF: You know, I don’t. I don’t think I’m ever going to get over it in the way I thought I could get over it, and I think in knowing that, finally after seven or eight years of this I think that’s going to give me the freedom to accept this for what it is and pursue something different. For so long you’re comparing everything to this one thing, “Why don’t I feel like this?” At some point, you realize everything is different. In that I’m learning to be excited. When something doesn’t work it just doesn’t work, you’ve got to realize that at some point.

MR: And just to be clear, what’s your favorite ice cream?

RF: Mint chocolate chip.

Transcribed by Galen Hawthorne

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A Conversation with Nazareth’s Dan McCafferty

Mike Ragogna: Dan, let’s talk about all things Nazareth and Rock ‘N’ Roll Telephone, your twenty-fourth album, right? That’s a great achievement. How did you get here?

Dan McCafferty: I think we’re just a band that grew up and started to write our own songs and stuff. Coming from Scotland at that time, there were really only four or five big gigs that people used to come and visit. It’s not like that now, of course. We started like any other band, doing Chuck Berry covers and Little Richard covers and on through the early eighties and then you start to write your own stuff. We played every place, eventually got signed and made records. It was a gradual buildup, but we always worked. Up until I got sick, we were doing two hundred, two sixty gigs a year. It was that work ethic thing, “It’s got to be a proper job.” Plus, you enjoy it so much! It just kind of flew by, Mike, I hope to tell you, but it was very interesting along the way.

MR: Dan, how did you guys develop your sound?

DM: I guess just paying attention to what was going on and what we really liked. I found out at a very early age that I preferred people like Little Richard to Cliff Richard, that kind of thing. Pop music was okay, it was better than listening to your dad’s music, but it didn’t have enough balls. As the years go on you develop, and when I discovered American music, Little Richard and Chuck Berry and then later in life people like Bob Seger and all the Detroit bands, it was just like, “Whoa, what’s going on here?” Because at home, we had The Shadows and people like Billy Fury who were all kind of pseudo-American imitations of Elvis and stuff, where you guys were producing stuff that was frightening to us at the time and we wanted to go there. It was like, “Whoa, this is very cool.” Except it was very “good” at that time, there wasn’t such a word as “cool.” “Oh, this is exciting.” It was just a fair bit of stuff coming out of there and we got involved. I guess you just get influenced all the way along. My father was a great jazz and blues fan, so once I heard stuff like Chuck Berry I thought, “Yeah, man, my dad’s got that stuff.” It wasn’t Chuck Berry, but the stuff before that had the same kind of vibe and I’m going, “Hold on a minute!” It was a very interesting journey to get to who you want to be. Eventually, we played all sorts of gigs as cover bands and we covered The Beatles and The Stones and everybody else that as running around at the time just to get some work and pay for the equipment, and then we started to write our own stuff, and people actually liked it! It wasn’t like a plan, it wasn’t like, “We’re going to be rock stars, we’re shooting for this.” I guess it was like going through school, you know?

MR: Dan, all the songs on this album are originals. How did you guys put this album together? Was it any different from the others?

DM: That was pretty much the same. The last three albums Pete and I have written some of the stuff but mainly it’s been Lee and Jimmy, and that’s been working for us, so if it’s not broke don’t fix it. There was just so much material for this album, and we ended up with thirteen tracks which we thought were the best tracks and again, it’s just a natural thing, “Do youse all like this?” “yes,” and if you don’t like something it’s just so much easier to get it together. That’s how this album went, we made it in six weeks. It was incredible.

MR: When you look back at your career, you’ve had international hits, but who would’ve guessed one of your biggest hits would be a cover of Joni Mitchell’s “This Flight Tonight”?

DM: Right! Back in the day, when we were touring everybody used to have cassette players and you’d play cassettes on the bus as opposed to CDs. You’d make up your favorite tracks at the time of other people’s music and we found out that Joni’s “This Flight Tonight” used to come on all the time on everybody’s tracks. We thought, “We all like this, why don’t we try and do something with it?” Obviously, Joni’s version is so personal for Joni, it’s such a love affair she was talking about, because she’s that kind of writer, but for us it was like travel music, “This flight tonight, again?” We wanted to make a rock song out of it. It had the same sentiment, you’re leaving people you love, maybe you’re making a mistake taking this flight, whatever, but you’re always gambling. It was a natural choice. The nice part of it was when the single was released in Britain we were actually in the States starting a tour and Joni was recording Court And Spark at A&M studios, so we went and said, “Hello, we’ve recorded one of your songs,” and she’s going, “A rock band?” But we played it and she loved it. It was great. About a year later I’d been all over the world except America, and she was playing in London and she said, “Now I’m going to do a big Nazareth song” and she played “This Flight Tonight” which we thought was rather nice of her.

MR: You also rocked up “Love Hurts.”

DM: Yeah, believe it or not I think officially it’s the first rock ballad. Somebody told me that, I don’t know. But yeah, it was just a song that we had done as kids playing in bars and stuff and we liked it because Pete and I could both sing it. We did a lot of Everly Brothers stuff because they were popular at the time, and always will be with me. When you were making albums in those days you had to record a few extra tracks of B-sides for vinyl and stuff, so we did “Love Hurts.” Jerry Moss came over to hear the record and he said, “No, no, no, I want that one on the album.” So thank god for Jerry Moss, because we put “Guilty” on the European one.

MR: It shows how awesome A&M was, Jerry Moss deciding to break that record.

DM: Yeah! When Jerry signed us, they only had one other rock band at the time because it was all The Captain & Tennille and Joan Armatrading and that kind of thing. I think they were trying to get into the rock business, so he decided to sign Nazareth. I could see Jerry’s thinking: “Well this will get on–” at the time–“AM radio.”

MR: You must have been ecstatic when Guns ‘N’ Roses covered your “Hair Of The Dog.”

DM: Oh yeah, sure! It was brilliant, it was great. We met the guys a hundred years ago, we played some shows in California and the boys were fans so they came along. They’re great lads, they’re really good boys. They’ve had a few problems but they’re great. I’m sorry they’ve split up actually. In fact we were recording Big Dogz and Axl was playing in Prague, so we went to see him. Kid’s great. He hasn’t got a watch and he doesn’t know what time it is, but he’s a real performer. “The show starts at eight, Axl. Eight. Not twelve.” [laughs] He’s a nice guy.

MR: Speaking of “Hair Of The Dog,” that became an American classic. I think it got renamed “Son Of A Bitch” over here.

DM: The thing is initially we wanted to call the album Son Of A Bitch and A&M said, “Oh, you can’t call it that,” and we said, “Why not?” and they said, “Well, Sears won’t sell it.” We said, “Who are Sears?” We’re from Scotland, we had no idea who Sears & Roebuck were. So we called it Hair Of The Dog which in a way is “ear of the dog,” which is “son of a bitch.” It was just twisted humor, I suppose. We couldn’t understand this false morality in America. “You can’t sing ‘Son of a bitch’ on the radio,” but John Wayne, who is the nearest thing to a pope America’s got, surely, says it on the movies.

MR: Selective censoring.

DM: [laughs] Whatever. It doesn’t matter because music will find a way to do it anyway I always feel. If it’s good and people like it they’ll play it anyway. They’ll play in the jukebox or they’ll go out and buy it.

MR: What are a couple of your favorite tracks on the album?

DM: I really like “Boom Bang Bang.” Actually, the opening track, because it’s kind of a rude and dusty old man, which I kind of like. I like “Rock ‘N’ Roll Telephone,” of course, and I love “Speakeasy.” I like this album, I really do, because it’ll possibly be my last album with Nazareth anyway, because I have COPD and I can’t tune anymore.

MR: I’m sorry, Dan.

DM: It’s a hellish thing, but hey, you’ve got to get something, I suppose. I’d love to complain and bitch and whine but who the hell is going to listen? But I’m really so proud of this album. I really am.

MR: Dan, what’s your advice for new artists?

DM: This is going to sound really old, but do what you like. If you don’t you’ll get talked into something by people telling you what you should do and you’ll end up not liking yourself very much and being pissed off by what you do. So enjoy what you do, and if it’s good and people like it, great. If it’s not good and people don’t like it, you’re enjoying it. It’s like saying to a painter or a guy that’s a good car mechanic; do something you like. Don’t be trendy, don’t really listen to establishment votes. And get a lawyer. Definitely get a lawyer. Definitely. And get a lawyer to watch the lawyer.

MR: Now that you’re going to be taking it easy from Nazareth, what are you going to be working on?

DM: Well I can sing two or three or four songs in a row without having to have a break, so I’m going to do a thing in January, “Rock Meets Classic” it’s called. I’ve done it before, it’s really good fun. And there’s a guy I know who’s writing an opera and he wants me to sing on a song in it. But I can record anything! I can record for anybody. I’m looking for a job here, if anybody needs a singer to make a record I’m your man. Apart from that I don’t even know, I’m just waiting to see if anything comes along.

MR: Can you believe you sold thirty million albums worldwide?

DM: No, I can’t. It’s like a telephone number to me. I’ve got two managers to should be in jail. It’s the rock ‘n’ roll story. If you’ve not been ripped off twice you’re not a proper rock ‘n’ roll band.

MR: I love that the name Nazareth was inspired by a song by The Band of all things.

DM: That’s true! That’s actually true. When The Band came out for us we were just getting our start, we were looking for a name and all that. Big Pink was such a good album. We’d heard Ronny Hawkins and the Hawks and all that, but this was a whole different side of the coin. And we heard them backing up Bob Dylan who’d went electric. We came to think we knew what the guys were about but we didn’t at all. It was just a stunning album.

MR: What a classic. “I pulled into Nazareth…”

DM: It works for me!

MR: Are you going to be on the road with the guys at all, supporting this album?

DM: No, I don’t think so. They have a new singer, a guy called Linton Osborne who’s very good. I’m really glad, because I would’ve felt kind of bad if the band stopped because I’d left. I’d feel bad, some kind of Catholic guilt or something.

MR: [laughs] Do you feel guilty that so many Doctor Who fans are going to be very upset with the cover photo of an exploding telephone booth?

DM: Well, you know, no. Not at all. You know The Doctor will come back as another person…

Transcribed by Galen Hawthorne

2014-06-17-MavericksTourNow.jpg

A Conversation with The Mavericks’ Paul Deakin

Mike Ragogna: You’re on the Twenty-Five Live Tour. What has that been like? Has it been any different from any of your non-anniversary tours?

Paul Deakin: I probably have to lump in since we’ve gotten back together, since the hiatus, and to be honest with you although we did look at a retrospective and the name of this tour this year and maybe next year, because that marks the twenty fifth anniversary which is a milestone, the difference is that we consciously went all the way back to the beginning and picked and chose some songs that were representative of the band over the years, including some covers that we did at the time that reminded us of that. But really, the main difference in the band dates back to the year before this when we got back together and just that it was a lot of fun again.

MR: What are some of those things that make it fun to still be with the band?

PD: Originally, the idea was just for the band to get together for a reunion tour, somebody offered us a ridiculous amount of money and we’d been gone for seven or eight years, but I said, “I’m going to have to talk to Raul and Robert and make sure everyone really wants to do this,” because they were talking about twenty shows or something like that. When we met for dinner I hadn’t seen him in many, many years, and he was like, “It’d be disingenuous to just go out and play the hits. I want to do a new record and Scott Borchetta will help us put it out on Big Machine.” I was like, “You’re kidding!” We went right into the studio. We hadn’t played a note live and he was producing the record and he said, “I don’t want to do give any work dates, I just want to work it out and let it happen organically. If we get two songs the first week or so that’s great, if we get five, even better.” We got nine songs in two days. It just fell right back in. Really Eddie Perez is the only one in our lineup who wasn’t with us from the very beginning, but he was on the last one and arguably he should’ve been in the band from the very beginning because he fits in so well. But Jerry Dale came out of his retirement from music, out of his art career to come and play. When the Mavericks were on hiatus I played with a lot of great artists, none in the country field really, but there’s something with this band that is unique. I know you asked to describe what’s fun about it, and it’s that for some reason chemistry happens. Sometimes it’s inexplicable, or it’s hard to explain why this band does what it does together. I can pinpoint that we’re all audiophiles and we all have a love of playing but there’s something hive mind like within this band in the studio and live that I’ve never experienced with any other band or artist.

MR: Over the years, you’ve been shoehorned into the country genre even though you incorporate rock, R&B, Americana… How would you describe The Mavericks these days?

PD: [laughs] If I were Raul right now I’d say, “You expect me to do your job for you?” Somebody’s called it genre-non-specific, someone called it joyful noise, I don’t know, we started out more in the country field but in a way we’re kind of a self-pleasing band. It’s been kind of our blueprint for success. Pleasing ourselves and having fun has always seemed to work, and that transfers into the audience. We weren’t really concerned with genre when we started out. We’ve got our awards and success in the country field up until Trampoline turned into a pop hit in the UK. When we got together Scott Borchetta was kind enough to say, “Make whatever record you want.” The label didn’t care what it was, they just said, “Whatever you do, make a Mavericks record,” so that’s what we did. I think it stretches even further on the record we just recorded into other areas that maybe we haven’t touched on. There’s definitely still a country element in there because we love classic country music, so it’s really whatever we’re listening to and whatever makes it into the song that Raul wants to sing and record.

MR: After all these years, does it still feel like The Mavericks is a solid creative outlet and foundation regardless of what else you’ve all worked on, like solo careers, etc.?

PD: Yes, very much so. Obviously Raul had a very successful solo career, I think he said that he found himself missing finding some songs that he thought would be good for The Mavericks and wanting to do that. As I said, when we got back together that’s what I felt, after seven years off you don’t necessarily forget, but you don’t really feel how special this is until you’re sitting behind the drums playing with this band. One of the compliments I got was, “You drive this band, you’re so good,” and I’m like, “Thank you, I do play with passion, but I couldn’t move this band if I wanted to.” Like I said, it’s a hive mind, it chugs along and does what it does. That chemistry that’s inexplicable, not to compare ourselves to the Stones, but the Stones seperately don’t sound like The Stones. There are bands like that for reason that click together, the sum is greater than its parts.

MR: What do you think is the future for The Mavericks? Any plans?

PD: We just recorded a new record, so we’re going to be going at least another couple of years. Raul said what started out as twenty dates for the reunion tour might end up being another twenty years. There’s a plan to keep it going, so we’re really, really enjoying ourselves and having a lot of fun out there. Again, going back in the studio and realizing, “Holy shit, we did it again,” it feels really good. I haven’t heard the record yet even though I played on it. I was talking to someone else and they said, “How’s the record?” and I said, “I can’t tell you” because when you go in The Great Raul produces and he doesn’t let you hear the songs, we don’t do any preproduction, he barely even plays it for you before we actually record it because he wants that organic impression. He says, “I don’t want you to listen to the demo tapes and be married to that, it’s just template, let’s see what we come up with.” We go through a couple of different versions of things and record by the end of the week and it’s all first takes. “What did we do Monday?” I couldn’t tell you, I played that song once. Once he gets done with Niko Bolas, who’s coproducing it with him again he’ll let me hear it.

MR: What advice do you have for new artists?

PD: Get a day job. No. Honestly, I taught for ten years, and I was always very honest, I said, “Look, the chance of you making a living at this isn’t very good, but I really believe your best shot at doing this is to find your voice and stay true to that, whatever it is as a band or an artist.” Definitely please yourself first, don’t follow a trend, do what you want. Obviously we all are inspired by different kinds of music, follow your passion. Then, if it doesn’t end in the success that you wanted it to, you’re still ahead of the game because that’s your gift right there, being able to play what you love. Strangely enough, that’s your best shot at success in life.

MR: If you had any advice to give to yourself when you started out, what would that have been?

PD: Oh, good Lord… I don’t know if I want that printed! [laughs] Uh, floss? I don’t know. I look back on those early days and they were insane. I’m glad we survived it. The first time that happens to you and fame and success happens–I never really believed in the whole fame thing anyway, I was old enough not to really believe in that–we didn’t think it was going to end. When you’re in that moment and you’re on your up ride you always think, “Oh, it’s going to keep going” and nothing bad can ever happen, so you’re a little crazy and reckless, and we were. I probably wouldn’t have eaten so much room service, I probably could pay my mortgage with my room service bills. I probably wouldn’t change that much honestly because it was the experience of a lifetime, and to be able to experience it again with a different take on it, obviously we’ve grown somewhat more mature and it’s more about the music than it is about the partying. We probably partied a little too hard in our early days. That was one of the reasons we had to take a break.

Transcribed by Galen Hawthorne

2014-06-17-NRBQJune17.jpg

A Conversation with NRBQ’s Terry Adams

Mike Ragogna: Let’s get down to Brass Tacks, Terry.

Terry Adams: What was that fifteen seconds of silence about?

MR: That’s just to get my recording software synched-up.

TA: We used to say, “We’d like to have two minutes of silence before this performance, please,” and everybody would just go wild. [laughs] It never worked for our audience, they were screaming and throwing stuff, “Come on!”

MR: Okay, let’s get down to… oh, right, did that lame joke. Sooo, tell us everything there is to know about Brass Tacks. What went into this album? You’re on keyboards and vocals again and you’ve got Scott Ligon and Conrad Choucroun and Casey McDonough, how did you approach this differently from the other albums?

TA: Well every time we get together we record a couple of tunes, so there wasn’t time to stop and make an album, but the last few times were together we did a few songs and then we said, “Hey, we’ve done enough, let’s see what we got.”

MR: That’s a comfortable arrangement, huh?

TA: Yeah. It’s no rush, we took our time and did it when we were together. We don’t play all the time, we’re not always on the road. There’s some breaks between tracks. So what do you think of it?

MR: I think it’s cool! I think it’s your usual nutty, collective genius. Do you mind if I use the word “nutty”?

TA: [laughs] Okay. [laughs]

MR: Your arrangements are as sophisticated as they are fun to listen to. What’s the creative, nutty genius process like these days?

TA: It’s getting the right sound and the right tempo and the right feel for the songs we write. It’s rpetty simple, pretty basic.

MR: What about as far as the songwriting and all that? What goes into that these days, and maybe versus how you did it in the past?

TA: Well, there was an instant song on this album called “Love This Love We Got.” It was probably the only time I’ve written with someone else, Scott and Casey, where I got this idea and within fifteen minutes we all three wrote a song and recorded it right then. Every other time I co-wrote it was really me finishing a song up to one certain point and then just saying, “Hey, I need a line here” or a bridge or something like that, but this was all at once. I like that one.

MR: Over the years, what has the brotherhood of NRBQ been like? What has it evolved into at this point?

TA: [laughs] I’m always the guy when we’re in hotels it used to be dial nine and then the room number or something and we’d call each other, “What’s on TV?” When we’re not on the road I’m still that way. Even if we had a week off I’d be bugging guys at home, “Hey, you watching channel five?” It’s recognizing the same things. Loving the same commercials, whatever it is that happens to stick out in the current times. Did that answer anything? [laughs]

MR: [laughs] Yes, that proves that you guys are after all these years.

TA: With Casey and I, we’re alway sending each other pictures of Julie Newmar. Still hung up on Julie Newmar! I haven’t gotten past that yet. But you know what we also found out? One of my biggest pet peeves is gas-powered leafblowers, I can’t stand it that people would rather do that–they wear ear protection but anybody walking by doesn’t, and they burn gas instead of using a broom–it’s a pain to me. I found out that Julie Newmar has maybe an even bigger hatred for gas-powered leafblowers than I do! So now I really want to meet her. Not only do I have a crush on her but I also want to talk about this.

MR: Now how in the world did you find something like that out?

TA: Well, you know, people just tell me. I guess all information’s available today. Maybe she had a court case suing somebody because they were using this thing next door and she couldn’t stand it anymore. The pitch that they make is more detrimental than a gas-powered lawnmower, it’s a higher pitch that gets under your brain.

MR: That brings us to “Get That Gasoline.” You might express it in a humorous way, but you do feel strongly about conservation, don’t you?

TA: Oh yeah. I was always the guy in the band who, going back to motel rooms, “Okay, we’re going to go play now, make sure you turn your lights off in your room.” I couldn’t stand it when a member of the band would leave all their lights on in the room and the TV set. I’d say, “What are you doing?” “Uh, so anybody walking by will think somebody’s in here and they won’t come in here and rob my pajamas.” It’s a big trade-off. You’ve got your pajamas, but pretty soon you won’t need any pajamas because the Earth will be dead!

MR: Gotta love when Congresspersons and Senators doubt climate change exists and if it did, nothing can be done about it.

TA: Yeah. Everybody knows the old thing where people say something but they’re really saying something else. It’s really not about whether or not you believe it, it’s whether or not you want to keep making money that way. People do that all the time. They say one thing and there’s a hidden, self-serving message.

MR: Ignorance is a really big cash cow.

TA: Yeah.

MR: Speaking of social issues, there’s “Greetings From Delaware” on the new album, and it’s all about credit cards. What’s the story on that one?

TA: Well, living on the road, you have to have credit cards, but it’s just… [sighs] There’s a line in there about, “I’ll show you how you can live it now.” It’s wild how can keep going, you fill up one, you fill up another one. You’ve got to be spontaneous on the road, “We’re changing hotel rooms, we’ve got to book this flight” and so on. Even though I’d written the song a little while back I know how it feels now. I don’t know about your side of the country, but we get the bills from Delware. I think all the banks hide–er, live there. They have a tax shelter or something over there, so whenever I see mail from Delaware it’s always, “Hey, how are you doing?”

MR: Especially Wilmington.

TA: That’s right! You know about that.

MR: I have my fair share of mail from there myself, thank you.

TA: [laughs] That’s a fun song, though, isn’t it?

MR: Yeah, but I wouldn’t expect anything less from NRBQ, sir. So…do you guys even know how to define yourselves?

TA: No, we never have! I’ve never had an answer for that. The reverse is the crazy one, to say, “What kind of band are you?” and then come up with some narrow thing, “We’re a this band.” What are you doing to yourself? “Oh, you’re one of fifteen hundred thousand of this kind of band.” Why be one of something? Why be a part of it? In the fifties or before that things were more localized, DJs could play songs in the south that they didn’t play in the north and there really was something to that, growing up in that area, but we’re living on the planet now. It’s honest language to use sounds to express yourself.

MR: Wow.

TA: If it’s time for this, it’s time for that. It’s not ever a display of different stuff, it’s just speaking. This is the way we are now, this is the way the world is.

MR: Well when you look at NRBQ, I’ve heard people describe you as being anywhere between Tower Of Power and Frank Zappa. And you’ve had songs covered like “Get Rhythm” and “Me And The Boys.” You know song structure, yet NRBQ is almost like structured madness.

TA: [laughs] And I feel as strongly about bringing in songs that I didn’t write as I did about the ones I did, although there’s no thanks for it, I don’t get any money for it, I never took credit for it. Now I wish I had. I have a gift that I can hear music and know something that no one else is thinking of and figure out how it should be, how it could be applied ot the modern world as NRBQ. Somebody will say they’re doing the cover of Johnny Cash, there’s no “cover” there, this is new music, as I see it.

MR: Exactly, you’re using the bare bones of the piece but you’re making it NRBQ. The band has perservered over the years, you’ve had your fair share of stuff happen. Recently, you lost Tom Ardolino, how did that loss hit you and the group?

TA: Tom stayed with me and played up until maybe two years ago. He could read my mind, he understood my approach to music and culture. I just found a box full of letters from him dating back to 1970 before he was in the band. They’re all just enthusiasm for records that he found or things that I played for him or sent to him and he’d find something else. He just had a great, broad scope of appreciating culture, especially from entertainment television and music, and a good attitude about it. He never did really have to deal with a real world, as some people would call it. He didn’t have to grow up. Every day not just me but I’m sure some of his other close friends, too, want to reach out and pick up the phone and call him. Especially, as I was saying earlier, “Hey, check out Channel Five right now! Look who’s on the news.” He’s the guy that you want to turn to. I miss him a lot, but now if I want to say something to him instead of just keeping it to myself I just say it out loud to whoever’s with me, I say, “This is what Tom would’ve said.” [laughs]

MR: This has been a particularly challenging period, huh.

TA: Well, yeah. It is, but it’s something that I knew I was going to do to keep the band going. My resume is only “Leader of NRBQ.” I’m looking for a job. “You got a band called NRBQ I could be the leader of? I’m the perfect guy!”

MR: I really am surprised that you haven’t been tapped to host a late night show.

TA: I wouldn’t mind hosting an old movies show or something like that.

MR: What advice do you have for new artists?

TA: Well a musician has to figure that in the world today people are bombarded with music all the time. Listening to music is sort of a lost art. A lot of people can’t sit down, take the time out of the evening and actually listen to music without the visual stimulation and all kinds of stuff that has nothing to do with it. My advice to an artist today is to make music that will stop people and make them listen to it. You can’t just throw it in there and expect it to make a difference today. There’s just too much going on. That’s my opinion.

MR: So where is NRBQ going from here? What is the big plan?

TA: Well it’s an ongoing project, the band gets more popular every year. It’s something I’m seeing through.

MR: But you hate it, right? You’re just doing it out of obligation?

TA: [laughs] No, no. We have a lot of dedicated fans who have been with us for years, that’s the good thing. The bad thing is that we’ve had fans that have been with us for years, too. Some people want to wrap things up and put them on a shelf or in a jar and say, “This is how it is.” That’s the last thing that NRBQ could ever do. We don’t know yet what this band’s going to do. I’m determined to make this band the biggest band on the planet.

MR: That’s part of the plan?

TA: [laughs] We’re going to be tremendously successful as the years go by. Every time we put out a record it’s the one that people will start to hear. Same with every performance. It all really matters. It’s not about moe or the band, it’s about bringing the gift to the people.

MR: NRBQ hasn’t even peaked yet, has it.

TA: No, no way. Not even close. That’s not to take away from anything that’s ever happened, because all that’s been incredible. I love everybody that’s ever been in the band. I wish I could see them now, I’d give them a big kiss! I think that’s all great, but I’m not ready to sit back and bring out the photo album. That’s the last thing I want to do, turn into a reunion band bringing out the photo album. That’s so not NRBQ or anything that I believe in.

MR: So the number one record might have done more harm than good for NRBQ?

TA: [laughs] Well, I don’t know abou that, but I see what you mean.

MR: Maybe with a different career trajectory, NRBQ wouldn’t have kept the spirit and the feistiness. You’ve quoted Duke Ellington who said, “Jazz is the music of personality.” Is this personality becoming even bigger?

TA: What I meant by that was that the players react to each other, it’s not a plug-in, rehearsed–a lot of records today it doesn’t matter who’s on bass or who’s on drums because it’s really about the girl with the nice ass up front. This is really about how musicians play together, and the personalities play a big part of it. “Do these guys really like each other?” for one thing. “Are they listening to each other?” Yes, that’s the answer, yes.

MR: Your music is so subtly sophisticated, I really appreciate that about you. Do you see the recipe for NRBQ changing or evolving?

TA: Well it’s about getting better. The music is maybe complicated, but it’s the simple music that’s hardest to make.

Transcribed by Galen Hawthorne
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Why 'America's Got Talent' Winner Terry Fator Finally Stopped His 'Out-Of-Control' Spending (VIDEO)

When ventriloquist Terry Fator won “America’s Got Talent” in 2007, he signed a $ 100 million contract with The Mirage in Las Vegas and started living large. New cars, a lavish home, expensive possessions — Fator wanted it all, as he explains in an interview for “Oprah: Where Are They Now?”

“When I first started making money, man, I was out of control,” he says in the above video. “Two times a year, I would trade my car in and get a new one. I just couldn’t get enough of it. I just wanted to spend, spend, spend.”

But everything changed when the entertainer married his wife, Taylor Makakoa.

“My wife is very frugal,” Fator says. “I have to explain to her that I like the name-brand ketchup. Don’t get me the store-brand ketchup, because I don’t like the store brand. She wants to save money, but it’s a nickel less, you know?”

One of Fator’s more expensive marriage lessons came when Makakoa celebrated a birthday. “I bought her $ 40,000 worth of Tiffany jewelry. I mean, it was gorgeous… I was so excited,” he says. “I gave it to her for her birthday and the look on her face — I knew she didn’t like it.”

When Fator asked his wife what was wrong, she told him she simply couldn’t wear $ 40,000 worth of jewelry, as beautiful as it was.

“She took it back,” Fator says. “Got the money back and bought a $ 1,500 nice necklace. She gave the rest to her favorite animal charity.”

Makakoa’s frugality has since rubbed off on Fator. “She’s really helped rein me in,” he says.

New episodes of “Oprah: Where Are They Now?” begin airing on Sunday, June 1, at 9 p.m. ET on OWN.

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Monty Python's Terry Gilliam Calls Reunion 'Depressing'

Terry Gilliam is reportedly having a hard time getting excited about reuniting with the other members of the pioneering comedy troupe Monty Python “I find it depressing that we’re getting back together again” he said in a recent interview with the London Evening Standard “We worked so hard to get…

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